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Encyclopedia > North Carolina General Assembly

The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. The General Assembly makes the laws of North Carolina, also known as the General Statutes. The General Assembly is a bicameral legislature, consisting of the North Carolina House of Representatives (formerly the North Carolina House of Commons) and the North Carolina Senate. The House has 120 members, while the Senate has 50.[1] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ...


Legislators in both chambers serve two-year terms. Starting with the 2002 election, each legislator represents a single-member House or Senatorial district; prior to 2002, some districts elected multiple legislators.


The General Assembly meets in the state capital of Raleigh (except for special occasions, when legislators might decide to hold a ceremonial session in some other city). It met in the Capitol building until 1963, when the legislature relocated to the new North Carolina State Legislative Building.[2] Nickname: Motto: You Can See the Whole State from Here Map of Wake County, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States State North Carolina County Wake County i Founded 1792 Government  - Mayor Charles Meeker (D) Area  - City  134. ... North Carolina State Capitol The North Carolina State Capitol is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

North Carolina Senate

Main article: North Carolina Senate

The Senate has 50 members. Though its members represent districts that are larger than those of their colleagues in the House, its prerogatives and powers are no greater. The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ...


The President of the Senate is the Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, but the Lt. Governor has very limited powers and only votes to break a tie. Before the office of Lt. Governor was created in 1868, the Senate was presided over by a "Speaker." After the 1988 election of James Carson Gardner, the first Republican Lt. Governor since Reconstruction, Democrats in control of the Senate shifted most of the power held by the Lt. Governor to the senator who is elected President Pro Tempore (or Pro-Tem). The President pro tempore appoints members to standing committees of the Senate, and holds great sway over bills. Marc Basnight (D-Manteo) is the current President pro tempore and has held the office longer than anyone in history. Based on the results of the November 2006 election, the Senate has a 31-19 Democratic majority in the 2007-2008 session, up from a 29-21 Democratic majority.[3] The Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina is the second highest elected official in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... James Carson Jim Gardner is a North Carolina businessman and politician who served as a U.S. Representative (1967-1969) and as Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina (1989-1993). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Pro tempore or pro tem is a latin phrase which best translates to for the time being in English. ... The President Pro Tempore (more commonly, Pro-Tem) of the North Carolina Senate is the highest-ranking (internally elected) officer of one house of the North Carolina General Assembly. ... Marc Basnight (born 13 May 1947) is a Democratic member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing the states first Senate district, including constituents in Beaufort, Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, Hyde, Pasquotank and Perquimans counties. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Manteo is a town in Dare County, North Carolina, United States. ...


The qualifications to be a senator are found in the state Constitution: "Each Senator, at the time of his election, shall be not less than 25 years of age, shall be a qualified voter of the State, and shall have resided in the State as a citizen for two years and in the district for which he is chosen for one year immediately preceding his election." The North Carolina Constitution governs the structure and function of the North Carolina state government. ...


According to the state constitution, the Senate is also the "Court for the Trial of Impeachments". The House of Representatives has the power to impeach state officials, after which the Senate holds a trial, as in the federal system. If the Governor or Lt. Governor is the official who has been impeached, the Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court presides. Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The Supreme Court of North Carolina is the states highest appellate court. ...


See also:

The President Pro Tempore (more commonly, Pro-Tem) of the North Carolina Senate is the highest-ranking (internally elected) officer of one house of the North Carolina General Assembly. ...

External link

North Carolina House of Representatives

The 120 members of the House are led by a Speaker, who holds powers similar to those of the Senate President pro-tem. Joe Hackney (D-Orange) is the current Speaker. The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. ... Rep. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Orange County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. ...


In 2005-2006, the Democratic Party held a 63-57 majority over the Republican Party in the House. Based on the results of the November 2006 election, the House has a 68-52 Democratic majority in the 2007-2008 session.[4] The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


The qualifications to be a member of the House are found in the state Constitution: "Each Representative, at the time of his election, shall be a qualified voter of the State, and shall have resided in the district for which he is chosen for one year immediately preceding his election." Elsewhere, the constitution specifies that no elected official shall be under twenty-one years of age and that no elected officials may deny the existence of God, although this provision is not enforced and violates the spirit of the "No religious test clause" of the United States Constitution. The North Carolina Constitution governs the structure and function of the North Carolina state government. ... The no religious test clause of the United States Constitution is cited by advocates of separation of church and state as an example of original intent of the Framers of the Constitution of avoiding any entanglement between church and state, or involving the government in any way as a determiner... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


See also:

The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. ...

External link

History

The British colony of Carolina (under the control of the “Lords Proprietors” before becoming a royal province in 1729) had a unicameral legislature from approximately 1666 to 1697, consisting of the Governor, his council, and representatives of various precincts and towns, elected by male freeholders. By 1697, this evolved into a bicameral body, with the Governor and his council as the upper house, and the House of Burgesses as the elected lower house. The House, sometimes known simply as “the Assembly,” could only meet when called by the Governor, but it was allowed to set its own rules and to elect its own Speaker. It also controlled the salary of the Governor, and withheld that salary when the Governor displeased a majority of the House. Naturally, conflicts between the Governor and the legislature were frequent. In 1774 and 1775, the people of the colony elected a provincial Congress, independent of the royal governor, as the American Revolution began. Most of its members were also members of what would be the last House of Burgesses. Lord Proprietor was a colonial title for the rulers of certain British colonies in America, such as Maryland or Carolina. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... // List of Governors Roanake Colony, 1585 - 1586 Ralph Lane, 1585 - 1586 John White, 1587 Proprietary Colony, 1664-1731 Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689 William Drummond 1664-1667 Samuel Stephens 1667-1669 Peter Carteret 1670-1672 John Jenkins 1672-1675 Thomas Eastchurch 1675-1676 John Jenkins 1676-1677 Thomas Miller 1677... Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... The North Carolina Provincial Congresses were extra-legal unicameral legislative bodies formed in 1774 through 1776 by the people of the Province of North Carolina, independent of the British colonial government. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that...


There would be five Provincial Congresses. The fifth Congress approved the first constitution (1776). Because of the history of distrust of the executive, the constitution firmly established the General Assembly, as it was now called, as the most powerful organ of the state. The bicameral legislature, whose members would all be elected by the people, would itself elect all the officers of the executive and judicial branches. As William S. Powell wrote in North Carolina: A History, “The legislative branch henceforth would have the upper hand. The governor would be the creature of the assembly, elected by it and removable by it….The governor could not take any important step without the advice and consent of the 'council of state,' and he had no voice in the appointment or removal of [council of state members].” This constitution was not submitted to a vote of the people. The Congress simply adopted it and elected Richard Caswell, the last president of the Congress, as acting Governor until the new legislature was elected and seated. The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Categories: Historical stubs | 1729 births | 1789 deaths | Continental Congressmen | Governors of North Carolina ...


The new General Assembly, which first convened in April 1777, consisted of a Senate, which had one member from each county (regardless of population), and a House of Commons, which had two members representing each county, plus one each from certain towns. Only land-owning (100 acres for the House of Commons, 300 acres for the Senate), Protestant men could serve. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


In 1835, the constitution was amended to make the Governor elected by the people, but the legislature still elected all other officials. Amendments also set the number of senators at 50 and the number of commoners at 120. Senators would now be elected by districts representing approximately equal numbers of citizens, rather than by counties. Members of the House were still elected by county, but more populous counties were entitled to more representatives.


In 1868, a new constitution changed the name of the House of Commons to the House of Representatives. It also established the office of Lieutenant Governor. Previously, the Speaker of the Senate was the constitutional successor to the Governor in case of death or resignation. Property qualifications for holding office were also abolished. Finally, the power to elect executive officers and judges was taken from legislators and given to the people.


Starting in 1966 (in the wake of Reynolds v. Sims), members of the House of Representatives were elected from districts, much as senators already were. This left some counties without a resident member of the legislature for the first time in state history. Reynolds v. ...


In 1868, African Americans were first elected to the General Assembly (fifteen representatives and two senators). But after Democrats consolidated power in the late 1890s, no African Americans were elected until Henry Frye (a Democrat) in 1968. African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Henry E. Frye is an American judge and politician who concluded his public-service career as the first African-American chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ...


Lillian Exum Clement became the first female member of the General Assembly in 1921. [5] Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Sessions

The General Assembly meets in regular session (or the "long session") beginning in January of each odd-numbered year, and adjourns to reconvene the following even-numbered year for what is called the "Short Session," though there is no limit on the length of any session.[1]


Occasionally, in the case of a special need, the Governor may call a Special Session of the General Assembly after they have adjourned for the year.


According to the state-published 2002 North Carolina Manual (no longer available online), "Prior to 1957, the General Assembly convened in January at a time fixed by the Constitution of North Carolina. From 1957 through 1967, sessions convened in February at a time fixed by the Constitution. The 1969 General Assembly was the first to convene on a date fixed by law after elimination of the constitutionally fixed date. The assembly now convenes on the third Wednesday after the second Monday in January after the November election."

  • North Carolina General Assembly of 1899-1900
  • North Carolina General Assembly of 2001-2002
  • North Carolina General Assembly of 2003-2004
  • North Carolina General Assembly of 2005-2006
  • North Carolina General Assembly of 2007-2008

The North Carolina General Assembly of 1777 met in two sessions in New Bern, North Carolina, from April 7 to May 9, 1777, and from November 15 to December 24, 1777. ... The North Carolina General Assembly of 1778 met in three sessions in three locations in the years 1778 and 1779. ... The North Carolina General Assembly of 1779 met in three sessions in three locations in the years 1779 and 1780. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly for the 1899-1900 session were elected in November 1898. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly, 2001-2002 session were elected in November 2000. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly, 2003-2004 session were elected in November 2002. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly, 2005-2006 session were elected in November 2004. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly, 2007-2008 session were elected in November 2006. ...

Elections

Elections for all seats in both houses are held in each even-numbered year. If a seat should become vacant between elections, there are no by-elections or special elections. Rather, the local leaders of the political party of the person who vacated the seat nominate a replacement, to serve until the next election. The Governor, ordinarily, accepts the nomination, and appoints that person. A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office that has become vacant between general elections. ...

Note that until 1982, a legislator's term in office was said to begin immediately upon his or her election. Since then, however, terms begin on January 1 after a legislator's election. The North Carolina General Assembly election, 2002 was the first General Assembly election conducted using districts drawn following the 2000 Census. ... Portions of this article or section may be outdated. ...


External links

Reference

  1. ^ a b Structure of the North Carolina General Assembly. Official North Carolina General Assembly Website. Retrieved on 2006-07-23.
  2. ^ State Capitol of NC. NC Department of Cultural Resources. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  3. ^ http://www.ncleg.net/DocumentSites/SenateDocuments/2006%20Election%20Documents/Unofficial%20Results%20for%20the%202007%20Senate%20-%20General%20Election.pdf
  4. ^ http://www.ncleg.net/DocumentSites/HouseDocuments/Election%20Documents/Unofficial%20Listing%20General%20Election%20Results%20for%202007%20NC%20House%20of%20Representatives.pdf
  5. ^ http://www.ncleg.net/LegLibrary/WomenInTheGA.pdf

  Results from FactBites:
 
North Carolina General Assembly - (0 words)
The member appointed by the General Assembly upon the recommendation of the President Pro Tempore of the Senate who is involved with a professional employer organization.
A licensee is the employer of an assigned employee for purposes of Chapters 95, 96 and 105 of the General Statutes.
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North Carolina General Assembly - General Statutes (236 words)
While every effort was made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the statutes available on the North Carolina General Assembly's web site, the North Carolina General Assembly will not be responsible for any errors or omissions which may occur in these files.
NCGA Web Site Support will relay the information to appropriate staff members of the North Carolina General Assembly to investigate the irregularities.
The North Carolina General Assembly offers access to the Statutes on the Internet as a service to the public.
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