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Encyclopedia > North Slavic languages

The term North Slavic languages (or, North Slavonic languages) is sometimes used to combine the West Slavic and the East Slavic languages into one group, as opposed to the South Slavic languages. This North-South distinction of the Slavic dialect continuum along cultural, linguistic and geographical lines is not a commonly accepted view, but many prominent Slavists use it, albeit often for reasons of convenience only. This article or section should be merged with List of West Slavic languages The West Slavic languages is a subdivision of the Slavic language group (q. ... This article or section should be merged with List of East Slavic languages The East Slavic languages constitute one of three regional subgroups of Slavic languages, currently spoken in Eastern Europe. ... South Slavic languages is one of the three groups of Slavic languages (besides West and East Slavic). ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... Slavistics is the study of Slavic languages, Slavic literature and Slavic culture. ...


Some Slavists believe that a separate group of North Slavic languages once existed. The dialect formerly spoken in the vicinity of Novgorod (the so-called Old Novgorod dialect) contains several Proto-Slavic archaisms that did not survive in any other Slavic language, and can in their opinion be considered a remnant of an ancient North Slavic branch. Velikiy Novgorod (Но́вгород) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the highway (and railway) connecting Moscow and St Petersburg. ... Old Novgorod dialect (Russian древненовгородский диалект, also translated as Old Novgorodian or Ancient Novgorod dialect) is a term introduced by Andrey Zaliznyak (Андрей Анатольевич Зализняк) to account for the astonishingly distinct linguistic features of the East Slavic birch-bark writings from the 11th to 15th centuries excavated in Novgorod and... Proto-Slavic is the proto-language from which Old Church Slavonic and other Slavic languages later emerged. ...


There is also a group of circa ten artificial languages that belong to a (fictional) North Slavic branch of the Slavic languages. The authors of these languages were inspired by the existence of West, East and South Slavic languages and the absence of a (known) North Slavic group. Most of these languages therefore have an experimental character; they suppose a certain influence of the Germanic, the Finno-Ugric and/or the Baltic languages. Despite the fact that the creators of these languages have worked independently from each other and in different time frames, these languages have several elements in common. An artificial or constructed language (known colloquially as a conlang among aficionados), is a language whose phonology, grammar and vocabulary are specifically devised by an individual or small group, rather than having naturally evolved as part of a culture as with natural languages. ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... Approximate geographical distribution of areas where indigenous Finno-Ugric languages are spoken. ... The Baltic languages are a group of related languages belonging to the Indo-European language family and spoken mainly in areas extending east and southeast of the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe. ...


The best-known examples of constructed North Slavic languages are: Sevorian (Sievrøsku), Nassian (Nassika), Seversk, Slavëni, and Vozgian.


References

  • Bernard Comrie & Greville G. Corbett, The Slavonic languages (London, 1993), pp. 75 & 115-119.
  • Andrii Danylenko, "The 'Greek Accusative' vs. the 'New Slavic Accusative' in the Impersonal Environment: an Areal or Structural Discrepancy?", from the ICHL Indo-European Workshop, August 2005.
  • Marc L. Greenberg, Uralic Influences in South Slavic
  • Arne Hult, "On the verbal morphology of the South Slavic languages (in comparison with the North Slavic languages, especially Russian", Papers from First Conference on Formal Approaches to South Slavic Languages. Plovdiv October 1995. Dragvoll, University of Trondheim, Linguistics Department (= University of Trondheim. Working Papers in Linguistics 28), ss. 105-35. (23)
  • Frederik Kortlandt, "Early dialectal diversity in South Slavic II", in: Dutch Contributions to the Thirteenth International Congress of Slavists, Ljubljana: Linguistics (SSGL 30). Amsterdam – New York: Rodopi, 2003, 215-235. [1]
  • Frederik Kortlandt, From Proto-Indo-European to Slavic
  • Gilbert C. Rappaport, "A Minimalist Approach to Case Marking in Slavic"
  • Alan Timberlake, 1978, "On the History of the Velar Phonemes in North Slavic" [in Russian with English synopsis]. In Henrik Birnbaum, ed., American Contributions to the Eighth International Congress of Slavists, vol. 1, Linguistics and Poetics. Columbus, OH: Slavica Publishers.
  • Hannu Tommola, 2000, "On the Perfect in North Slavic." Östen Dahl (ed.), Tense and Aspect in the Languages of Europe. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 441-478.

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