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Encyclopedia > North Korea and weapons of mass destruction
This article documents a current event.
Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.
North Korea and weapons
of mass destruction

Events Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Weapons There have been a number of North Korean missile tests. ... A North Korean missile test occurred on May 29 and 30 of 1993. ... A Taepodong-1 missile fired in 1998. ... Picture of Taepodong-1 missile test from 1998 Two rounds of North Korean missile tests were conducted on July 5, 2006. ... The 2006 North Korean nuclear test was the detonation of a nuclear device conducted on October 9, 2006 by the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea. ...

  • Taepodong-1
  • Taepodong-2

See also Taepodong-1 is a three-stage intermediate-range ballistic missile developed in North Korea and currently in service there. ... The Taepodong-2 (TD-2, also spelled as Taepo-dong 2[1]), (Korean: 대포동 2호) is a designation used to indicate a North Korean three-stage ballistic missile design that is the successor to the Taepodong-1. ...

v  d  e

North Korea claims to possess nuclear weapons, and the CIA asserts that it has a substantial arsenal of chemical weapons. North Korea was a member of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty but withdrew in 2003, citing the failure of the United States to fulfill its end of the Agreed Framework, a 1994 agreement between the states to limit North Korea's nuclear ambitions, begin normalization of relations, and help North Korea supply some energy needs through nuclear reactors. Musudan-ri is a rocket launching site in North Korea at 40°51′N 129°40′E. It lies in southern North Hamgyong province, near the northern tip of the East Korea Bay. ... On September 9, 2004, there was an event suspected to be a large explosion in North Koreas second northernmost province of Ryanggang. ... The Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center[1] is North Koreas major nuclear facility, operating its first nuclear reactors. ... Korean Peoples Army refers to the armed personnel of the military of North Korea. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 in New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Agreed Framework was signed on October 21, 1994 between North Korea and the United States. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ...


On October 9, 2006, the North Korean government issued an announcement that it had successfully conducted a nuclear test for the first time. Both the United States Geological Survey and Japanese seismological authorities detected an earthquake with a preliminary estimated magnitude of 4.2 on the Richter scale in North Korea, corroborating some aspects of the North Korean claims.[1] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The 2006 North Korean nuclear test was the detonation of a nuclear device conducted on October 9, 2006 by the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...

Contents

Nuclear weapons

Nuclear weapons
One of the first nuclear bombs.

History of nuclear weapons
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear arms race
Weapon design / testing
Effects of nuclear explosions
Delivery systems
Nuclear espionage
Proliferation / Arsenals The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... Image File history File links A picture of a mockup of the Fat Man nuclear device, from http://www. ... A nuclear fireball lights up the night in a United States nuclear test. ... For the 1989 computer game, see Nuclear War (computer game). ... U.S. and USSR/Russian nuclear weapons stockpiles, 1945-2006. ... The first nuclear weapons, though large, cumbersome and inefficient, provided the basic design building blocks of all future weapons. ... Preparation for an underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site in the 1980s. ... A 23 kiloton tower shot called BADGER, fired on April 18, 1953 at the Nevada Test Site, as part of the Operation Upshot-Knothole nuclear test series. ... // Nuclear weapons delivery is the technology and systems used to place a nuclear weapon at the position of detonation, on or near its intended target. ... Nuclear espionage is the purposeful giving of state secrets regarding nuclear weapons to other states without authorization (espionage). ... World map with nuclear weapons development status represented by color. ... This is a list of nuclear weapons ordered by state and then type within the states. ...

Nuclear-armed states

US · Russia · UK · France
China · India · Pakistan
Israel · North Korea
South Africa This is a list of states with nuclear weapons, sometimes called the nuclear club. ... The United States was the first country in the world to successfully develop nuclear weapons, and is the only country to have used them in war against another nation. ...

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Background

Korea has been a divided country since 1949, when it was liberated from the defeated Japan after World War II. The Korean War was fought from June 25, 1950 until a ceasefire. However, since North Korea and South Korea have still not officially made peace, strictly speaking, the war has yet to officially end. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tensions between North and South have run high on numerous occasions since 1953. The deployment of the U.S. Army's Second Infantry Division on the Korean peninsula and the American military presence at the Korean Demilitarized Zone are publicly regarded by North Korea as an occupying army. In several areas, North Korean and American/South Korean forces operate in extreme proximity to the border, adding to tension. This tension led to the border clash in 1976, which has become known as the Axe Murder Incident. The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The 2nd Infantry Division (Heavy) is a formation of the United States Army. ... Map of the Korean DMZ. The DMZ is given in red. ... Belligerent military occupation, occurs when one nations military garrisons occupy all or part of a foreign nation during an invasion (during or after a war). ... The tree that was the object of the 1976 Axe Murder Incident (Photo 1984). ...


The U.S. rejected North Korean calls for bilateral talks concerning a non-aggression pact, and stated that only six-party talks that also include the People's Republic of China, Russia, Japan, and South Korea are acceptable. The American stance was that North Korea has violated prior bilateral agreements, thus such forums lacked accountability. Conversely, North Korea refused to speak in the context of six-party talks, stating that it would only accept bilateral talks with the United States. This led to a diplomatic stalemate. A non-aggression pact is an international treaty between two or more states, agreeing to avoid war or armed conflict between them even if they find themselves fighting third countries, or even if one is fighting allies of the other. ... The six-party talks aim to find a peaceful resolution to the security concerns raised by the North Korean nuclear weapons program. ... Diplomat redirects here. ...


On November 19, 2006 North Korea’s Minju Joson newspaper accused South Korea of building up arms in order to attack the country, claiming that "the South Korean military is openly clamoring that the development and introduction of new weapons are to target the North." Pyongyang accused South Korea of conspiring with the United States to attack the isolated and impoverished state, an accusation made frequently by the North and routinely denied by the U.S.[2] is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Chronology of events

This Chronology of the North Korean Nuclear Program begins in 1989 with the end of the Cold War and the decline of the USSR as the main economic ally of North Korea. ...

Plutonium

Concern focuses around two reactors at the Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center, both of them small power stations using Magnox techniques. The smaller (5MWe) was completed in 1986 and has since produced possibly 8,000 spent fuel elements. Construction of the larger plant (50MWe) commenced in 1984 but in 2003 was still incomplete. This larger plant is based on the declassified blueprints of the Calder Hall power reactors used to produce plutonium for the UK nuclear weapons program. The smaller plant produces enough material to build one new bomb per year; if completed, the larger plant could produce enough for 10 each year.[3] It has also been suggested that small amounts of plutonium could have been produced in a Russian-supplied IRT-2000 heavy water–moderated research reactor completed in 1967, but there are no recorded safeguards violations with respect to this plant. Image File history File links Top of the core of the 5 MWe Yongbyon Magnox nuclear reactor, showing the fuel channels. ... Image File history File links Top of the core of the 5 MWe Yongbyon Magnox nuclear reactor, showing the fuel channels. ... The Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center[1] is North Koreas major nuclear facility, operating its first nuclear reactors. ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... The Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center[1] is North Koreas major nuclear facility, operating its first nuclear reactors. ... Schematic diagram of a Magnox nuclear reactor showing gas flow. ... MWe and MWt are units for measuring the output of a power plant. ... The Sellafield facility on the Cumbrian coast, United Kingdom Sellafield is the name of a nuclear site, close to the village and railway station of Seascale, operated by the British Nuclear Group, but owned since 1 April 2005 by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. ... General Name, Symbol, Number plutonium, Pu, 94 Chemical series actinides Group, Period, Block n/a, 7, f Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight (244) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 5f6 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 24, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... The United Kingdom is one of the five official nuclear weapon states under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and has an independent nuclear deterrent. ... Heavy water is dideuterium oxide, or D2O or 2H2O. It is chemically the same as normal water, H2O, but the hydrogen atoms are of the heavy isotope deuterium, in which the nucleus contains a neutron in addition to the proton found in the nucleus of any hydrogen atom. ... Heavy water reactors use heavy water as a neutron moderator. ...


On March 12, 1993, North Korea said that it planned to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and refused to allow inspectors access to its nuclear sites. By 1994, the United States believed that North Korea had enough reprocessed plutonium to produce about 10 bombs with the amount of plutonium increasing. Faced with diplomatic pressure and the threat of American military air strikes against the reactor, North Korea agreed to dismantle its plutonium program as part of the Agreed Framework in which South Korea and the United States would provide North Korea with light water reactors and fuel oil until those reactors could be completed. Because the light water reactors would require enriched uranium to be imported from outside North Korea, the amount of reactor fuel and waste could be more easily tracked, making it more difficult to divert nuclear waste to be reprocessed into plutonium. However, with bureaucratic red tape and political obstacles from the North Korea, the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO), established to advance the implementation of the Agreed Framework, had failed to build the promised light water reactors because the United States failed to uphold their end of the agreement by providing energy aid, and in late 2002, North Korea returned to using its old reactors. March 12 is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 in New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... A military strike is a limited attack on a specified target. ... The Agreed Framework between the United States of America and the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea was signed on October 21, 1994 between North Korea (DPRK) and the United States. ... A light water reactor or LWR is a thermal nuclear reactor that uses ordinary water, also called light water, as its neutron moderator. ... An oil tanker taking on bunker fuel. ... These pie-graphs showing the relative proportions of uranium-238 (blue) and uranium-235 (red) at different levels of enrichment. ... The Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) is an organization founded on March 15, 1995 by the United States, South Korea, and Japan to implement the 1994 Agreed Framework that froze North Koreas nuclear weapons program. ...


Enriched uranium

With the abandonment of its plutonium program, U.S. officials claimed North Korea began an enriched uranium program. Pakistan, through Abdul Qadeer Khan, supplied key technology and information to North Korea in exchange for missile technology around 1997, according to U.S. intelligence officials. Pakistani President Pervez Musharaf acknowledged in 2005 that Khan had provided centrifuges and their designs to North Korea.[4] Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan Dr. Abdul Qadeer Khan (Urdu: عبدالقدیر خان) (b. ... Intelligence (abbreviated or ) is the process and the result of gathering information and analyzing it to answer questions or obtain advance warnings needed to plan for the future. ...


This program was publicized in October 2002 when the United States asked North Korean officials about the program.[5] Under the Agreed Framework North Korea explicitly agreed to freeze plutonium programs (specifically, its "graphite moderated reactors and related facilities." The agreement also committed North Korea to implement the Joint Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, in which both Koreas committed not to have enrichment or reprocessing facilities. The United States argued North Korea violated its commitment not to have enrichment facilities.


In December 2002, the United States persuaded the KEDO Board to suspend fuel oil shipments, which led to the end of the Agreed Framework. North Korea responded by announcing plans to reactivate a dormant nuclear fuel processing program and power plant north of Pyongyang. North Korea soon thereafter expelled United Nations inspectors and withdrew from the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957. ...


In 2007 reports emanating from Washington suggested that the 2002 CIA reports that North Korea was developing uranium enrichment technology had overstated or misread the intelligence. U.S. officials were no longer making this a major issue in the six-party talks.[6][7][8] The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The six-party talks aim to find a peaceful resolution to the security concerns raised by the North Korean nuclear weapons program. ...


North Korea-United States relations

Main article: United States-North Korea relations

Even though U.S. President George W. Bush had named North Korea as part of an "Axis of Evil" following the September 11, 2001 attacks, U.S. officials stated that the United States was not planning any immediate military action. Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula North Korea joined the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) as a non-nuclear weapons state in 1985, and North and South Korean talks begun in 1990 resulted in a 1992 Denuclearization Statement. ... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Behind Enemy Lines II: Axis of Evil, see Behind Enemy Lines II. Bushs axis of evil includes Iran, Iraq, and North Korea (darker red). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


According to John Feffer, co-director of the think tank Foreign Policy in Focus, This article is about the institution. ...

The primary problem is that the current U.S. administration fundamentally doesn’t want an agreement with North Korea. The Bush administration considers the 1994 Agreed Framework to have been a flawed agreement. It doesn’t want be saddled with a similar agreement, for if it did sign one, it would then be open to charges of "appeasing" Pyongyang. The Vice President has summed up the approach as: "We don’t negotiate with evil, we defeat evil."[9]

American ire at North Korea is further inflamed by allegations of state-sponsored drug smuggling, money laundering, and wide scale counterfeiting. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... For other uses, see Counterfeit (disambiguation). ...


Diplomatic efforts at resolving the North Korean situation are complicated by the different goals and interests of the nations of the region. While none of the parties desire a North Korea with nuclear weapons, Japan and South Korea are especially concerned about North Korean counter-strikes following possible military action against North Korea. The People's Republic of China and South Korea are also very worried about the economic and social consequences should this situation cause the North Korean government to collapse. The politics of North Korea take place within a nominally democratic framework; in practice, North Korea functions as a single-party state. ...


In early 2000 the Zurich-based company ABB[10][11] was awarded the contract to provide the design and key components for two light-water nuclear reactors to North Korea.[12] ABB, formerly Asea Brown Boveri, is a multinational corporation headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, operating mainly in the power and automation technology areas. ...


Nuclear Deterrence

Some scholars and analysts have argued that North Korea is using nuclear weapons primarily as a political tool, particularly to bring the U.S. to the table to begin reestablishing normal relations and end the long-standing economic embargo against North Korea. A key point of this argument is the observation that the threat of nuclear weapons is the only thing that has brought the U.S. into serious negotiations. In a lecture in 1993, Bruce Cummings asserted that, based on information gathered by the CIA, the activity around the Yongbyon facility may have been done expressly to draw the attention of U.S. satellites. He also pointed out that the CIA had not claimed North Korea had nuclear weapons, but that they had enough material to create such weapons should they choose to do so.


North Korea’s energy supply has been deteriorating since the 1990s. Although North Korea's indigenous nuclear power capacity is insignificant, the two light-water moderated plants, if built, would be an important source of electricity in a nation with scarce resources. Although couched in a derisive statement, Donald Rumsfeld demonstrated the severe lack of electricity for the entire nation in a photograph released in October 2006.[13]


Another factor in this argument is that many parties have a vested interest in the claim that North Korea has nuclear weapons. For North Korea, it has been a bargaining tool for opening diplomatic discussions and receiving aid. The Grand National Party, currently the opposition party in South Korea, has made their disagreement with the Sunshine policy a major political wedge. Leading politicians in Japan have openly expressed a desire to remove Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution, and the threat of a nuclear-armed North Korea feeds into the perceived need for a larger standing army and defense force. The Bush administration in the United States has also made the threat of terrorism the central focus of foreign policy since the September 11, 2001 attacks. The U.S. also maintains a force of nearly 40,000 troops in South Korea, the second largest in East Asia,[14] that would likely have to be curtailed if the political situation changed significantly in Korea, something expected to negatively affect the U.S. sphere of influence in the region. The Grand National Party is a conservative, right-wing political party in South Korea. ... The Sunshine Policy is the current South Korean doctrine towards North Korea. ... Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution is a No War clause. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


On March 17, 2007, North Korea told delegates at international nuclear talks that it is preparing to shut down its main nuclear facility. The agreement was reached following a series of six-party talks, involving North Korea, South Korea, China, Russia, Japan, and the U.S, begun in 2003. According to the agreement, a list of its nuclear programs will be submitted and the nuclear facility will be disabled in exchange for fuel aid and normalization talks with the U.S. and Japan.[15] This had been delayed from April due to a dispute with the United States over Banco Delta Asia, but on July 14, IAEA inspectors confirm the shutdown of North Korea's Yongbyon nuclear reactor,[16] is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The six-party talks aim to find a peaceful resolution to the security concerns raised by the North Korean nuclear weapons program. ... Banco Delta Asia S.A.R.L. is a Macao-based bank, owned by the Delta Asia Financial Group, which has been in operation since 1935. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center[1] is North Koreas major nuclear facility, operating its first nuclear reactors. ...


Biological and chemical weapons

North Korea acceded to the Biological Weapons Convention in 1987, and the Geneva Protocol on January 4, 1989, but has not signed the Chemical Weapons Convention. The country is believed to possess a substantial arsenal of chemical weapons. It reportedly acquired the technology necessary to produce tabun and mustard gas as early as the 1950s,[17] and now possesses a full arsenal of nerve agents and other advanced varieties, with the means to launch them in artillery shells.[citation needed] North Korea has expended considerable resources on equipping its army with chemical-protection equipment.[citation needed] South Korea, however, has not felt the need to take such measures.[citation needed] Biological Weapons Convention Opened for signature April 10, 1972 at Moscow, Washington and London Entered into force March 26, 1975 Conditions for entry into force ??? Parties ??? The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (usually referred to... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare, usually called the Geneva Protocol, is a treaty prohibiting the use of chemical and biological weapons. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Chemical Weapons Convention Opened for signature January 13, 1993 in Paris Entered into force April 29, 1997 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by 50 states and the convening of a Preparatory Commission Parties 181 (as of Oct. ... Tabun or GA (Ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous military weapons. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ... Also known as Nerve agents, it is the term used for a type of chemical warfare substance that interferes with the transmission of nerve impulses. ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ...


Delivery systems

A Taepodong-1 missile fired in 1998.

North Korea's ability to deliver weapons of mass destruction to a hypothetical target is somewhat limited by its missile technology. As of 2005, North Korea's total range with its No Dong missiles is only 1,300 km, enough to reach South Korea, Japan, and parts of Russia and China, but not the United States or Europe. It is not known if this missile is actually capable of carrying the nuclear weapons North Korea has so far developed. BM-25 is a North Korean designed long-range ballistic missile with range capabilities of up to 1,550 miles (2493km), and potential of carrying a nuclear warhead. They have also developed the Taepodong-1 missile, which has a range of 2,000 km, but it is not yet in full deployment. With the development of the Taepodong-2 missile, with an expected range of 5,000-6,000 km,[18] North Korea could hypothetically deliver a warhead to almost all countries in Southeast Asia, and parts of Alaska or the continental United States. The Taepodong- 2 missile was tested on July 4, 2005, unsuccessfully. US intelligence estimates that the weapon will not be operational for another 11 years. The Taepodng- 2 could theoreticaly hit the western United States and other US interestes in the Western hemisphere. The current model of the Taepodong- 2 could not carry nuclear warheards to the United States. Former CIA director George Tenet has claimed that, with a light payload, Taepodong-2 could reach western parts of Continental United States, though with low accuracy.[19] There have been a number of North Korean missile tests. ... Image File history File links Taepodong1. ... Image File history File links Taepodong1. ... The Rodong-1 (spelled Nodong-1 in South Korea) is a single stage, mobile liquid propellant medium range ballistic missile developed by the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea). ... km redirects here. ... Taepodong-1 is a three-stage intermediate-range ballistic missile developed in North Korea and currently in service there. ... The Taepodong-2 (TD-2, also spelled as Taepo-dong 2[1]), (Korean: 대포동 2호) is a designation used to indicate a North Korean three-stage ballistic missile design that is the successor to the Taepodong-1. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and was previously the Director of Central Intelligence for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ...


References

  1. ^ USGS Recent Earth Quakes.
  2. ^ msnbc. Retrieved on 2006-11-26.
  3. ^ Global nuclear stockpiles, 1945-2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  4. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4180286.stm
  5. ^ BBC NEWS. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  6. ^ Carol Giacomo. "N.Korean uranium enrichment program fades as issue", Reuters, 10 February 2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-11. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Had Doubts on North Korean Uranium Drive", New York Times, March 1, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-03-01. 
  8. ^ "New Doubts On Nuclear Efforts by North Korea", Washington Post, March 1, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-03-01. 
  9. ^ Korea Is One: U.S. Talks with North Korea ’Set Up to Fail&#8217. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  10. ^ Board Election Results February 28, 1996.
  11. ^ ABB Group Annual Report 2000.
  12. ^ ABB to deliver systems, equipment to North Korean nuclear plants.
  13. ^ North Korea might now have The Bomb, but it doesn't have much electricity.
  14. ^ Tim Kane. Global U.S. Troop Deployment, 1950-2005. Retrieved on 2006-05-24.
  15. ^ N. Korea Plans to Shut Down Nuke Facility. March 17, 2007.
  16. ^ BBC. UN confirms N Korea nuclear halt. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  17. ^ North Korean Military Capabilities. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  18. ^ BBC NEWS. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.
  19. ^ C.I.A. Sees a North Korean Missile Threat. Retrieved on 2006-10-05.

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The foreign relations of North Korea are often tense and unpredictable. ... U.S.-North Korea relations developed primarily during the Korean War, but in recent years have been largely defined by the United States suspicions regarding North Koreas nuclear programs, and North Koreas perception of an imminent U.S. attack. ... This is a list of Wikipedia articles on Korea-related people, places, things, and concepts. ...

External links

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North Korea's Biochemical Weapons Threat - After Nuclear Test, Kim Jong Il's Toxic Arsenal - Popular Mechanics (856 words)
Internationally, it is widely agreed that the country is aggressively developing several weapons of mass destruction.
The weaponry is thought to have the potential to decimate North Korea's southern neighbor and the 28,000 U.S. troops stationed there, and to disrupt the regional economy.
NORTH KOREA'S CHEMICAL and Bioweapons (CBW) program appears to be modeled on that of the former Soviet Union, which covertly constructed a massive biological weapons infrastructure within the shell of a civilian research organization called Biopreparat.
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