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Encyclopedia > North Carolina
State of North Carolina
Flag of North Carolina State seal of North Carolina
Flag Seal
Nickname(s): Tar Heel State; Old North State
Motto(s): Esse quam videri

(Latin: To be, rather than to seem) Image File history File links Flag_of_North_Carolina. ... State seal of North Carolina. ... The flag of North Carolina is defined by law as follows That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a blue union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the right of... The Great Seal of North Carolina was standardized in design by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1971: The Governor shall procure of the State a Seal, which shall be called the great seal of the State of North Carolina, and shall be two and one-quarter inches in diameter... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Image of Tar Heel logo used by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tar Heel is a nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina, as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills athletic teams (see North Carolina Tar Heels). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Esse quam videri is a Latin phrase meaning To be, rather than to seem. It has been used as motto by a number of different groups. ...

Official language(s) English
Demonym North Carolinian
Capital Raleigh
Largest city Charlotte
Largest metro area Charlotte metro area
Area  Ranked 28th in the US
 - Total 53,865 sq mi
(139,509 km²)
 - Width 150 miles (340 km)
 - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)
 - % water 9.5
 - Latitude 33° 50′ N to 36° 35′ N
 - Longitude 75° 28′ W to 84° 19′ W
Population  Ranked 10th in the US
 - Total 8,049,313
 - Density 165.24/sq mi 
63.80/km² (17th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mt. Mitchell[2]
6,684 ft  (2,038 m)
 - Mean 705 ft  (215 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[2]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  November 21, 1789 (12th)
Governor Mike Easley (D)
Lieutenant Governor Beverly Perdue (D)
U.S. Senators Elizabeth Dole (R)
Richard Burr (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations NC US-NC
Website www.nc.gov
North Carolina Portal

North Carolina (IPA: /ˌnɔrθˌkɛrəˈlaɪnə/) is a state located on the Atlantic Seaboard in the southeastern United States. The capital is Raleigh. Image File history File links Map_of_USA_NC.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): North Carolina ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Counties most commonly associated with the Charlote Metro area are in dark red, counties often included are light red, and counties sometimes included are in orange. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... A view from the observation tower. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Michael Francis (Mike) Easley (born March 23, 1950) is the current governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Beverly Eaves Bev Perdue (Born January 14, 1947 [1] in Grundy, Virginia) is the current lieutenant governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina and President of the North Carolina State Senate. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from North Carolina to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Categories: US geography stubs ... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...


North Carolina was one of the original Thirteen Colonies, originally known as Carolina, and the home of the first English colony in the Americas.[3] On 20 May 1861, it became the last of the Confederate states to secede from the Union, and was readmitted on 4 July 1868. It was also the location of the first successful controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air flight, by the Wright brothers, at Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk in 1903. Today, it is a fast-growing state with an increasingly diverse economy and population. As of 1 July 2007, the population estimate is 9,061,032 (a 12% increase since 1 April 2000).[4] In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... , Roanoke Island is an island in Dare County near the coast of North Carolina, United States. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Wright brothers, Orville (19 August 1871 – 30 January 1948) and Wilbur (16 April 1867 – 30 May 1912), were two Americans who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing and building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human... Kill Devil Hills is a town located in Dare County, North Carolina. ... Kitty Hawk is a town located in Dare County, North Carolina. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


North Carolina has a wide range of elevations, from sea level on the coast to almost 6,700 feet (2,042 m) in the mountains. The climate in the coastal and Piedmont regions of eastern and central North Carolina is similar to other southern states such as Georgia and South Carolina, while the climate in the western mountains is closer to that found in New England or the upper Midwest. While the coastal plains, especially the tidewater areas, are strongly influenced by the Atlantic Ocean, the western, mountainous part of the state is more than 300 miles (500 km) from the coast, resulting in considerably less maritime influence. As such, the climate of the state ranges from a warm, humid subtropical climate near the coast to a humid continental climate in the mountains. Most of the state falls in the humid subtropical zone. The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ...

Contents

Geography

See also: Geography of the United States, East Coast of the United States, Geography of North Carolina, and List of counties in North Carolina
Stream within a Linville community
The Blue Ridge Mountains in the foreground with Grandfather Mountain in the extreme background as seen from Blowing Rock, NC.
The Blue Ridge Mountains in the foreground with Grandfather Mountain in the extreme background as seen from Blowing Rock, NC.
The Western North Carolina mountains as seen from Sunset Rock in Highlands, North Carolina.
The Western North Carolina mountains as seen from Sunset Rock in Highlands, North Carolina.
Bodie Island Lighthouse, one of the Outer Banks attractions.
Bodie Island Lighthouse, one of the Outer Banks attractions.

North Carolina is bordered by South Carolina on the south, Georgia on the southwest, Tennessee on the west, Virginia on the north, and the Atlantic Ocean on the east. The United States Census Bureau classifies North Carolina as a southern state in the subcategory of being one of the South Atlantic States.

The United States is a nation in the Western Hemisphere. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Geography of North Carolina, a state of the United States, falls naturally into three divisions or sections -- the Appalachian Mountains formed mostly by the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains, the Middle or Piedmont Plateau, and the Eastern or Tidewater section, also known as the Coastal Plain. ... List of North Carolina counties: Alamance County Alexander County Alleghany County Anson County Ashe County Avery County Beaufort County Bertie County Bladen County Brunswick County Buncombe County Burke County Cabarrus County Caldwell County Camden County Carteret County Caswell County Catawba County Chatham County Cherokee County Chowan County Clay County Cleveland... Linville is a community in Avery County. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blowing Rock is a rocky outcropping, at the town of Blowing Rock, North Carolina, above a gorge in Caldwell County, in the northwest of that... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 478 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Blowing Rock is a rocky outcropping, at the town of Blowing Rock, North Carolina, above a gorge in Caldwell County, in the northwest of that... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The Grandfather Mountain mile high swinging bridge Grandfather Mountain is a mountain near Linville, North Carolina. ... Blowing Rock is a town in North Carolina, situated in both Caldwell and Watauga counties. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 899 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The skyline of Highlands seen from Sunset Rock. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 899 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The skyline of Highlands seen from Sunset Rock. ... The counties most commonly associated with Western North Carolina. ... Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... Highlands is an incorporated town located on a plateau in the southern Appalachian mountains, within the Nantahala National Forest, in Macon County, North Carolina (a small annexed portion also being in neighboring Jackson County). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (896x600, 138 KB) Summary Outer Banks, North Carolina. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (896x600, 138 KB) Summary Outer Banks, North Carolina. ... Bodie Island Lighthouse (467x700) Bodie Island Lighthouse and Keepers Quarters (700x467) The current Bodie Island lighthouse is the third that has stood in this vicinity of North Carolina. ... North Carolinas Outer Banks separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Albemarle Sound (north) and Pamlico Sound (south). ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ...

North Carolina topographic map
North Carolina topographic map


North Carolina consists of three main geographic sections: the coastal plain, which occupies the eastern 45% of the state; the Piedmont region, which contains the middle 35%; and the Appalachian Mountains and foothills. The extreme eastern section of the state contains The Outer Banks, a string of sandy, narrow islands which form a barrier between the Atlantic Ocean and inland waterways. The Outer Banks form two sounds—Albemarle Sound in the north and Pamlico Sound in the south. They are the two largest landlocked sounds in the United States. Immediately inland, the coastal plain is relatively flat, with rich soils ideal for growing tobacco, soybeans, melons, and cotton. The coastal plain is North Carolina's most rural section, with few large towns or cities. Agriculture remains an important industry. The major rivers of this section, the Neuse River, Tar River, Pamlico River, and the Cape Fear River, tend to be slow-moving and wide. Download high resolution version (1086x409, 109 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1086x409, 109 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Atlantic Coastal Plain is the rather flat stretch of land that borders the Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico). ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... The Foothills in the U.S. state of North Carolina is a region of transistional terrain between the Piedmont Plateau and the Appalachian Mountains. ... North Carolinas Outer Banks separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Albemarle Sound (north) and Pamlico Sound (south). ... Albemarle Sound with the northern Outer Banks. ... Pamlico Sound with the southern Outer Banks. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... This article is about the fruits called melons. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... A bridge over the Neuse River at New Bern, where it empties into the Pamlico Sound. ... The Tar River is a river that is approximately 346 kilometers (215 miles) long, of northeast North Carolina flowing generally southeast to an estuary of Pamlico Sound. ... History Located in the city of Washington, North Carolina, the Pamlico River was a key strategic position during the American Civil War. ... The Cape Fear River at Smith Creek in Wilmington, NC. The Cape Fear River is a 202-mile (325 km) long blackwater river in east central North Carolina in the United States. ...


The coastal plain transitions to the Piedmont region along the "fall line", a line which marks the elevation at which waterfalls first appear on streams and rivers. The Piedmont region of central North Carolina is the state's most urbanized and densely populated section - all five of the state's largest cities are located in the Piedmont. It consists of gently rolling countryside frequently broken by hills or low mountain ridges. A number of small, isolated, and deeply eroded mountain ranges and peaks are located in the Piedmont, including the Sauratown Mountains, Pilot Mountain, the Uwharrie Mountains, Crowder's Mountain, King's Pinnacle, the Brushy Mountains, and the South Mountains. The Piedmont ranges from about 300–400 feet (90–120 m) elevation in the east to over 1,000 feet (300 m) in the west. Due to the rapid population growth of the Piedmont, many of the farms and much of the rural countryside in this region is being replaced by suburbanization - shopping centers, housing developments, and large corporate office parks. Agriculture is steadily declining in importance in this region. The major rivers of the Piedmont, such as the Yadkin and Catawba, tend to be fast-flowing, shallow, and narrow. The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... The Sauratown Mountains are an isolated mountain range located within Stokes and Surry counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The distinctive Big Pinnacle of Pilot Mountain. ... The Uwharrie Mountains are an ancient coastal mountain range located in present day North Carolina. ... Crowders Mountain is one of two main peaks within Crowders Mountain State Park, the other peak being Kings Pinnacle. ... Kings Pinnacle is one of the two main peaks located within Crowders Mountain State Park. ... The Brushy Mountains are a mountain range located in northwestern North Carolina. ... The South Mountains are an ancient and deeply eroded mountain range in western North Carolina. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Suburbanisation is a term used by many to describe the current social urban dynamic operating within many parts of the developed world and is related to the phenomenon of urban sprawl. ... The Yadkin River at Elkin, North Carolina The Yadkin River is the second longest river in North Carolina, surpassed only by the Cape Fear. ... The Catawba River is a tributary of the Wateree River, approximately 220 mi (354 km) long, in the U.S. states of North Carolina and South Carolina. ...


The western section of the state is part of the Appalachian Mountain range. Among the subranges of the Appalachians located in the state are the Great Smoky Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, Great Balsam Mountains, Pisgah Mountains, and the Black Mountains. The Black Mountains are the highest in the Eastern United States, and culminate in Mount Mitchell at 6,684 feet (2,037 m).[2] It is the highest point east of the Mississippi River. Although agriculture remains important, tourism has become the dominant industry in the mountains. One agricultural pursuit which has prospered and grown in recent decades is the growing and selling of Christmas Trees. Due to the higher altitude in the mountains, the climate often differs starkly from the rest of the state. Winters in western North Carolina typically feature significant snowfall and subfreezing temperatures more akin to a midwestern state than a southern one. The counties most commonly associated with Western North Carolina. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of North American mountains, partly in Canada, but mostly in the United States, forming a zone, from 100 to 300 miles wide, running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, 1... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... Great Balsam Mountains or Balsam Mountains are in the mountain region of western North Carolina, United States. ... Before the European Settlers entered this part of North Carolina, these mountains and valleys were the exclusive domain of Cherokee Indians. ... The Black Mountains are a part of the great Appalachian Mountain range. ... A view from the observation tower. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Tourist redirects here. ... A Christmas tree in a German home One of the most popular traditions associated with the celebration of Christmas, the Christmas tree is normally an evergreen conifer tree that is brought in the house or used in the open, and is decorated with Christmas lights and colourful ornaments during the...


North Carolina has 17 major river basins. Five of the state's river basins - the Hiwassee, Little Tennessee, French Broad, Watauga and New - are part of the Mississippi River Basin, which drains to the Gulf of Mexico. All the others flow to the Atlantic Ocean. Of the 17 basins, 11 originate within the state of North Carolina, but only four are contained entirely within the state's borders - the Cape Fear, Neuse, White Oak and Tar-Pamlico.[5] For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of North Carolina

The geographical divisions of North Carolina are useful when discussing the climate of the state.


The coastal plain is influenced by the Atlantic Ocean which keeps temperatures mild in winter and moderate in the summer. Daytime high temperatures on the coast average less than 89 °F (31.6 °C) during the summer. In the winter, the coast has the mildest temperatures in the state, with daytime temperatures rarely dropping below 40 °F (4.4 °C); the average daytime winter temperature in the coastal plain is usually in the mid-60's. Temperatures in the coastal plain rarely drop below freezing even at night. The coastal plain usually receives only one inch (2.5 cm) of snow and/or ice annually, and in some years there may be no snow or ice at all. For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...


The Atlantic Ocean has less influence on the Piedmont region, and as a result the Piedmont has hotter summers and colder winters than the coast. Daytime highs in the Piedmont usually average over 90 °F (32.2 °C) in the summer. While it is not common for temperatures to reach over 100 °F (37.8 °C) in North Carolina, when it happens, the highest temperatures are to be found in the lower areas of the Piedmont, especially around the city of Fayetteville. Additionally, the weaker influence of the Atlantic Ocean means that temperatures in the Piedmont often fluctuate more widely than the coast. Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ...


In the winter, the Piedmont is much less mild than the coast, with daytime temperatures that are usually in the mid 50's, and temperatures often drop below freezing at night. The region averages from 3-5 inches of snowfall annually in the Charlotte area to 6-8 inches in the Raleigh-Durham area. The Piedmont is especially notorious for sleet and freezing rain. It can be heavy enough in some storms to snarl traffic and collapse trees and power lines. Annual precipitation and humidity is lower in the Piedmont than either the mountains or the coast, but even at its lowest, the precipitation is a generous 40 in (102 cm) per year. Sleet is a term used in a variety of ways to describe precipitation intermediate between rain and snow but distinct from hail. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ...


The Appalachian Mountains are the coolest area of the state, with daytime temperatures averaging in the low 40's and upper 30's for highs in the winter and often falling into the teens (−9 °C) or lower in winter nights. Relatively cool summers have temperatures rarely rising above 80 °F (26.7 °C). Snowfall in the mountains is usually 14–20 in (36–51 cm) per year, but it is often greater in the higher elevations. For example, during the Blizzard of 1993 more than 50 inches (130 cm) of snow fell on Mount Mitchell. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... ... Mount Mitchell can refer to: Mount Mitchell in Jasper National Park of Canada Mount Mitchell in North Carolina, the highest point in eastern North America Mount Mitchell in Oregon Mount Mitchell in Washington Mount Mitchell in Queensland, Australia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages...


Severe weather is not a rare event in North Carolina. On average, the state receives a direct hit from a hurricane once a decade. Tropical storms arrive every 3 or 4 years. In some years several hurricanes or tropical storms can directly hit the state or brush across the coastal areas. Only Florida and Louisiana are hit by hurricanes more often. On average, North Carolina has 50 days of thunderstorm activity per year, with some storms becoming severe enough to produce hail and damaging winds. Although many people believe that hurricanes only menace coastal areas, the rare hurricane which moves inland quickly enough can cause severe damage. In 1989 Hurricane Hugo caused heavy damage in Charlotte and even as far inland as the Blue Ridge Mountains in the northwestern part of the state. North Carolina averages less than 20 tornadoes per year. Many of these are produced by hurricanes or tropical storms along the coastal plain. Tornadoes from thunderstorms are a risk, especially in the eastern part of the state. The western piedmont is often protected by the mountains breaking storms up as they try to cross over them. The storms will often reform farther east. Also a weather feature known as cold air damming occurs in the western part of the state . This can also weaken storms but can also lead to major ice events in winter ."[6] Lowest pressure 918 mbar (hPa; 27. ... Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ...

Monthly normal high and low temperatures (Fahrenheit) for various North Carolina cities.
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Asheville 46/26 50/28 58/35 66/42 74/51 80/58 83/63 82/62 76/55 67/43 57/35 49/29
Cape Hatteras 54/39 55/39 60/44 68/52 75/60 82/68 85/73 85/72 81/68 73/59 65/50 57/43
Charlotte 51/32 56/34 64/42 73/49 80/58 87/66 90/71 88/69 82/63 73/51 63/42 54/35
Greensboro 47/28 52/31 60/38 70/46 77/55 84/64 88/68 86/67 79/60 70/48 60/39 51/31
Raleigh 50/30 54/32 62/39 72/46 79/55 86/64 89/68 87/67 81/61 72/48 62/40 53/33
Wilmington 56/36 60/38 66/44 74/51 81/60 86/68 90/72 88/71 84/66 76/54 68/45 60/38
[3]

For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

History

History of North Carolina For the state today see North Carolina // Bibliography Surveys James Clay and Douglas Orr, eds. ...

Native Americans, The Lost Colony and Permanent Settlement

North Carolina was originally inhabited by many different native peoples, including the Cherokee, Tuscarora, Cheraw, Pamlico, Meherrin, Coree, Machapunga, Cape Fear Indians, Waxhaw, Saponi, Tutelo, Waccamaw, Coharie, and Catawba. In 1584, Elizabeth I, granted a charter to Sir Walter Raleigh, for whom the state capital is named, for land in present-day North Carolina (then Virginia).[7] Raleigh established two colonies on the coast in the late 1580s, both ending in failure. It was the second American territory the British attempted to colonize. The demise of one, the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke Island, remains one of the great mysteries of American history. Virginia Dare, the first English child to be born in North America, was born on Roanoke Island on August 18, 1587. Dare County is named for her. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (426x700, 109 KB)Sir Walter Raleigh and his Son by an Unknown Artist, 1602. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (426x700, 109 KB)Sir Walter Raleigh and his Son by an Unknown Artist, 1602. ... Alternatively, Professor Walter Raleigh was a scholar and author circa 1900. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... , Roanoke Island is an island in Dare County near the coast of North Carolina, United States. ... This page contains special characters. ... The Tuscarora are an American Indian tribe originally in North Carolina, which moved north to New York, and then partially into Canada. ... The Cheraw (variously called Charaw, Charraw, Sara, Saraw, Saura, Suali, Sualy, Xualla, or Xuala), were a tribe of Siouan-speaking Amerindians first encountered by Hernando De Soto in 1540 and subsequently disappeared after 1768. ... The Pamlico were a Native American people of North Carolina, U.S.A.. They spoke Algonquian. ... The Meherrin Tribe is one of eight state-recognized tribes of Native Americans in North Carolina and received formal state recognition in 1986. ... The Coree were a Native American tribe, now disappeared, who once occupied a coastal area of eastern North Carolina. ... The Machapunga were a very small Native American tribe of Algonquian descent, now disappeared, who once occupied a coastal area of northeastern North Carolina, living in a village called Mattamuskeet on the shore of Lake Mattamuskeet. ... The Cape Fear Indians is an extinct (in early 19th century) tribe on Cape Fear River, now Carolina Beach State Park, North Carolina. ... The Waxhaws is the name of both an extinct American Indian tribe and of a geographical area bordering North and South Carolina to the Southeast of the city of Charlotte, N.C. Waxhaws: the American Indian tribe The tribe became extinct due to a smallpox epidemic in the early 1700s... Saponi is the name of one of the eastern Siouan tribes, related to the Tutelo, Occaneechi, Monacan and other eastern Siouan peoples, whose original homeland is in North Carolina and Virginia. ... TUTELO is a name classification referring to Indians who historically resided from the eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia down to the valleys of the Mayo and Dan Rivers in North Carolina. ... Waccamaw Siouan Indians are one of eight state recognized Native American tribal nations in North Carolina. ... The Coharie are a Native American Tribe who descend from the Neusiok Indians on the Little Coharie River, in Sampson and Harnett County, North Carolina. ... For other uses, see Catawba. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Alternatively, Professor Walter Raleigh was a scholar and author circa 1900. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lost Colony is a new MMOFPS (Massivly Multiplayer Online First Person Shooter Game) developed by Red Planet, LLC. It is currently in Beta Testing and will be released early January. ... , Roanoke Island is an island in Dare County near the coast of North Carolina, United States. ... Virginia Dare (born August 18, 1587) was the first child born in the Americas to English parents, Eleanor (or Ellinor/Elyonor) and Ananias Dare. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Location in the state of North Carolina Formed 1870 Seat Manteo Area  - Total  - Water 4,044 km² (1,562 mi²) 3,051 km² (1,178 mi²) 75. ...

Main article: Province of Carolina

As early as 1650, colonists from the Virginia colony moved into the area of Albemarle Sound. By 1663, Charles II granted a charter to establish a new colony on the North American continent which generally established its borders. He named it Carolina in honor of his father Charles I. [8] By 1665, a second charter was issued to attempt to resolve territorial questions. In 1710, due to disputes over governance, the Carolina colony began to split into North Carolina and South Carolina. The latter became a crown colony in 1729. The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... Albemarle Sound with the northern Outer Banks. ... The name Charles II is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings Charles the Fat (also known as Charles II of France and Charles III of the Holy Roman Empire) Charles II of England Charles II of Naples Charles II of Navarre Charles II of Romania Charles II... The name Charles I is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland Charles I of France (also known as Charles the Bald) Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the German Empire) Charles I of Romania Charles I... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...


Colonial Period and Revolutionary War

The first permanent European settlers of North Carolina were British colonists who migrated south from Virginia, following a rapid growth of the colony and the subsequent shortage of available farmland. Nathaniel Batts was documented as one of the first of these Virginian migrants. He settled south of the Chowan River and east of the Great Dismal Swamp in 1655.[9] By 1663, this northeastern area of the Province of Carolina, known as the Albemarle Settlements, was undergoing full-scale British settlement.[10] During the same period, the English monarch Charles II gave the province to the Lords Proprietors, a group of noblemen who had helped restore Charles to the throne in 1660. The new province of "Carolina" was named in honor and memory of King Charles I (Latin: Carolus). In 1712, North Carolina became a separate colony. With the exception of the Earl Granville holdings, it became a royal colony seventeen years later.[11] This article is about military actions only. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Nathaniel Batts was a fur trader. ... The Chowan River is a blackwater river formed with the merging of Virginias Blackwater and Nottoway rivers near the stateline between Virginia and North Carolina. ... The Great Dismal Swamp is located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Lord Proprietor was a colonial title for the rulers of certain British colonies in America, such as Maryland or Carolina. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scots and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution. ... The Right Honourable John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, PC (22 April 1690–22 January 1763), English statesman, commonly known by his earlier title as Lord Carteret, was the son of George Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1667 - 1695), by his marriage with Grace Granville (September 3, 1654 - October 18, 1744), daughter...


Differences in the settlement patterns of eastern and western North Carolina, or the low country and uplands, affected the political, economic, and social life of the state from the eighteenth until the twentieth century. The Tidewater in eastern North Carolina was settled chiefly by immigrants from England and the Scottish Highlands. The upcountry of western North Carolina was settled chiefly by Scots-Irish and German Protestants, the so-called "cohee". Arriving during the mid-to-late 18th century, the Scots-Irish were the largest immigrant group from the British Isles before the Revolution. During the Revolutionary War, the English and Highland Scots of eastern North Carolina tended to remain loyal to the British Crown, because of longstanding business and personal connections with Great Britain. The Scots-Irish and German settlers of western North Carolina tended to favor American independence from Britain. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Tuckahoe was a term used during the 18th and 19th centuries to describe a cultural group, i. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


Most of the English colonists arrived as indentured servants, hiring themselves out as laborers for a fixed period to pay for their passage. In the early years the line between indentured servants and African slaves or laborers was fluid. Some Africans were allowed to earn their freedom before slavery became a lifelong status. Most of the free colored families formed in North Carolina before the Revolution were descended from relationships or marriages between free white women and enslaved or free African or African-American men. Many had migrated or were descendants of migrants from colonial Virginia.[12] As the flow of indentured laborers to the colony decreased with improving economic conditions in Great Britain, more slaves were imported and the state's restrictions on slavery hardened. The economy's growth and prosperity was based on slave labor, devoted first to the production of tobacco. An indentured servant (also called a bonded laborer) is a labourer unde from the employer in exchange for an extension to the period of their indenture, which could thereby continue indefinitely. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock...


On April 12, 1776, the colony became the first to instruct its delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for independence from the British crown, through the Halifax Resolves passed by the North Carolina Provincial Congress. The dates of both of these independence-related events are memorialized on the state flag and state seal.[13] Throughout the Revolutionary War, fierce guerilla warfare erupted between bands of pro-independence and pro-British colonists. In some cases the war was also an excuse to settle private grudges and rivalries. A major American victory in the war took place at King's Pinnacle along the North Carolina-South Carolina border. On October 7, 1780 a force of 1000 mountain men from western North Carolina (including what is today the State of Tennessee) overwhelmed a force of some 1000 British troops led by Major Patrick Ferguson. Most of the British soldiers in this battle were Carolinians who had remained loyal to the British Crown (they were called "Tories"). The American victory at Kings Mountain gave the advantage to colonists who favored American independence, and it prevented the British Army from recruiting new soldiers from the Tories. is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... The Halifax Resolves is the name later given to a resolution adopted by North Carolinas Fourth Provincial Congress in Halifax County on April 12, 1776. ... The North Carolina Provincial Congresses were extra-legal unicameral legislative bodies formed in 1774 through 1776 by the people of the Province of North Carolina, independent of the British colonial government. ... The flag of North Carolina is defined by law as follows That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a blue union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the right of... The Great Seal of North Carolina was standardized in design by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1971: The Governor shall procure of the State a Seal, which shall be called the great seal of the State of North Carolina, and shall be two and one-quarter inches in diameter... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... Kings Pinnacle is one of the two main peaks located within Crowders Mountain State Park. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Patrick Ferguson (1744–1780), was a British Army officer, rifle-designer, and early advocate of light infantry. ...


The road to Yorktown and America's independence from Great Britain led through North Carolina. As the British Army moved north from victories in Charleston and Camden, South Carolina, the Southern Division of the Continental Army and local militia prepared to meet them. Following General Daniel Morgan's victory over the British Cavalry Commander Banastre Tarleton at the Battle of Cowpens on January 17, 1781, southern commander Nathanael Greene led British Lord Charles Cornwallis across the heartland of North Carolina, and away from Cornwallis's base of supply in Charleston, South Carolina. This campaign is known as "The Race to the Dan" or "The Race for the River."[14] York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Camden is a city in Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... Daniel Morgan (July 6, 1736 – July 6, 1802) was an American pioneer, soldier, and United States Representative from Virginia. ... Lieutenant-Colonel Banastre Tarleton by Sir Joshua Reynolds General Sir Banastre Tarleton, 1st Baronet, GCB (21 August 1754 – 25 January 1833) was a British soldier and politician. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders Daniel Morgan Banastre Tarleton Strength c. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the American Revolutionary War hero. ... Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis (December 31, 1738-October 5, British general and colonial governor. ...


Generals Greene and Cornwallis finally met at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in present-day Greensboro on March 15, 1781. Although the British troops held the field at the end of the battle, their casualties at the hands of the numerically superior American Army were crippling. Following this "Pyhrric victory", Cornwallis chose to move to the Virginia coastline to get reinforcements, and to allow the Royal Navy to protect his battered army. This decision would result in Cornwallis's eventual defeat at Yorktown, Virginia later in 1781. The Patriots' victory there guaranteed American independence. The Battle of Guilford Courthouse was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present-day booming metropolis of Greensboro, North Carolina, during the American Revolutionary War in which 1,900 British troops under General Charles Cornwallis fought an American force under Rhode Island native General Nathanael Greene numbering... Greensboro redirects here. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A Pyrrhic victory is a victory with devastating cost to the victor. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ...


Antebellum Period

On November 21, 1789, North Carolina became the twelfth state to ratify the Constitution. In 1840, it completed the state capitol building in Raleigh, still standing today. Unlike many other Southern states, North Carolina never developed a dominant slaveholding aristocracy, and middle-class yeomen tended to control the state government. Most of North Carolina's slaveowners and large plantations were located in the eastern Tidewater. Western North Carolinians tended to be non-slaveowning subsistence farmers. In mid-century, the state's rural and commercial areas were connected by the construction of a 129–mile (208 km) wooden plank road, known as a "farmer's railroad," from Fayetteville in the east to Bethania (northwest of Winston-Salem).[15] is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... North Carolina State Capitol The North Carolina State Capitol is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ... A sugarcane plantation at Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 2005 A plantation is a large tract of monoculture, as a tree plantation, a cotton plantation, a tea plantation or a tobacco plantation. ... The counties most commonly associated with Western North Carolina. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ... Bethania is a town located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ...


In addition to slaves, there were a number of free people of color in the state. Most were descended from free African Americans who had migrated along with neighbors from Virginia during the eighteenth century. After the Revolution, Quakers and Mennonites worked to persuade slaveholders to free their slaves. Enough were inspired by their efforts and the language of men's rights, and arranged for manumission of their slaves. The number of free people of color rose in the first couple of decades after the Revolution.[16] In the history of the slavery in the Americas, a free person of color was a person of full or partial African descent who was not enslaved. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The...


On October 25, 1836 construction began on the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad [17] to connect the port city of Wilmington with the state capital of Raleigh. In 1849 the North Carolina Railroad was created by act of the legislature to extend that railroad west to Greensboro, High Point, and Charlotte. During the Civil War the Wilmington-to-Raleigh stretch of the railroad would be vital to the Confederate war effort; supplies shipped into Wilmington would be moved by rail through Raleigh to the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. Chartered in 1835, the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad began operations in 1840 between Wilmington, NC and Weldon, NC. The name was changed in 1855 to the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Guilford County and the state of North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Guilford, Davidson, Randolph, Forsyth Government  - Mayor Rebecca Smothers (D) Area  - City 95. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


During the antebellum period North Carolina was an overwhelmingly rural state, even by Southern standards. In 1860 only one North Carolina town, the port city of Wilmington, had a population of more than 10,000. Raleigh, the state capital, had barely more than 5,000 residents. Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...


While slaveholding was less concentrated than in some Southern states, according to the 1860 census, more than 330,000 people, or 33% of the population of 992,622 were enslaved African Americans. They lived and worked chiefly on plantations in the eastern Tidewater. In addition, 30,463 free people of color lived in the state. They were also concentrated in the eastern coastal plain, especially at port cities such as Wilmington and New Bern where they had access to a variety of jobs. Free African Americans were allowed to vote until 1835, when the state rescinded their suffrage. In the United States: Tidewater is a name used to refer to an area in Virginia, in the region around Hampton Roads, Newport News, Norfolk, and Virginia Beach: see Tidewater region of Virginia. ... New Bern is a city located in Craven County, North Carolina where the Trent River and the Neuse River converge. ...


American Civil War

Main article: American Civil War

In 1860, North Carolina was a slave state, in which about one-third of the population of 992,622 were enslaved African Americans. This was a smaller proportion than many Southern states. In addition, the state had a substantial number of free people of color, just over 30,000.[18] The state did not vote to join the Confederacy until President Abraham Lincoln called on it to invade its sister-state, South Carolina. North Carolina was the site of few battles, but it provided at least 125,000 troops to the Confederacy— far more than any other state. Approximately 40,000 of those troops never returned home, dying of disease, battlefield wounds, and starvation. Elected in 1862, Governor Zebulon Baird Vance tried to maintain state autonomy against Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Richmond. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Zebulon Baird Vance (May 13, 1830--April 14, 1894) was an American Civil War hero and three-time Governor of North Carolina. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Even after secession, some North Carolinians refused to support the Confederacy. This was particularly true of non-slave-owning farmers in the state's mountains and western Piedmont region. Some of these farmers remained neutral during the war, while some covertly supported the Union cause during the conflict. Even so, Confederate troops from all parts of North Carolina served in virtually all the major battles of the Army of Northern Virginia, the Confederacy's most famous army. Four regiments from North Carolina served in the western theater in the Army of Tennessee. The largest battle fought in North Carolina was at Bentonville, which was a futile attempt by Confederate General Joseph Johnston to slow Union General William Tecumseh Sherman's advance through the Carolinas in the spring of 1865.[19] In April 1865 after losing the Battle of Morrisville, Johnston surrendered to Sherman at Bennett Place, in what is today Durham, North Carolina. This was the last major Confederate Army to surrender. North Carolina's port city of Wilmington was the last Confederate port to fall to the Union. It fell in the spring of 1865 after the nearby Second Battle of Fort Fisher. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... Media:Example. ... Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 - March 21, 1891) was a military officer in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, whose effectiveness was undercut by tensions with President Jefferson Davis. ... “General Sherman” redirects here. ... Popularly known as Bennett Place, the farmhouse owned by James and Nancy Bennett (alternately and probably correctly, Bennitt) was the site of the largest surrender of troops during the American Civil War on April 26, 1865. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... Second Battle of Fort Fisher Conflict American Civil War Date January 13-15, 1865 Place New Hanover County, North Carolina Result Union victory Sometimes referred to as the Gibraltar of the South and the last major stronghold of the Confederacy, Fort Fisher had tremendous strategic value during the American Civil...


The first Confederate soldier to be killed in the Civil War was Private Henry Wyatt, a North Carolinian. He was killed in the Battle of Big Bethel in June 1861. At the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, the 26th North Carolina Regiment participated in Pickett/Pettigrew's Charge and advanced the farthest into the Northern lines of any Confederate regiment. During the Battle of Chickamauga the 58th North Carolina Regiment advanced farther than any other regiment on Snodgrass Hill to push back the remaining Union forces from the battlefield. At Appomattox Court House in Virginia in April 1865, the 75th North Carolina Regiment, a cavalry unit, fired the last shots of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the Civil War. For many years, North Carolinians proudly boasted that they had been "First at Bethel, Farthest at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox."-1... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Map of Picketts Charge, July 3, 1863. ... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties and losses 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed, 14... McLean house, April 1865. ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ...


Demographics

See also: Demographics of the United States
Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 393,751
1800 478,103 21.4%
1810 556,526 16.4%
1820 638,829 14.8%
1830 737,987 15.5%
1840 753,419 2.1%
1850 869,039 15.3%
1860 992,622 14.2%
1870 1,071,361 7.9%
1880 1,399,750 30.7%
1890 1,617,949 15.6%
1900 1,893,810 17.1%
1910 2,206,287 16.5%
1920 2,559,123 16.0%
1930 3,170,276 23.9%
1940 3,571,623 12.7%
1950 4,061,929 13.7%
1960 4,556,155 12.2%
1970 5,082,059 11.5%
1980 5,881,766 15.7%
1990 6,628,637 12.7%
2000 8,049,313 21.4%
Est. 2007 9,061,032 12.6%

North Carolina has 3 Metropolitan Combined Statistical Areas with a population over 1 million: The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded four million Americans. ... The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... When the word metropolitan (from the Greek metera = mother and polis = town) is used as an adjective, as in metropolitan bishop, metropolitan France, or metropolitan area it can mean: of or characteristic of a metropolis; see also metropolitan area, Metropolitan Police, Metropolitan Railway of or belonging to the home territories... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Metropolitan Combined Statistical Area. ...

  • The Metrolina: Charlotte-Gastonia-Salisbury, NC-SC - population 2,191,604
  • The Triangle: Raleigh-Durham-Cary, NC- population of 1,565,223
  • The Piedmont Triad: Greensboro--Winston-Salem--High Point, NC - population of 1,513,576
North Carolina Population Density Map
North Carolina Population Density Map
Two thirds of North Carolina's population resides in the middle one third of its landmass. This implies that the middle one third of North Carolina is about four times more densely populated than the remaining two thirds.
Two thirds of North Carolina's population resides in the middle one third of its landmass. This implies that the middle one third of North Carolina is about four times more densely populated than the remaining two thirds.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2006, North Carolina has an estimated population of 8,856,505, which is an increase of 184,046, or 2.1%, from the prior year and an increase of 810,014, or 10.0%, since the year 2000.[20] This exceeds the rate of growth for the United States as a whole. The growth comprises a natural increase since the last census of 293,761 people (that is 749,959 births minus 456,198 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 527,991 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 180,986 people. Migration within the country produced a net increase of 347,005 people. Between 2005 and 2006, North Carolina passed New Jersey to become the 10th most populous state.[21] The state's population reported as under 5 years old was 6.7%, 24.4% were under 18, and 12.0% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51% of the population. The Charlotte metropolitan area, formally known as the Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill CMSA, is composed of seven counties in North Carolina and one county in South Carolina, though six other counties in North Carolina and two in South Carolina are also considered part of the region. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section can be improved by converting lengthy lists to text. ... The Piedmont Triad, Triad, or North Carolina Triad is a region of North Carolina in the Piedmont that consists of the area centered around the cities of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point, and Burlington. ... Image File history File links North_Carolina_population_map. ... Image File history File links North_Carolina_population_map. ... Image File history File links Piedmont_map. ... Image File history File links Piedmont_map. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Racial Makeup and Population Trends

Demographics of North Carolina (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 75.27% 22.20% 1.65% 1.70% 0.11%
2000 (Hispanic only) 4.28% 0.33% 0.10% 0.05% 0.03%
2005 (total population) 74.95% 22.29% 1.65% 2.06% 0.12%
2005 (Hispanic only) 5.89% 0.37% 0.12% 0.05% 0.03%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 7.41% 8.31% 7.51% 30.62% 17.92%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 4.93% 8.13% 6.31% 30.71% 16.84%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 48.62% 20.36% 25.79% 27.15% 21.63%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

In 2007, the U.S. Census estimated that the racial makeup of North Carolina was as follows: 70% White American, 22.3% African-American, 1.2% American Indian, and the remaining 6.5% are Hispanic or Latino (of any race). North Carolina has historically been a rural state, with most of the population living on farms or in small towns. However, over the last 30 years the state has undergone rapid urbanization, and today most of North Carolina's residents live in urban and suburban areas, as is the case in most of the United States. In particular, the cities of Charlotte and Raleigh have become major urban centers, with large, diverse, mainly affluent and rapidly growing populations. Most of this growth in diversity has been fueled by immigrants from Latin America, India, and Southeast Asia.[22] In addition, large numbers of people from the Northeastern United States and Florida have moved to the state in recent years, further swelling the population. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Look up urban in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Map of the US northeast. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


The center of population of North Carolina is located in Randolph County, in the town of Seagrove.[23] Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Randolph County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Seagrove is a town in Randolph County, North Carolina, United States. ...

Ancestry Group

Ancestry Percentage Main article:
African (21.6%) Of Total) See African American
American (13.9%) See British American
English (9.5%) See English American
German (9.5%) See German American
Irish (7.4%) See Irish American
Scots-Irish (3.2%) See Scots-Irish American
Italian (2.3%) See Italian American
Scottish (2.2%) See Scottish American
County Seat 2010 Projection[24]
Mecklenburg Charlotte 925,084
Wake Raleigh 900,072
Guilford Greensboro 474,605
Forsyth Winston-Salem 350,784
Cumberland Fayetteville 311,777
Durham Durham 262,256
Buncombe Asheville 234,697
Gaston Gastonia 205,489
Union Monroe 203,527
New Hanover Wilmington 200,401

A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... British Americans are citizens of the British or partial British ancestry. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ... This article is about the country. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Mecklenburg County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... For other places or people named Charlotte, see American metropolises, Charlotte, North Carolina is the countrys second biggest banking center. ... Wake County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Guilford County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Forsyth County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... Cumberland County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ... Durham County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Buncombe County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... Gaston County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Gastonia is a city in Gaston County in North Carolina, a state in the southeastern United States. ... Union County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Monroe is a city in Union County, North Carolina, United States. ... Location in the state of North Carolina Formed 1729 Seat Wilmington Area  - Total  - Water 849 km² (328 mi²) 334 km² (129 mi²) 39. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ...

African Americans

African Americans make up nearly a quarter of North Carolina's population. The number of middle-class blacks has increased since the 1970s. African Americans are concentrated in the state's eastern Coastal Plain and in parts of the Piedmont Plateau, where they had historically worked and where the most new job opportunities are. African-American communities number by the hundreds in rural counties in the south-central and northeast, and in predominantly black neighborhoods in the cities: Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, Fayetteville, Wilmington and Winston-Salem. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Free African Americans migrated to frontier areas of North Carolina from Virginia. Detailed family histories of 80% of those counted as "all other free persons" in the 1790-1810 federal census show they were descendants of African Americans free in Virginia during the colonial period. As boundaries were then more permeable, most free African families descended from unions between white women, free or servant, and African men, free, servant or slave. Indians who adopted English customs became part of free African American communities and married into the families. Some of the lighter-skinned descendants formed their own distinct communities, often identifying themselves as Indian or Portuguese to escape effects of the color line.[25]


Until the mid-1860s, North Carolina had more small farms and fewer plantations than adjacent South Carolina and Virginia. These "yeoman" farmers were non-slave-holding (or owning few slaves), private land owners of tracts of approximately 500 acres (2 km²) or less. Relatively few blacks live in the state's mountains and rural areas of the western Piedmont. In some mountain counties, the black population has historically numbered in the few dozens at most. Yeoman is an antiquated term for farmers, tradesmen and other members of the early English middle class. ...


European Americans

Settled first, the coastal region attracted primarily English immigrants of the early migrations, including indentured servants transported to the colonies and descendants of English who migrated from Virginia. In addition, there were waves of Protestant European immigration, including the peoples of the British isles, French Huguenots, [26] and Swiss-Germans who settled New Bern. A concentration of Welsh (usually included with others from the British Isles) settled east of present Fayetteville in the 18th century. For a long time the wealthier, educated planters of the coastal region dominated state government. This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... New Bern redirects here. ... The Welsh are, according to Hastings (1997), an ethnic group and nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ...


North Carolinians of Scots-Irish, Scottish and English ancestry are spread across the state. Historically Scots-Irish and Northern English settled mostly in the Piedmont and backcountry. They were the last and most numerous of the immigrant groups from the British Isles before the Revolution, and settled throughout the Appalachian South, where they could continue their own culture.[27] The Scots-Irish were fiercely independent and mostly yeoman farmers. Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


In the Winston-Salem area, there is a substantial population of ethnic German ancestry descended from the immigration of members of the Protestant Moravian Church from Czechoslovakia area during the mid-18th century. Winston-Salem is a city located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... The Moravian Seal, as rendered by North Carolina artist Marie Nifong. ...


During the early 20th century, a small group of Orthodox immigrants from Ukraine settled in Pender County.[28]


Native Americans

Estimated population figures for Native American in North Carolina as of 2004 is 110,198. To date, North Carolina recognizes eight Native American tribal nations within its state borders:[29] This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...

  • The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians were federally recognized in 1868 and received state recognition in 1889. The Eastern Cherokee live in eastern Swain County, as well as Graham and Jackson counties, and have roughly 13,400 enrolled members, most of whom live on a reservation properly called the Qualla Boundary. The Reservation is slightly more than 56,000 acres (230 km²), and is held in trust by the federal government specifically for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.
  • The Haliwa-Saponi Tribe of Native Americans received state recognition in 1965. The tribe comprises a little more than 3,800 enrolled members who reside in northeastern North Carolina's Halifax and Warren counties.
  • The almost 2,000 members of the Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe are located in the mid-Atlantic North Carolina counties of Bladen, and Columbus and received state recognition in 1971.
  • The Coharie Tribe of Native Americans are located in Sampson and Harnett counties, and have a population of 1,781 enrolled members. The Coharie received state recognition in 1911. North Carolina rescinded recognition in 1913 but reinstated it in 1971.
  • The Sappony received state recognition in 1911 and have 850 enrolled members.
  • The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation have a population of 800 members who reside in Orange and Alamance counties and received state recognition in 2002.
  • The Meherrin are a tribe of Iroquoian-descent located primarily in rural northeastern Hertford, Bertie, and Gates counties, with a population of 557 enrolled members.

Only five states (California, Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas) have a larger Native American population than North Carolina.[30] The total Native American and Alaska Native population in the United States is 2,824,751, or 0.95% of the total. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are a federally recognized Native American band in the United States of America. ... Swain County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Graham County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Jackson County is a county located in the southwest of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Qualla Boundary is essentially the reservation of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina. ... The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are a federally recognized Native American band in the United States of America. ... See Haliwa-saponi ... Halifax County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Waccamaw Siouan Indians are one of eight state recognized Native American tribal nations in North Carolina. ... Bladen County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Columbus County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... The Coharie are a Native American Tribe who descend from the Neusiok Indians on the Little Coharie River, in Sampson and Harnett County, North Carolina. ... Sampson County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Harnett County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... The Coharie are a Native American Tribe who descend from the Neusiok Indians on the Little Coharie River, in Sampson and Harnett County, North Carolina. ... The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation are the descendants of the Saponi and other Siouan-speaking Indians who occupied the Piedmont of North Carolina and Virginia. ... Orange County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Alamance County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Meherrin Tribe is one of eight state-recognized tribes of Native Americans in North Carolina and received formal state recognition in 1986. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Hertford County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Bertie is the name of a very sweet breed of dog, a boxedor. ... Gates County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...

    • While recognized by the state, the Lumbee tribe has not been fully recognized as an official tribe by the Federal government. There are numerous people in the state who identify themselves as Lumbee, mainly concentrated in the Southeastern portions of the state in Robeson, Scotland, Cumberland and nearby counties. However, researchers have classified Lumbees as a tri-racial isolate group whose ancestors migrated from Virginia as free African Americans. For instance, most of the families from the 1790 census counted as "all other free persons" have been documented as descendants of African Americans who were free in Virginia in the colonial period. [31]

The Lumbee are a Native American tribe recognized by the state of North Carolina. ...

Hispanics/Latinos

Since 1990 the state has seen a boom in the number of Hispanics/Latinos. Once chiefly employed as migrant labor, the increase in Hispanics since 1990 can be attributed in part to the ease of access to low-skilled jobs that are the first step on the economic ladder. As a result, growing numbers of Hispanic immigrants are settling in the state, mainly from Mexico, Central America, and the Dominican Republic. Hispanic neighborhoods are found in the cities, and there are sizable populations of Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans in North Carolina. In 2005, the Pew Hispanic Center estimated that 300,000 — roughly 65 percent of North Carolina’s Latino population — are illegal immigrants, based on the Census Bureau’s population estimates.[32] The population has grown from 77,726 in 1990 to 517,617 in 2005, an average increase of 13.5% per year.[32] Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... A Cuban-American is an immigrant to the United States from Cuba. ... The Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the USA and the world. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ...


Asian Americans

The state has one of the most rapidly growing Asian American, specifically Indian and Vietnamese, populations in the country; the populations nearly quintupled and tripled, respectively, between 1990 and 2002. Recent estimates suggest that the state's Asian American population has increased significantly since 2000. The Hmong population in North Carolina has grown by 12,000 since the 1980s.[33] An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Language(s) Hmong/Mong Religion(s) Shamanism, Buddhism, Christianity, others The terms Hmong (pronounced ) and Mong () both refer to an Asian ethnic group in the mountainous regions of southern China. ...


The earliest record of Asian immigration in North Carolina goes back to the mid 1800s when the first Chinese Americans were hired as agricultural workers. The famous Chinese-Malay American Siamese twins - Eng and Chang Bunker - settled in Wilkesboro, North Carolina in 1839. Japanese Americans, Filipino Americans, and Koreans arrived in the early and mid 20th century. A Chinese American is an American who is of ethnic Chinese descent. ... A painting of Chang and Eng Bunker, circa 1836 Chang Bunker and Eng Bunker (May 11, 1811 - January 17, 1874), born in Siam (now Thailand), to a Chinese father Ti-eye and Nok, the daughter of a Chinese immigrant and a native Cham mother, were the twin brothers whose condition... Wilkesboro is a town in Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States. ... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... In 1998, Benjamin J. Cayetano became the first Filipino American (and second Asian American after Governor George R. Ariyoshi) to be elected state Governor of the United States. ...


Religion

North Carolina, like other Southern states, has traditionally been overwhelmingly Protestant. By the late 19th century, the largest Protestant denomination was the Southern Baptists. However, the rapid influx of northerners and immigrants from Latin America is steadily increasing the number of Roman Catholics and Jews in the state, and the numerical dominance of the Baptist Church is beginning to decline. Historic Southern United States. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States cooperative ministry agency serving missionary Baptist churches around the world. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


This change is most evident in the urban areas of the state, where the population is more culturally diverse and the bulk of the recent growth has occurred. However, in many rural counties the Southern Baptists remain the dominant Christian church. The second-largest Protestant church in North Carolina are the Methodists, who are strong in the northern Piedmont, and especially in populous Guilford County. There are also substantial numbers of Quakers in Guilford County, and northeastern North Carolina. The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Guilford County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Guilford County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ...


The Presbyterians, historically Scots-Irish, have had a strong presence in Charlotte, the state's largest city, and in Scotland County. The current religious affiliations of the people of North Carolina are shown below:[34] Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... Scotland County is the name of several counties in the United States: Scotland County, Missouri Scotland County, North Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Presbyterianism is a family of Christian denominations within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... Episcopalian and Episcopal may refer to: Note: Episcopalian refers to a person only, as in he or she is an Episcopalian. ... Church of God is a name used by numerous, mostly unrelated bodies, most of which descend from either Pentecostal/Holiness or Adventist traditions. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[3]) Church is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished mainly by its observance of Saturday, the original seventh day of the Judeo-Christian week, as the Sabbath. ... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... In Christianity, the term non-denominational refers to those churches which have not formally aligned themselves with an established denomination, or remain otherwise officially autonomous. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Agnosticism is the philosophical and theological view that the existence of God, gods or deities is either unknown or inherently unknowable. ...

Economy

See also: Economy of the United States and Economic history of the United States

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the state's 2006 total gross state product was $375 billion.[35] Its 2005 per capita personal income was $31,029, 36th in the nation.[36] North Carolina's agricultural outputs include poultry and eggs, tobacco, hogs, milk, nursery stock, cattle, sweet potatoes, and soybeans. However, North Carolina has recently been affected by offshoring and industrial growth in countries like China; one in five manufacturing jobs in the state has been lost to overseas competition.[37] There has been a distinct difference in the economic growth of North Carolina's urban and rural areas. While large cities such as Charlotte, Raleigh, Cary, and others have experienced rapid population and economic growth over the last thirty years, many of the state's small towns have suffered from loss of jobs and population. Most of North Carolina's small towns historically developed around textile and furniture factories. As these factories closed and moved to low-wage markets in Asia and Latin America, the small towns that depended upon them have suffered. The economy of the United States has been the worlds largest national economy since the late 1890s;[1] its gross domestic product (GDP) was estimated as $13. ... The economic history of the United States has its roots in European settlements in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ... Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 225 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio Poultry is the category of domesticated birds kept for meat, eggs, and feathers. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ... A glass of cows milk. ... A nursery is a place where plants are propagated, usually for sale as a business, though some gardeners and farmers keep private nurseries. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Binomial name Ipomoea batatas Linnaeus, The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a crop plant whose large, starchy, sweet-tasting tuberous roots are an important root vegetable. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... Offshore may refer to oil and natural gas production at sea; see oil platform. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The first gold nugget found in the U.S. was found in Cabarrus County in 1799. The first gold dollar minted in the U.S. was minted at the Bechtler Mint in Rutherford County.


Agriculture and Manufacturing

Over the past century, North Carolina has grown to become a national leader in agriculture, financial services, and manufacturing. The state's industrial output—mainly textiles, chemicals, electrical equipment, paper and pulp/paper products—ranked eighth in the nation in the early 1990s. The textile industry, which was once a mainstay of the state's economy, has been steadily losing jobs to producers in Latin America and Asia for the past 25 years, though the state remains the largest textile employer in the United States.[38] Over the past few years, another important Carolina industry, furniture production, has also been hard hit by jobs moving to Asia (especially China). Tobacco, one of North Carolina's earliest sources of revenue, remains vital to the local economy, although concerns about whether the federal government will continue to support subsidies for tobacco farmers has led some growers to switch to other crops like wine or leave farming altogether.[39] North Carolina is the leading producer of tobacco in the country.[40] Agriculture in the western counties of North Carolina (particularly Buncombe and surrounding counties) is presently experiencing a revitalization coupled with a shift to niche marketing, fueled by the growing demand for organic and local products. For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... The chemical industry comprises the companies that produce industrial chemicals. ... A piece of electrical equipment is a machine, powered by electricity and usually consists of an enclosure, a variety of electrical components and often a power switch. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... International Paper Company Wood pulp is the most common material used to make paper. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ...


Finance, Technology and Research

Charlotte's growing skyline
Charlotte's growing skyline

Charlotte, North Carolina's largest city, continues to experience rapid growth, in large part due to the banking & finance industry. Charlotte is now the second largest banking center in the United States (after New York), and is home to Bank of America and Wachovia. The Charlotte metro area is also home to 5 other Fortune 500 companies. Image File history File links Charlotteskyline. ... Image File history File links Charlotteskyline. ... Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Bank of America (NYSE: BAC TYO: 8648) is the largest commercial bank in the United States in terms of deposits, and the largest company of its kind in the world. ... For Moravian settlements in North Carolina, see Wachovia, North Carolina. ... Counties most commonly associated with the Charlote Metro area are in dark red, counties often included are light red, and counties sometimes included are in orange. ...


BB&T (Branch Banking & Trust), one of America's largest banks, was founded in Wilson, NC in 1872. Today, BB&T is headquartered out of Winston-Salem, NC and still does some operations in Wilson. The BB&T Corporation (NYSE: BBT) is one of Americas largest banks, offering full-service commercial and retail banking services along with other financial services like insurance, investments, retail brokerage, mortgage, corporate finance, consumer finance, payment services, international banking, leasing, and trust. ...


The information and biotechnology industries have been steadily on the rise since the creation of the Research Triangle Park (RTP) in the 1950s. Located between Raleigh and Durham (mostly in Durham County), its proximity to local research universities has no doubt helped to fuel growth. Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information Technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Research Triangle Park (RTP) is the largest research park in the world. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ...


The North Carolina Research Campus underway in Kannapolis (approx. 30 miles (48 km) northeast of Charlotte) promises to enrich and bolster the Charlotte area in the same way that RTP changed the Raleigh-Durham region.[41] Encompassing 5,800,000 square feet (539,000 m²), the complex is a collaborative project involving Duke University, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and N.C. State University, along with private and corporate investors and developers. The facility incorporates corporate, academic, commercial and residential space, oriented toward research and development (R&D) and biotechnology. Similarly, in downtown Winston-Salem, the Piedmont Triad Research Park is undergoing an expansion. Approximately thirty miles to the east of Winston Salem's research park, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and North Carolina A&T State University have joined forces to create the Gateway University Research Park, a technology-based research entity which will focus its efforts on areas such as nanotechnology, biotechnology & biochemistry, environmental sciences, and genetics among other science-based disciplines. The North Carolina Research Campus is a mixed-use research facility located in downtown Kannapolis, North Carolina, approximately 20 miles northeast of downtown Charlotte. ... The Kannapolis logo contains a Colonial Williamsburg architectural style cupola. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC Charlotte, or for athletics purposes, Charlotte), is a public, coeducational, research intensive university located in Charlotte, North Carolina in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or, more often, R&D), according to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, refers to creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... Piedmont Triad Research Park (PTRP), located in downtown Winston Salem is a highly interactive, master-planned innovation community developed to support life science and information technology research and development. ... The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a public university in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA and is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina system. ... North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NC A&T) is a four-year university located in Greensboro, North Carolina. ...


Film and the Arts

Film studios are located in Shelby, Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte, Asheville, Wilmington, and Winston-Salem. Some of the best-known films and television shows filmed in the state include: All the Real Girls, Being There, Blue Velvet, Bull Durham, The Color Purple, Cabin Fever, Cape Fear Children of the Corn, The Crow, Dawson's Creek, Dirty Dancing, Evil Dead 2, The Fugitive, The Green Mile, Hannibal, The Last of the Mohicans, Nell, One Tree Hill, Patch Adams (film), Shallow Hal, Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, and 28 Days. The television show most associated with North Carolina is The Andy Griffith Show, which aired on CBS-TV from 1960 to 1968. The series is set in the fictional small town of Mayberry, North Carolina, and was based on the real-life town of Mount Airy, North Carolina, although it was filmed in California. Mount Airy is the hometown of actor Andy Griffith. The show is still popular in reruns and is frequently shown in syndication around the nation. North Carolina is also home to some of the Southeast's biggest film festivals, including the National Black Theatre Festival and the RiverRun International Film Festival in Winston-Salem, and the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham, North Carolina. Shelby is a city in Cleveland County, North Carolina, United States. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... All the Real Girls is a 2003 American drama film, written and directed by David Gordon Green. ... This article is about the 1979 movie. ... Blue Velvet is an influential 1986 neo-noir mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. ... Bull Durham is a 1988 American movie about love and baseball. ... This article is about the film. ... This article is about the American horror film. ... Cape Fear is a 1991 film, directed by Martin Scorsese. ... Children of the Corn is a short story by Stephen King. ... The Crow is a 1994 American film adaptation of the comic book of the same name by James OBarr (who himself makes a cameo in the film). ... For the city in British Columbia, see Dawson Creek, British Columbia. ... Dirty Dancing is a 1987 romance film credited as being one of the most watched films of all time, particularly among women. ... Evil Dead II (also known as Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn and Evil Dead II, the Sequel to the Ultimate Experience in Grueling Terror) is a sequel to the movie The Evil Dead by Sam Raimi and starring Bruce Campbell. ... For the TV series, see The Fugitive (TV series). ... This article is about the 1999 film adaptation. ... Hannibal (aka The Silence of the Lambs 2) is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... This article is about the 1992 film. ... Nell is a 1994 drama film starring Jodie Foster as a young woman raised by her mother in an isolated cabin who has to face other human beings for the first time. ... One Tree Hill is a teen television drama created by Mark Schwahn that premiered on September 23, 2003 on The WB Television Network. ... Patch Adams is a 1998 film directed by Tom Shadyac and based on the true life story of Hunter Patch Adams and the book Gesundheit: Good Health is a Laughing Matter by Adams and Maureen Mylander. ... Shallow Hal is a 2001 romantic comedy film starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black and Jason Alexander. ... 28 Days is a 2000 film starring Sandra Bullock. ... The Andy Griffith Show is an American television series that aired on CBS from October 3rd, 1960 to April 1st, 1968. ... radio and United States. ... Mayberry is the name of a fictional town in North Carolina which was the setting for the American television sitcoms The Andy Griffith Show and Mayberry R.F.D.. Mayberry, population 1,800, was a small rural town which is remembered as much for its slow-paced life as it... Mount Airy is a city in Surry County, North Carolina, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Not to be confused with Andy Griffiths. ... Rerun van Pelt is the name of Linus and Lucys younger brother in the comic strip Peanuts. ... In broadcasting, syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast radio shows and television shows to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... The National Black Theatre Festival (NBTF) was founded in 1989 by Larry Leon Hamlin in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... The RiverRun International Film Festival is an annual film festival held in North Carolina, USA. It is a non-profit organisation. ... Winston-Salem is a city located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is one of the United States premier documentary film festivals held over the course of four days each spring at the Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ...


The School of Filmmaking at the North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem is a unique arts conservatory that combines rigorous professional training with unparalleled facilities, equipment and resources. All Second, Third and Fourth Year productions are entered into film and video festivals worldwide, and several have won major awards, including the Student Academy Award, the Angelus Award and the Cine Eagle Award. The best Fourth Year productions are also screened on film in front of large industry audiences at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles in June each year. School of the Arts alumni have performed in or behind the scenes of Broadway shows, film, television and regional theatre, and are members of the world’s finest symphony orchestras and opera and dance companies. They have won or been nominated for all of the major awards in the entertainment industry, including Tony, Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and others. Some well-known alumni of the NCSA School of Drama are Jada Pinkett Smith, Mary-Louise Parker, Catherine Dent, and Tom Hulce. What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... An Emmy Award. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Tax Revenue

See also: Taxation in the United States and State tax levels

North Carolina personal income tax is slightly progressive, with four incremental brackets ranging from 6.0% to 8.25%. The base state sales tax is 4.25%.[42] Most taxable sales or purchases are subject to the state tax as well as the 2.5% local tax rate levied by all counties, for a combined 6.75%. Mecklenburg County has an additional 0.5% local tax for public transportation, bringing sales taxes there to a total 7.25%. The total local rate of tax in Dare County is 3.5%, producing a combined state and local rate there of 7.75%.[43] In addition, there is a 29.9¢ tax per gallon of gas, a 30¢ tax per pack of cigarettes, a 79¢ tax on wine, and a 48¢ tax on beer. There are also additional taxes levied against food and prepared foods, normally totaling 2% and 8% respectively. The property tax in North Carolina is locally assessed and collected by the counties. The three main elements of the property tax system in North Carolina are real property, motor vehicles and personal property (inventories and household personal property are exempt). Estimated at 10.5% of income, North Carolina’s state/local tax burden percentage ranks 23rd highest nationally (taxpayers pay an average of $3,526 per-capita), just below the national average of 10.6%.[44] North Carolina ranks 40th in the Tax Foundation's State Business Tax Climate Index with neighboring states ranked as follows: Tennessee (18th), Georgia (19th), South Carolina (26th) and Virginia (13th).[44] FairTax Flat tax Tax protester arguments Constitutional Statutory Conspiracy Taxation by country Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        Taxation in the United States is a complex system which may involve payment to at least four different levels of government and many... State tax levels indicate both the tax burden and the services a state can afford to provide residents. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        A progressive tax is a tax imposed so that the effective... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Petrol redirects here. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Personal property is a type of property. ... The Tax Foundation logo The Tax Foundation is a Washington-D.C.-based tax research organization founded in 1937. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... State nickname: Peach State / Empire of the South Other U.S. States Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Governor Sonny Perdue Official languages English Area 154,077 km² (24th)  - Land 150,132 km²  - Water 3,945 km² (2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Transportation

International/Major regional airports

List of airports in North Carolina (U.S. state), grouped by type and sorted by location. ... Charlotte Douglas International Airport (IATA: CLT, ICAO: KCLT, FAA LID: CLT) is a public, mid-size international airport located in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Asheville Regional Airport (IATA:AVL, ICAO:KAVL) is an airport by Interstate 40 and Interstate 26 in Fletcher, North Carolina, near Asheville, North Carolina. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... Fayetteville Regional Airport (IATA: FAY, ICAO: KFAY), also known as Grannis Field is a public airport located just a few miles south of Fayetteville, North Carolina. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ... Piedmont Triad International Airport (IATA: GSO, ICAO: KGSO, FAA LID: GSO) (commonly referred to as PTIA or just PTI) is an airport just west of Greensboro, serving Greensboro, High Point and Winston-Salem in North Carolina. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... Nickname: Location in Guilford County and the state of North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Guilford, Davidson, Randolph, Forsyth Government  - Mayor Rebecca Smothers (D) Area  - City 95. ... Pitt-Greenville Airport (IATA: PGV, ICAO: KPGV) is a public airport located just north of Greenville, North Carolina. ... For other places with the same name, see Greenville. ... Moore County Airport (IATA: SOP, ICAO: KSOP) is a public airport located 3 miles north of Southern Pines and 5 miles northeast of Pinehurst, in Moore County, North Carolina, USA. It is mainly used for general aviation, but commercial air service is currently offered by Delta Air Lines. ... Pinehurst is a village in Moore County, North Carolina, United States. ... Southern Pines is a town located in Moore County, North Carolina. ... Raleigh-Durham International Airport (IATA: RDU, ICAO: KRDU, FAA LID: RDU) is located nine miles (14. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Craven County Regional Airport (IATA: EWN, ICAO: KEWN), also known as Craven Regional Airport, is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southeast of the town of New Bern in Craven County, North Carolina, USA. Craven County Regional Airport serves four counties in Eastern North Carolina. ... New Bern redirects here. ... The Wilmington International Airport (IATA: ILM, ICAO: KILM), sometimes known as the New Hanover County International Airport is an airport located in northern Wilmington, North Carolina. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ...

Mass transit

LYNX light rail car in Charlotte
LYNX light rail car in Charlotte

Several cities are served by mass transit systems. The Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) operates historical trolleys, express shuttles and bus service serving Charlotte and its immediate suburbs. In 2007 it opened the LYNX light rail line connecting Charlotte with suburban Pineville. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... The Charlotte Area Transit System, commonly referred to as CATS, is the public transit system in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. It operates bus service around the Metrolina area and a historical trolley in Uptown Charlotte, and operates a light rail system, called LYNX which opened on November 24th, 2007. ... LYNX is the light rail transit service in Charlotte, North Carolina, United States that began service on November 24, 2007, comprising a 9. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Pineville is a town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina located between Charlotte and York County, South Carolina. ...


The Fayetteville Area System of Transit (FAST) serves the city with ten bus routes and two shuttle routes. Fayetteville Area System of Transit operates nine fixed bus routes and two fixed shuttle routes within the cities of Fayetteville and Spring Lake, North Carolina between the hours of 5:45 am - 7:30 pm. ...


Within Raleigh, the Capital Area Transit system operates 27 bus routes. The Triangle Transit Authority operates buses that serve the region and connect to municipal bus systems in Durham and Chapel Hill; efforts for the city of Raleigh to build a light rail from the downtown areas of Raleigh to the downtown area of Durham failed as TTA's projected ridership did not meet federal standards. The Durham Area Transit Authority (DATA) bus system runs within Durham. The Triangle Transit Authority operates buses that serve the region and connect to municipal bus systems in Raleigh and Chapel Hill, which has its own entirely fare-free bus service, Chapel Hill Transit. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Triangle Transit Authority bus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section can be improved by converting lengthy lists to text. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Government  - Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - City  19. ...


Greensboro is serviced by the Greensboro Transit Authority (GTA), which operates 14 bus routes. Additionally, the Higher Education Area Transit (HEAT) system provides service to students who attend the following institutions: Bennett College, Elon University School of Law, Greensboro College, Guilford College, Guilford Technical Community College, North Carolina A&T State University, and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The HEAT service provides transportation between campuses and various other destinations, including downtown Greensboro.


Winston-Salem Transit Authority (WSTA) operates 30 bus routes around the city of Winston-Salem; additionally, WSTA recently completed construction of a central downtown mult-modal transportation center with 16 covered bus bays adjacent to a large enclosed lobby/waiting area. There are future plans being discussed for a $52 million streetcar system connecting Piedmont Triad Research Park/Downtown with Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ...


Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART) is the Triad's 10-county regional organization with the goal of enhancing all forms of transportation through regional cooperation. PART Express Bus provides express shuttle service to each major Triad city from Piedmont Triad International Airport, while Connections Express connects the Triad to Duke and UNC Medical Centers. PART is also administering and developing several rail service studies that include both commuter and intercity rail.


Wilmington's Wave Transit operates six bus lines within the city as well as five shuttles to nearby areas and a downtown trolley.


Major highways

The North Carolina Highway System consists of a vast network of Interstate highways, U.S. routes, and state routes. North Carolina has the largest state maintained highway network in the United States [45]. Major highways include: The North Carolina Highway System consists of a vast network of Interstate highways, U.S. routes, and state routes. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... Current U.S. Highway shield Current U.S. Highway shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (typically called U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... A state highway in the United States is a numbered highway primarily administered by a state government. ...

Image File history File links I-26. ... Interstate 26 (abbreviated I-26) is an east-west main route of the Interstate Highway System in the Southeastern United States. ... Image File history File links I-40. ... Interstate 40 in North Carolina runs for 421 miles through the state of North Carolina from the Tennessee state line in the west to its eastern terminus in Wilmington. ... Image File history File links I-73. ... Interstate 73 (abbreviated I-73) is a main route of the Interstate Highway System, currently located entirely within the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Image File history File links I-74. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 74 Interstate 74 (abbreviated I-74) is an interstate highway in the Midwestern and southeastern United States. ... Image File history File links I-77. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 77 Interstate 77 (abbreviated I-77) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Image File history File links I-85. ... In North Carolina, Interstate 85 scales the state for 233 miles (337 kilometers) from the South Carolina border to the Virginia border. ... Image File history File links I-95. ... Interstate 95 is a major interstate highway, running along the East Coast of the United States from Florida to Maine. ... Image File history File links US_1. ... MAJOR JUNCTIONS JUNCTION MILEPOST Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS {{{browse}}} United States Highway 1 is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Image File history File links US_17. ... MAJOR JUNCTIONS JUNCTION POSTMILE {{{junction}}} Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS {{{browse}}} United States Highway 17 is a north-south United States highway. ... Image File history File links US_64. ... United States Highway 64 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,326 miles from eastern North Carolina to just southwest of the Four Corners in northeast Arizona. ... Image File history File links US_70. ... United States Highway 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... Image File history File links US_74. ... United States Highway 74 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 524 miles (843 km) from southeast North Carolina to Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Image File history File links US_52. ... United States Highway 52 is an unusual United States highway. ... Image File history File links US_421. ... U.S. Highway 421 is a spur of U.S. Highway 21. ... Image File history File links US_401. ... U.S. Highway 401 is a spur of U.S. Highway 1. ...

Politics and government

The governor, lieutenant governor, and eight elected executive department heads form the Council of State. Ten other executive department heads appointed by the governor form the North Carolina Cabinet. The state's current governor is Democrat Mike Easley. The North Carolina General Assembly, or Legislature, consists of two houses: a 50-member Senate and a 120-member House of Representatives. For the 2007–2008 session, the current President Pro Tempore of the Senate is Democrat Marc Basnight (the Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina is the President of the Senate); The House Speaker is Democrat Joe Hackney. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... The current North Carolina Cabinet (as of September 2004) consists of: Governor Mike Easley Lieutenant Governor Beverly Perdue Elected cabinet members: (Council of State) Secretary of State Elaine Marshall Attorney General Roy A. Cooper III Commissioner of Agriculture W. Britt Cobb, Jr. ... The current North Carolina Cabinet (as of April 2005) consists of: Secretary of Administration Gwynn T. Swinson Secretary of Commerce Jim Fain Secretary of Correction Theodis Beck Secretary of Crime Control & Public Safety Bryan E. Beatty Secretary of Cultural Resources Lisbeth C. Evans Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources William... The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Michael Francis (Mike) Easley (born March 23, 1950) is the current governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Members of the North Carolina General Assembly, 2007-2008 session were elected in November 2006. ... The President Pro Tempore (more commonly, Pro-Tem) of the North Carolina Senate is the highest-ranking (internally elected) officer of one house of the North Carolina General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Marc Basnight Marc Basnight (born May 13, 1947) is a Democratic member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing the states first Senate district, including constituents in Beaufort, Camden, Currituck, Dare, Hyde, Pasquotank, Tyrrell, and Washington counties. ... The Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina is the second highest elected official in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The Speaker of the North Carolina House of Representatives is the presiding officer of one of the houses of the North Carolina General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Rep. ...


The Supreme Court of North Carolina is the state's highest appellate court; it numbers seven justices. The North Carolina Court of Appeals is the only intermediate appellate court in the state; it consists of fifteen judges who rule in rotating panels of three. Together, the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals constitute the appellate division of the court system. The trial division includes the Superior Court and the District Court. All felony criminal cases, civil cases involving more than $10,000 and misdemeanor and infraction appeals from District Court are tried in Superior Court. A jury of 12 hears the criminal cases. Civil cases—such as divorce, custody, child support, and cases involving less than $10,000—are heard in District Court, along with criminal cases involving misdemeanors and lesser infractions. The trial of a criminal case in District Court is always without a jury. The District Court also hears juvenile cases involving children under the age of 16 who are delinquent and children under the age of 18 who are undisciplined, dependent, neglected, or abused. Magistrates accept guilty pleas for minor misdemeanors, accept guilty pleas for traffic violations, and accept waivers of trial for worthless-check cases among other things. In civil cases, the magistrate is authorized to try small claims involving up to $4,000 including landlord eviction cases. Magistrates also perform civil marriages. The Supreme Court of North Carolina is the states highest appellate court. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... The North Carolina Court of Appeals is the only intermediate appellate court in the state of North Carolina. ... For the record label, see Felony Records The term felony is a term used in common law systems for very serious crimes, whereas misdemeanors are considered to be less serious offenses. ... An empty jury box in an American courtroom For jury meaning makeshift, see jury rig. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... Child custody and guardianship are legal terms which are sometimes used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and his or her child, such as the right of the parent to make decisions for the child, and the parents duty to care for the child. ... In many countries, child support or child maintenance is the ongoing obligation for a periodic payment made by a non-custodial parent to a custodial parent, caregiver or guardian, for the care and support of children of a relationship or marriage that has been terminated. ... A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ... Example of a Canadian cheque. ...


State constitution

The state constitution governs the structure and function of the North Carolina government. It is the highest legal document for the state and subjugates North Carolina law. Like all state constitutions in the United States, this constitution is subject to federal judicial review. Any provision of the state constitution can be nullified if it conflicts with federal law and the United States Constitution. The North Carolina Constitution governs the structure and function of the North Carolina state government. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review the actions of public sector bodies in terms of their legality or constitutionality. ... Federal law is the body of law created by the federal government of a nation. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


North Carolina has had three constitutions:

  • 1776: Ratified December 18, 1776, as the first constitution of the independent state. The Declaration of Rights was ratified the preceding day.
  • 1868: Framed in accordance with the Reconstruction Acts after North Carolina was readmitted into the Union. It was a major reorganization and modification of the original into fourteen articles. It also introduced townships which each county was required to create, the only southern state to do so.
  • 1971: Minor consolidation of the 1868 constitution and subsequent amendments.

is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... A township in the United States refers to a small geographic area, ranging in size from 6 to 54 square miles (15. ...

Federal apportionments

North Carolina currently has 13 congressional districts, which, when combined with its two U.S. Senate seats, gives the state 15 electoral votes. In the 109th Congress, the state was represented by seven Democratic and six Republican members of congress, plus two Republican Senators. The Democrats picked up one seat (District 11) in the 2006 election for the 110th Congress. These are tables of congressional delegations from North Carolina to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The 11th Congressional District sends one representative from North Carolina to the House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ...


Politics

See also: Politics of the United States
See also: Disfranchisement after the Civil War
See also: Voting rights in the United States

North Carolina is politically dominated by the Democratic and Republican political parties. Since the 19th century, third parties, such as the Green Party and Libertarian Party, have had difficulty making inroads in state politics. They have both run candidates for office with neither party's winning a state office. The Libertarian Party is engaged in a lawsuit with the state over ballot access.[46] Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... The Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution, adopted in 1870 in response to the American Civil War, prevented any state from denying the right to vote to any citizen on account of his race. ... The issue of voting rights in the United States has been contentious over the countrys history. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... For other uses, see Third party. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ...


Historically, North Carolina was politically divided between the eastern and western parts of the state. Before the Civil War, the eastern half of North Carolina supported the Democratic Party, primarily because the region contained most of the state's planter slaveholders who profited from large cash crops. Yeomen farmers in the western Piedmont and mountains were not slaveholders and tended to support the Whig party, seen as more moderate on slavery and more supportive of business interests. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ...


Following the Civil War, Republicans, including newly enfranchised freedmen, controlled the state government during Reconstruction. When federal troops were removed in the national compromise of 1877, the Democratic Party gained control of the state government, partly through white paramilitary groups conducting a campaign of violence against blacks to discourage them from voting, especially in the Piedmont counties. Despite that, the number of black officeholders peaked in the 1880s as they were elected to local offices in black-majority districts.[47]


Following a downturn in food prices, in 1892 many of the nation's farmers created the Populist Party to represent their interests. The party was strengthened by the Panic of 1893 and subsequent nationwide economic depression. In North Carolina, the Republican and Populist parties formed an interracial alliance, called an electoral fusion, in 1894 which resulted in control of the state legislature. In 1896 the Republican-Populist alliance took control of the governorship and many state offices. In response, many white Democrats began efforts to reduce voter rolls and turnout.[48] During the late 1890s, white Democrats began to pass legislation to restrict voter registration and reduce voting by blacks and poor whites. The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a relatively short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... The Panic of 1893 was a serious decline in the economy of the United States that began in 1893 and was precipitated in part by a run on the gold supply. ... The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in late 19th century in the United States. ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ...


With the first step accomplished in 1896 by making registration more complicated and reducing black voter turnout, in 1898 the state's Democratic Party regained control of the state government. Contemporary observers described the election as a "contest unquestionably accompanied by violence, intimidation and fraud - to what extent we do not know - in the securing of a majority of 60,000 for the new arrangement".[49] Using the slogan, "White Supremacy", and backed by influential newspapers such as the Raleigh News and Observer under publisher Josephus Daniels, the Democrats ousted the Populist-Republican majority. White supremacy is a racist ideology which holds the belief that white people are superior to other races. ... The News & Observer logo The front page of The News & Observer from January 26, 2005 The News & Observer is the regional daily newspaper of the Research Triangle area of North Carolina. ... Josephus Daniels Josephus Daniels (18 May 1862–15 January 1948) was an American politician and newspaper publisher from North Carolina, who served as Secretary of the Navy during World War I. A native of Washington, North Carolina, Daniels owned and managed several newspapers before purchasing the Raleigh News and Observer...


Encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that upheld the Mississippi disfranchising constitution in Williams v. Mississippi (1898), North Carolina legislators passed similar provisions in 1900, as did eight other states. Provisions included imposition of poll taxes, residency requirements, and literacy tests. Initially the grandfather clause was used to exempt illiterate whites from the literacy test, but many were gradually disfranchised as well. By these efforts, by 1904 white Democratic legislators had completely eliminated black voter turnout in North Carolina.[50] Although African Americans mounted litigation and the U.S. Supreme Court began to find specific provisions unconstitutional (as in Guinn v. United States (1915) which struck down the grandfather clause), state legislatures responded with new mechanisms for restricting voter registration. Disfranchisement lasted until the mid-1960s. For specific national Supreme Courts, see Category:National supreme courts. ... Disfranchisement or disenfranchisement is the revocation of, or failure to grant, the right of suffrage (the right to vote) to a person or group of people. ... Williams v. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... A Voting test is a test designed to determine ones ability to read and write a given language. ... A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ... Holding A state statute drafted in such a way as to serve no rational purpose other than to disadvantage the right of African-American citizens to vote violated the 15th Amendment. ...


With some notable exceptions, North Carolina then became a part of the "Solid Democratic South". The Solid South was based on disfranchisement of most African Americans and tens of thousands of poor whites. Southern states managed to keep Congressional apportionment based on total population, despite having deprived about half the citizens of the power to vote. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


However, some counties in North Carolina's western Piedmont and Appalachian Mountains continued to vote Republican, continuing a tradition that dated from their yeoman culture and opposition to secession before the Civil War. In 1952, aided by the presidential candidacy of popular war hero Dwight Eisenhower, the Republicans were successful in electing a U.S. Congressman, Charles R. Jonas. For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... Charles Raper Jonas (1904 - 1988) was a U.S. representative from North Carolina for ten terms (1953-1973). ...


In the mid-20th century Republicans began to attract white voters in North Carolina and other Southern states. This was after passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 under Democratic President Lyndon Johnson, which extended Federal protection and enforcement of civil rights for all American citizens. Because the Democratic Party had supported civil rights at the national level, most black voters (just under 25% of North Carolina's population in the 1960 census) initially aligned with the Democrats when they regained their franchise.[51] In 1972, aided by the landslide re-election of Richard Nixon, Republicans in North Carolina elected their first governor and U.S. senator of the twentieth century. Nixon redirects here. ...


Senator Jesse Helms played a major role in renewing the Republican Party and turning North Carolina into a two-party state. Under his banner, many conservative white Democrats in the central and eastern parts of North Carolina began to vote Republican, at least in national elections. In part, this was due to dissatisfaction with the national Democratic Party's stance on issues of civil rights and racial integration. In later decades, conservatives rallied to Republicans over social issues such as prayer in school, gun rights, abortion rights, and gay rights.[citation needed] Jesse Alexander Helms, Jr. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation... Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and regulation of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through legal and criminal use. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The LGBT rights movement in the United States seeks to achieve equality for all Americans, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity (heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual...


Except for regional son Jimmy Carter's election in 1976, from 1968–2004 North Carolina has voted Republican in every presidential election. At the state level, however, the Democrats still control most of the elected offices. State and local elections have become highly competitive compared to the previous one-party decades of the 20th century. For example, eastern North Carolina routinely elects numerous Republican sheriffs and county commissioners, a shift that did not happen until the 1980s. The Republicans hold both U.S. Senate seats, but the Democrats retain the governorship, majorities in both houses of the state legislature, state supreme court, and a 7-6 majority of U.S. House seats, as of January 2007. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ...


Modern North Carolina politics center less around the old east-west geographical split, and more on a growing urban-suburban-rural divide. Many of the state's rural and small-town areas are now heavily Republican, while growing urban centers such as Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham and Greensboro are increasingly Democratic. The suburban areas around the cities usually hold the power, and vote both ways. Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Greensboro is the name of some places in the United States of America: Greensboro, Alabama Greensboro, Florida Greensboro, Georgia Greensboro, Maryland Greensboro, North Carolina Greensboro, Pennsylvania Greensboro, Vermont This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Two Presidents of the United States were born and raised in North Carolina, but both men began their political careers in neighboring Tennessee, and were elected President from that state. The two men were James K. Polk and Andrew Johnson. A third U.S. President, Andrew Jackson, may also have been born in North Carolina. However, as he was born almost precisely on the state line with South Carolina, both states claim him as a native son, and historians have debated for decades over the precise site of Jackson's birthplace. On the grounds of the old state capitol building in Raleigh is a statue dedicated to the Presidents who were born in the state; Jackson is included in the statue. Jackson himself stated that he was born in what later became South Carolina, but at the time of his birth, the line between the states had not been surveyed. For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...


North Carolina remains a control state. This is probably due to the state's strongly conservative Protestant heritage. Four of the state's counties - Clay, Graham, Mitchell, and Yancey, which are all located in rural areas - remain "dry" (the sale of alcoholic beverages is illegal).[4] However, the remaining 96 North Carolina counties allow the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, as is the case in most of the United States. Even in rural areas, the opposition to selling and drinking alcoholic beverages is declining, as the decreasing number of "dry" counties indicates. Map of Alcoholic Beverage Control States, current as of February 2006. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... This article is about counties in the U.S. that prohibit alcoholic beverage sales. ...


North Carolina is one of the 12 states to decriminalize marijuana. In 1997 Marijuana and Tetrahydrocannabinols were moved from a schedule I to schedule IV . Transfer of less than 5 grams is not considered sale, and up to 1 1/2 ounces is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine or community service, at the judge's discretion, rather than imprisonment or a felony charge. [52]


In 2005, following substantial political maneuvering, the state legislature voted to implement a state lottery, thus altering North Carolina's reputation as the "anti-lottery" state, where owning a lottery ticket from another state was once a felony. By 2005, every state surrounding North Carolina had a lottery in operation. The North Carolina Education Lottery began selling tickets on March 31, 2006. The lottery has had unexpectedly low sales since its inception.[53] The North Carolina Education Lottery was enacted when Governor Mike Easley signed the North Carolina State Lottery Act (H. 1023) and the 2005 Appropriations Act (S. 622) on 31 August 2005. ... A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ... The North Carolina Education Lottery was enacted when Governor Mike Easley signed the North Carolina State Lottery Act (H. 1023) and the 2005 Appropriations Act (S. 622) on 31 August 2005. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Education

Elementary and secondary education

Elementary and secondary public schools are overseen by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, which is headed by the North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction, who is also secretary of the North Carolina State Board of Education. This body holds most of the legal authority for making public education policy. [54] North Carolina has 115 public school systems,[55] each of which is overseen by a local school board. A county may have one or more systems within it. The largest school systems in North Carolina are the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Wake County Public School System, Guilford County Schools, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, and Cumberland County Schools. In total there are 2,338 public schools in the state, including 93 charter schools.[55] The North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction is the elected head of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and oversees the public school systems of the state. ... The North Carolina State Board of Education, established by Article 9 of the North Carolina Constitution, supervises and administers the public school systems of the North Carolina. ... Location Charlotte, North Carolina Superintendent Dr. Peter C. Gorman Total Enrollment 129,011 (2006-07) Budget $1. ... The Wake County Public School System is a public school district located in Wake County, North Carolina. ... Guilford County Schools is the 3rd largest School District in North Carolina. ... Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools (WSFCS) is a school district in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... Cumberland County Schools (CCS) is a school district encompassing the entirety of Cumberland County, North Carolina, United States. ... In the United States, a charter school is a school that is created via a legal charter. ...

See also: List of school districts in North Carolina

The following is a list, broken down by geographical region, of the 115 local education agencies (LEA) in North Carolina. ...

Colleges and universities

For more details on this topic, see List of colleges and universities in North Carolina

In 1795, North Carolina opened the first public university in the United States - the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More than 200 years later, the University of North Carolina system encompasses 16 public universities including the three largest North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and East Carolina University. The system also supports several well-known historically black colleges and universities such as North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina Central University, and Winston-Salem State University. Along with its public universities, North Carolina has 58 public community colleges in its community college system. See North Carolina state entry. ... The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... East Carolina University is a public, coeducational, intensive research university located in Greenville, North Carolina, United States. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NC A&T) is a four-year university located in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... North Carolina Central University (NCCU) is a historically black college located in Durham, North Carolina. ... Winston-Salem State University is a four-year is a public, coeducational, research university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... A community college is a type of educational institution. ... The North Carolina Community College System is a statewide network of fifty-eight (58) public community colleges and one technology center. Each college has a distinct governance system and policies. ...


North Carolina's private universities and colleges include Campbell University, Davidson College, Duke University, Elon University, Gardner-Webb University, and Wake Forest University. A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Campbell University is a university in Buies Creek, North Carolina, US. Campbell is a coeducational, church-related (Baptist) university, and has an approximately equal number of male and female students. ... Davidson College is a private liberal arts college for 1,700 students in Davidson, North Carolina, USA. Both the town and college were named for Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, a Revolutionary War commander. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... Elon University is a private, liberal arts university located in Elon, North Carolina. ... Gardner-Webb University is a four-year private university 50 miles west of Charlotte in Boiling Springs, North Carolina and is affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ...


Sports and recreation

Despite having over eight million people, the disbursement of North Carolinas population over three major metropolitan areas has precluded attracting any major professional sports league teams until recently. ...

Professional sports

Time Warner Cable Arena, home to the Charlotte Bobcats of the NBA.
Time Warner Cable Arena, home to the Charlotte Bobcats of the NBA.

Despite having over nine million people, North Carolina's population being spread out over three major metropolitan areas precluded attracting any major professional sports league teams until 1974, when the New York Stars of the World Football League was relocated to Charlotte in the middle of the season and renamed the Charlotte Stars (the team would be renamed the Charlotte Hornets in 1975 and would play until the WFL folded later that year). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 674 KB) Photo taken November 23, 2005 by user Geologik. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 674 KB) Photo taken November 23, 2005 by user Geologik. ... The Charlotte Bobcats are a professional basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Charlotte Hornets was a football team in the 1974-75 World Football League. ... WFL logo The World Football League was an American football league that played in 1974 and part of 1975. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first successful franchise from a major professional sports league to be created in North Carolina were the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), which began play in the 1987-88 season. The state remains without a Major League Baseball franchise despite numerous efforts to attract a team (including the 2006 push to relocate the Florida Marlins to Charlotte). Charlotte Hornets may refer to several sports teams based in Charlotte, North Carolina: The NBAs New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets, formerly based in Charlotte (1988-2002). ... NBA redirects here. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ...


On June 19, 2006, the Carolina Hurricanes, a National Hockey League (NHL) franchise based in Raleigh, won the Stanley Cup. The Hurricanes, who call the RBC Center home, are the first professional sports team from North Carolina to win their sport's highest championship. The National Football League (NFL) is represented by the Carolina Panthers, who began play in 1995, and call Charlotte's Bank of America Stadium home. In 2004, the NBA returned to the state with the Charlotte Bobcats who play their home games in Time Warner Cable Arena. The Carolina RailHawks are a men's professional soccer team in the United Soccer Leagues, and their home field is the WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary. The American Indoor Football Association (AIFA) is represented by the Fayetteville Guard who plays at Crown Coliseum. North Carolina was home to the Charlotte Rage and the Carolina Cobras of the Arena Football League. is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Carolina Hurricanes are a professional ice hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The RBC Center (originally the Raleigh Entertainment and Sports Arena) is an indoor arena located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... NFL redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Panther Blue, Silver, White Mascot Sir Purr Personnel Owner Jerry Richardson General Manager Marty Hurney Head Coach John Fox Team history Carolina Panthers (1995... Bank of America Stadium is a football stadium located in uptown Charlotte, North Carolina. ... The Charlotte Bobcats are a professional basketball team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Carolina RailHawks Football Club is a professional soccer team located in Cary, North Carolina playing in the USL First Division in the United States. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Indoor Football Association(AIFA) was formed in October of 2006. ... The Fayetteville Guard is a professional indoor football team. ... Cumberland County Crown Coliseum is a 8,920-seat multi-purpose arena in Fayetteville, North Carolina. ... The Charlotte Rage was a team in the Arena Football League, a league which plays a scaled-down version of American football suitable for play in venues primarily designed for ice hockey or basketball. ... Year founded 2000 Year folded 2004 Prior names none ArenaBowl championships none // History The Carolina Cobras were a franchise in the Arena Football League. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ...


The state is also a center of American motorsports, with more than 80% of NASCAR racing teams and related industries located in the Piedmont region. The largest race track in North Carolina is Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord where the Sprint Cup Series holds three major races each year. The NASCAR Hall of Fame, located in Charlotte, is due to open in 2010. Many of NASCAR's most famous driver dynasties, the Pettys, Earnhardts, Allisons, Jarretts and Waltrips all live within an hour of Charlotte. Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Lowes Motor Speedway (formerly Charlotte Motor Speedway) is a speedway in Concord, North Carolina, north of Charlotte. ... Concord is a city located in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, a suburb of Charlotte. ... NASCAR has committed itself to building a Hall of Fame at some location in the southern or midwestern United States. ...


In off-road motocycle racing, the Grand National Cross Country series makes two stops in North Carolina, Morganton and Yadkinville; the only other state to host two GNCC events is Ohio. For sport amateurs, the state holds the State Games of North Carolina each year. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Off-roading. ... GNCC Racing GNCC Racing was founded in the early 1980s. ... Morganton is a city in Burke County, North Carolina, United States. ... Yadkinville is a town in Yadkin County, North Carolina, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The State Games of North Carolina is an Olympic-style competition for residents of North Carolina, and a member of the State Games of America. ...


From the 1930s to the early 1990s, the Mid Atlantic Championship Wrestling professional wrestling promotion, under the Crockett family, operated almost entirely out of Charlotte. Mid Atlantic was a long-time member of the National Wrestling Alliance and many of their top stars appeared on national television on NWA and later WCW events. Many retired or still-current wrestlers live in the Charlotte/Lake Norman area, including Ric Flair, Ricky Steamboat, Matt and Jeff Hardy, Stan Lane, and Shannon Moore. The National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) is the largest governing body for a group of independent professional wrestling promotions and sanctions various NWA championships. ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Hardy Boyz (also known as the The Hardys and Team Xtreme) are a professional wrestling tag team in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) that consists of real life brothers Matt and Jeff Hardy. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shannon Brian Moore (born July 27, 1979) is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on the SmackDown! brand. ...


North Carolina has become a hot bed for professional bull riding (PBR). It is the home of the 1995 PRCA World Champion Bull Rider Jerome Davis. It is also home to several professional stock contractors and bull owners including Thomas Teague of Teague Bucking Bulls. The Southern Extreme Bull Riding Association SEBRA headquarters are located in Archdale. Bull Riding in Del Rio, Texas Bull riding is a rodeo sport that involves a rider getting on a large male bovine, and attempting to stay mounted for at least 8 seconds. ... Professional Bull Riders, Inc. ... The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) is a rodeo organization who members compete in rodeos around the United States. ... The Southern Extreme Bull Riding Association was established in 1994 in Archdale , North Carolina . ... Archdale is a city located in Randolph County, North Carolina. ...


North Carolina is a state known for minor league sports, notably the setting of the 1987 comedy Bull Durham about the Durham Bulls of the Carolina League. The state boasts over 30 minor league baseball teams in six different minor leagues, including the Triple-A International League teams in Charlotte and Durham. There is a number of indoor football, indoor soccer, minor league basketball, and minor league ice hockey teams throughout the state. North Carolina has become a top golf destination for players across the nation, notably in Pinehurst, and the community of Southern Pines of Moore County which is home to over 50 golf courses. Bull Durham is a 1988 American movie about love and baseball. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Carolina League is a minor league baseball affiliation which operates in the South Atlantic region of the United States. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... Minor leagues in the sense intended in this article are professional sports leagues which are not regarded as the premier leagues in those sports. ... This article is about the game. ... Photo of the Carolina Hotel, the largest and primary hotel on the Pinehurst Resort grounds. ... Southern Pines is a town located in Moore County, North Carolina. ... Moore County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ...


College Sports

Although North Carolina did not have a major-league professional sports franchise until the 1980's, the state has long been known as a hotbed of college basketball. Since the formation of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) in 1953, the conference's North Carolina member schools have excelled in conference play. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), Duke University, and North Carolina State University are all located with 25 miles of one another, creating fierce rivalries. Wake Forest University, another ACC member, is located less than 100 miles to the west of these schools in Winston-Salem. UNC has won four NCAA national championships in basketball, Duke has won three NCAA championships, and NC State has won two. The Duke-UNC basketball rivalry has been called one of the best rivalries in college sports, and the two schools are often contenders for the national title. In addition to the ACC schools, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte went to the NCAA's Final Four in 1977, and Davidson College near Charlotte went to the NCAA's "Elite Eight" in 1968, 1969, and 2008. In 2007 Barton College in Wilson won the NCAA Division II championship in men's basketball. Although basketball remains the dominant college sport in North Carolina, several schools have also enjoyed success in football and other sports. In 2005, 2006, and 2007 Appalachian State University won the NCAA Division I-AA national championship in football; they are the first university to win the I-AA national championship three times in a row. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Winston-Salem is a city located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNC Charlotte, or for athletics purposes, Charlotte), is a public, coeducational, research intensive university located in Charlotte, North Carolina in the United States. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... Davidson College is a private liberal arts college for 1,700 students in Davidson, North Carolina, USA. Both the town and college were named for Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, a Revolutionary War commander. ... Barton College is a private liberal arts college located in Wilson, North Carolina. ... Appalachian State University is a public university located in Boone, North Carolina and the sixth largest institution in the University of North Carolina system. ...


Recreation

The Blue Ridge Mountains of the Shining Rock Wilderness Area
The Blue Ridge Mountains of the Shining Rock Wilderness Area

Due to geography, rich history, and growing industry, North Carolina provides a large range of recreational activities from swimming at the beach[56] to skiing in the mountains. North Carolina offers fall colors, freshwater and saltwater fishing, hunting, birdwatching, agritourism, ATV trails, ballooning, rock climbing, biking, hiking, skiing, boating and sailing, camping, canoeing, caving (spelunking), gardens, and arboretums. North Carolina has theme parks, aquariums, zoos, museums, historic sites, lighthouses, elegant theaters, concert halls, and fine dining.[57] Image File history File linksMetadata Blue_Ridge_NC.jpg Shining Rock wilderness area Source: Jan van der Crabben (Photographer) File links The following pages link to this file: Blue Ridge Mountains Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Blue_Ridge_NC.jpg Shining Rock wilderness area Source: Jan van der Crabben (Photographer) File links The following pages link to this file: Blue Ridge Mountains Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Beach (disambiguation). ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... Maple leaves Autumn leaf color is a phenomenon that affects the normally green leaves of many deciduous trees and shrubs by which they take on, during a few weeks in the autumn months, one or many colors that range from red to yellow. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Birdwatching or birding is the observation and study of birds. ... A lodging cottage in a rural area of Lithuania. ... The ATV is commonly called a quad (quad-bike) in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. ... Balloons are often used or given on special occasions, like cards or flowers. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage. ... Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... Caving frequently involves a lot of mud. ... For other uses, see Garden (disambiguation). ... This article is about a type of botanical garden. ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... “Aquaria” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Zoo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... A historic site is a location where pieces of history have been preserved. ... Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wavewashed lighthouses For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... Fine dining is often used to describe a restaurant that creates a dining experience. ...


North Carolinians enjoy outdoor recreation utilizing numerous local bike paths, 34 state parks, and 14 national parks, including: North Carolina State Parks: Carolina Beach State Park Cliffs of the Neuse State Park Crowders Mountain State Park Eno River State Park Falls Lake State Recreation Area Fort Fisher State Recreation Area Fort Macon State Park Goose Creek State Park Gorges State Park Hammocks Beach State Park Hanging Rock State... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a 2,174 mile (3500 km) marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, running from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt. ... Blue Ridge Parkway route map The Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Parkway and All-American Road in the United States, noted for its scenic beauty. ... Cape Hatteras National Seashore is a United States national park in North Carolina. ... Cape Lookout National Seashore preserves a 56 mile (90 km) long section of the Southern Outer Banks, or Crystal Coast, of North Carolina, USA, running from Ocracoke Inlet on the northeast to Beaufort Inlet on the southeast. ... The Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, located in Flat Rock, North Carolina near Henderson, preserves Connemara Farms, the home of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and writer Carl Sandburg (1878-1967). ... Flat Rock is a village located in Henderson County, North Carolina. ... The Croatan National Forest is a U.S. National Forest located on the Atlantic coast of North Carolina. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Inner Banks. ... Fort Raleigh National Historic Site preserves the location of the first English settlement in North America. ... Manteo is a town in Dare County, North Carolina, United States. ... Cades Cove panorama The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. ... Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, at 2331 New Garden Road in Greensboro, North Carolina, commemorates the Battle of Guilford Court House, fought on March 15, 1781. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Moores Creek National Battlefield is a U.S. National Battlefield park managed by the National Park Service. ... The Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail (OVHT) is part of the U.S. National Trails System. ... Old Salem is a living history museum that operates within the restored Moravian community of Salem. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... The Trail of Tears refers to the forced removal of the Cherokee American Indian tribe by the U.S. federal government, which resulted in the deaths of thousands of Cherokee Indians. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Kill Devil Hills is a town in Dare County, North Carolina, USA. The population was 5,897 at the 2000 census. ... The Uwharrie Mountains are an ancient coastal mountain range located in present day North Carolina. ...

Other information

Famous food and drinks from North Carolina

A nationally-famous cuisine from North Carolina is pork barbecue. However, there are strong regional differences and rivalries over the sauces and method of preparation used in making the barbecue. Eastern North Carolina pork barbecue uses a vinegar-based sauce and the "whole hog" is cooked, thus using both white and dark meat. The "capital" of eastern Carolina barbecue is usually considered to be the town of Wilson, near Raleigh. Western North Carolina pork barbecue uses a ketchup-based sauce and only the pork shoulder (dark meat) is used. The "capital" of western Carolina barbecue is usually considered to be the town of Lexington, south of Winston-Salem. A third type of pork barbecue, using a sauce which is a combination of ketchup and vinegar, is "Shelby" barbecue which is made in the town of Shelby. Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Wilson is a city in Wilson County, North Carolina, it is located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Lexington is the county seat of Davidson County, North Carolina, United States. ... Shelby is a city in Cleveland County, North Carolina, United States. ...


North Carolina is the birthplace of Pepsi-Cola, first produced in 1890 in New Bern. Regional soft drinks created and still based in the state are Sundrop and Cheerwine. Krispy Kreme, a popular chain of doughnut stores, was started in North Carolina; the company's headquarters are in Winston-Salem. Despite its name, the hotsauce Texas Pete was created in North Carolina; its headquarters are also in Winston-Salem. The Hardees fast-food chain was started in Greenville. Another fast-food chain, Bojangles', was started in Charlotte, and has its corporate headquarters there. A popular North Carolina restaurant chain is Golden Corral. Started in 1973, the chain was founded in Fayetteville. The current Pepsi logo Pepsi-Cola (often shortened to Pepsi), is a carbonated cola soft drink manufactured by PepsiCo, and the principal rival of Coca-Cola. ... New Bern redirects here. ... A soft drink is a drink that contains no alcohol. ... Sundrop is a citrus-flavored soda produced by Cadbury-Schweppes. ... Cheerwine Cheerwine is a soft drink produced by the Carolina Beverage Corporation of Salisbury, North Carolina. ... Krispy Kreme is a chain of doughnut stores. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... Texas Pete is a retail brand name for a tabasco hot sauce in the United States. ... Hardees, founded in Greenville, North Carolina, is a US fast-food restaurant which has been frequently criticized for its especially low hamburger quality that was kept afloat largely on the shoulders of its superb breakfast menu. ... For other places with the same name, see Greenville. ... Bojangles is a regional chain of fast food restaurants in the United States, specializing in fried chicken and biscuits. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Golden Corral is a family-style restaurant that features a large buffet and grill offering 150 hot and cold items, a carving station and their Brass Bell Bakery. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ...


Ships named for the state

Several ships have been named for the state. Most famous is the USS North Carolina, a World War II battleship. The ship served in several battles against the forces of Imperial Japan in the Pacific theater during the war. Now decommissioned, it is part of the USS North Carolina Battleship Memorial in Wilmington. Another USS North Carolina, a nuclear attack submarine, is to be commissioned in 2008.[58] Four ships of the United States Navy (and one of the Confederate States Navy) have been named USS North Carolina in honor of the 12th state. ... See USS North Carolina for other Navy ships of the same name. ... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... The Pacific Ocean theater was one of four major theaters of the Pacific War, between 1941 and 1945. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USS North Carolina (SSN-777), a Virginia-class submarine, will be the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the 12th state. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ...


State symbols

Strawberry, North Carolina state red berry
Strawberry, North Carolina state red berry

Image File history File links StrawberryWatercolor. ... Image File history File links StrawberryWatercolor. ... For other uses, see Strawberry (disambiguation). ... Official state symbols of the U.S. state of North Carolina, listed in the order adopted by the North Carolina General Assembly: State motto: Esse quam videri (To be, rather than to seem), adopted 1893 State song: The Old North State, adopted 1927 State flower: Dogwood (Cornus florida), adopted 1941... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Esse quam videri is a Latin phrase meaning To be, rather than to seem. It has been used as motto by a number of different groups. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Subgenera Cornus Benthamidia Swida The Dogwoods comprise a group of 30-50 species of deciduous woody plants (shrubs and trees) in the family Cornaceae, divided into one to nine genera or subgenera (depending on botanical interpretation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... This is a list of U.S. state colors:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The flag of North Carolina is defined by law as follows That the flag of North Carolina shall consist of a blue union, containing in the center thereof a white star with the letter N in gilt on the left and the letter C in gilt on the right of... Union Jack. ... The North Carolina State Toast was adopted by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1957: Heres to the land of the long leaf pine, The summer land where the sun doth shine, Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great, Heres to Down Home, the Old... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... This is a list of official state shells:[1] References ^ List of all state shells http://www. ... Trinomial name Semicassis granulata granulata The Scotch Bonnet or Ridged Bonnet (IPA: ) is a seashell. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin, 1788 The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a tree squirrel that is native to the eastern to midwestern United States and the eastern provinces of Canada. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), also known as channel bass, redfish, puppy drum or just red, is a game fish that is found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Northern Mexico. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies North-west of Europe South-west of Europe Middle East Africa Synonyms Apis mellifica Linnaeus, 1761 The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ Official Alabama Reptile. ... Identification The Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is a member of the Box Turtle species. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... In 1987, the North Carolina General Assembly proclaimed the shad boat the Official State Historic Boat. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Plott Hound is a large scent hound, specifically a coonhound, originally bred for hunting boar. ... Oak Ridge Military Academy (ORMA) is a military school located in northwestern Guilford County, North Carolina. ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name (L.) Lam. ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... For other uses, see Strawberry (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... For other uses, see Blueberry (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state foods: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Categories: Stub | Fruit | Grape varieties ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Lilium michauxii, commonly known as the Carolina Lily, can be found in the Southeastern United States from West Virginia in the north to Florida in the south to Texas in the west. ... Binomial name Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir. ... For other uses, see Venus Flytrap (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Clogging is a traditional type of percussive folk dance which is associated with a number of different regions across the world. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The Shag is a form of swing dancing that evolved from the jitterbug and jump blues of the big band jazz era and originated at Carolina Beach, North Carolina during the 1940s. ... This article is about the species of fish. ... Seagrove is a town located in Randolph County, North Carolina. ...

Armed Forces installations

According to Governor Easley, North Carolina is the "most military friendly state in the nation."[60] Fort Bragg, near Fayetteville is the largest and most comprehensive military base in the United States and is the headquarters of the XVIII Airborne Corps, 82nd Airborne Division, and the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. Serving as the airwing for Fort Bragg is Pope Air Force Base also located near Fayetteville. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune which, when combined with nearby bases Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, MCAS New River, Camp Geiger, Camp Johnson, Stone Bay and Courthouse Bay, makes up the largest concentration of Marines and sailors in the world. MCAS Cherry Point is home of the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. Located in Goldsboro, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is home of the 4th Fighter Wing and 916th Air Refueling Wing. One of the busiest air stations in the United States Coast Guard is located at the Coast Guard Air Station in Elizabeth City. Troopers of the 82nd training on Fort Bragg Paratroopers in training at Fort Bragg Fort Bragg is a major United States Army installation, in Cumberland and Hoke Counties, North Carolina, USA, near Fayetteville. ... Nickname: Location of Fayetteville, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1762 Government  - Mayor Anthony G. Chavonne  - City Manager Dale E. Iman Area  - Total 60. ... A military base is a facility directly owned and operated by and/or for the military or one of its branches that shelters military equipment and personnel, and facilitates training and operations. ... Patch of the XVIII Airborne Corps. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on August 5, 1917, and was organized on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... USASOC shoulder sleeve patch. ... Pope Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force Base in Cumberland County, North Carolina, United States. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is near Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point is a United States airfield near New Bern, North Carolina, in the eastern part of the state. ... Marine Corps Air Station New River is a helicopter base near Jacksonville, North Carolina, in the eastern part of the state. ... Camp Geiger is a United States Marine Corps Base. ... Based on the south side of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. ... Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point is a United States airfield near New Bern, North Carolina, in the eastern part of the state. ... Official force name Second Marine Aircraft Wing Other names 2 MAW The Wing Branch United States Marine Corps Chain of Command II MEF Description Combat ready expeditionary aviation forces. ... Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Founded / Incorporated 1787 / 1847 Government  - Mayor Alfonzo Al King Area  - City 64. ... F-15Es preparing to taxi at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. ... The 4th Fighter Wing is a F-15E Strike Eagle unit based at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base , North Carolina. ... The 916th Air Refueling Wing (916 ARW) is a wing of the United States Air Force based out of Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City was commissioned on August 15, 1940 with four officers, 52 enlisted men and ten aircraft including three Hall PH-2 seaplanes, four Fairchild J2K landplanes, and three Grumman J2F amphibians. ... Nickname: Location in Pasquotank and Camden counties in the state of North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina Counties Pasquotank and Camden Government  - Mayor Rev. ...


See also

Areas included within the Appalachian Regional Commissions charter. ... List of incorporated municipalities (cities, towns, and village) in the United States state of North Carolina: Municipalities in North Carolina larger than 5,000 in population (according to the 2000 U.S. Census): Charlotte - 558,549 Raleigh - 281,915 Greensboro - 224,035 Durham - 201,726 Winston-Salem - 185,779 Fayetteville... List of North Carolina counties: Alamance County Alexander County Alleghany County Anson County Ashe County Avery County Beaufort County Bertie County Bladen County Brunswick County Buncombe County Burke County Cabarrus County Caldwell County Camden County Carteret County Caswell County Catawba County Chatham County Cherokee County Chowan County Clay County Cleveland... List of Registered Historic Places in North Carolina: Alamance Alamance Battleground State Historic Site L. Banks Holt House Altamahaw Altamahaw Mill Office Bellemont Bellemont Mill Village Historic District Kernodle-Pickett House Burlington Alamance Hotel Allen House Atlantic Bank and Trust Company Building Downtown Burlington Historic District East Davis Street Historic... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of people from North Carolina. ... There have been 40 executions in North Carolina, under the current statute, since it was adopted in 1977. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // List of Governors Roanake Colony, 1585 - 1586 Ralph Lane, 1585 - 1586 John White, 1587 Proprietary Colony, 1664-1731 Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689 William Drummond 1664-1667 Samuel Stephens 1667-1669 Peter Carteret 1670-1672 John Jenkins 1672-1675 Thomas Eastchurch 1675-1676 John Jenkins 1676-1677 Thomas Miller 1677... It has been suggested that List of famous North Carolinians be merged into this article or section. ... Asheville Citizen-Times - Asheville, North Carolina Charlotte Observer [1] - Charlotte, North Carolina The Chapel Hill News Herald-Sun - Durham, North Carolina The Daily Advance Elizabeth City, North Carolina Fayetteville Observer [2] - Fayetteville, North Carolina Greensboro News & Record [3] - Greensboro, North Carolina The Kinston Free Press [[4]] - Kinston, North Carolina The... This is a List of radio stations in North Carolina: 88. ... For a list of North Carolina television stations by channel number order, see List of television stations in North Carolina (by channel number). ... Avon, North Carolina Bartons Creek Township, Wake County, North Carolina Bloomingdale, North Carolina Bonsal, North Carolina Buckhorn Township, Wake County, North Carolina Bynum, North Carolina Cary Township, Wake County, North Carolina Cedar Fork Township, Wake County, North Carolina Cherokee, North Carolina Cullowhee, North Carolina Davidson, North Carolina Deep Gap, North... The following is a partial list of named, but unincorporated communities in the state of North Carolina. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The North Carolina Award is the highest civilian award bestowed by the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 5 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 15 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 26 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of North Carolina. ... The North Carolina Highway Patrol is the highway patrol agency for North Carolina, which has jurisdiction anywhere in the state. ... The Order of the Long Leaf Pine is the highest civilian honor that can be granted to a civilian in the state of North Carolina, which is located in the Southern United States. ... Pulled pork is a very famous way to cook the pork shoulder, Originated in North Carolina. ... Scouting in North Carolina has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ... This article seeks to serve as a field-guide, central repository, listing, and tour-guide for the flora and fauna of North Carolina and surrounding territories. ... The State of Franklin The State of Franklin was an autonomous, secessionist territory of the United States created, not long after the end of the American Revolution, from territory that had been ceded by North Carolina to the federal government. ...

References

  1. ^ North Carolina Climate and Geography. NC Kids Page. North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State (May 8, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  2. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  3. ^ The Colony At Roanoke. The National Center for Public Policy Research. Retrieved on 2008-02-23.
  4. ^ national and state population estimates. Annual Population Estimates 2000 to 2006. US Census Bureau (2006-12-22). Retrieved on 2006-12-22.
  5. ^ Watersheds. NC Office of Environmental Education (2007-02-16).
  6. ^ NOAA National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  7. ^ Randinelli, Tracey. Tanglewood Park. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt, 16. ISBN 0-15-333476-2. 
  8. ^ http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/NC/HISTORY/HISTORY.HTM North Carolina State Library - North Carolina History
  9. ^ Fenn and Wood, Natives and Newcomers, pp. 24-25
  10. ^ Powell, North Carolina Through Four Centuries, p. 105
  11. ^ Lefler and Newsome, (1973)
  12. ^ Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland and Delaware, Accessed 15 Feb 2008
  13. ^ The Great Seal of North Carolina. NETSTATE. Retrieved on 2006-09-12.
  14. ^ Lefler and Newsome, (1973)
  15. ^ Lefler and Newsome, (1973)
  16. ^ John Hope Franklin, Free Negroes of North Carolina, 1789-1860, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1941, reprint, 1991
  17. ^ NC Business History
  18. ^ Historical Census Browser, 1860 US Census, University of Virginia, accessed 21 Mar 2008
  19. ^ Lefler and Newsome, (1973)
  20. ^ North Carolina QuickFacts.
  21. ^ Table 1: Estimates of Population Change for the United States and States, and for Puerto Rico and State Rankings: July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006. United States Census Bureau. December 22, 2006. Last accessed December 22, 2006.
  22. ^ Contemporary Migration in North Carolina.
  23. ^ State Centers.
  24. ^ County Population Growth 2010 - 2020. North Carolina State Demographics. Retrieved on 2008-02-23.
  25. ^ Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland and Delaware
  26. ^ [1]
  27. ^ David Hackett Fischer, Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America, New York: Oxford University Press, 1989, pp.632-639
  28. ^ Amanda Greene, "Small Group Fights to Save Historic Orthodox Church," Greensboro News and Record, 17 December 2007
  29. ^ Tribes and Organizations. North Carolina Department of Administration. Retrieved on 2008-02-23.
  30. ^ State Rankings -- Statistical Abstract of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau (2004-07). Retrieved on 2006-12-17.
  31. ^ Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland and Delaware
  32. ^ a b Martinez, Rick (2005-12-12). Immigration Hits ‘Critical Mass’ in NC. Carolina Journal. Retrieved on 2007-01-04.
  33. ^ See a report on immigration by The Center for New North Carolinians of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, entitled Ethnic Groups in North Carolina. Retrieved July 29, 2007.
  34. ^ American Religious Identification Survey. Exhibit 15. The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Retrieved on 2008-04-15.
  35. ^ Gross State Product. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (2006-06-23). Retrieved on 2006-09-12.
  36. ^ Per Capita Personal Income. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (September 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-23.
  37. ^ Fishman, China, Inc.: How the Rise of the Next Superpower Challenges America and the World, p. 179
  38. ^ http://www.soc.duke.edu/NC_GlobalEconomy/textiles/overview.php
  39. ^ NC Department of Commerce Wine and Grape Industry web site.
  40. ^ (April 29, 2007) Time for tobacco burning out in N.C.. Associated Press. 
  41. ^ North Carolina Research Campus. Retrieved on 2006-12-17.
  42. ^ Sales and Use Tax. North Carolina Department of Revenue (10/18/06). Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  43. ^ Change in Dare County Sales and Use Tax Rate
  44. ^ a b The Facts on North Carolina’s Tax Climate. Tax Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  45. ^ Hartgen, David T. and Ravi K. Karanam (2007). 16th Annual Report on the Performance of State Highway Systems (PDF). Reason Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-10-20.
  46. ^ Hogarth, Susan (2005). Special LPNC Announcement: First victory in LPNC Lawsuit!!!. Libertarian Party of North Carolina. Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  47. ^ Michael J. Klarman, From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality, New York: Oxford University Press, 2006, p.30
  48. ^ Richard H. Pildes, "Democracy, Anti-Democracy, and the Canon", Constitutional Commentary, Vol.17, 2000, p. 27, accessed 10 Mar 2008
  49. ^ Albert Shaw, The American Monthly Review of Reviews, Vol. XXII, Jul-Dec 1900, pp. 273-274, accessed 27 Mar 2008
  50. ^ Richard H. Pildes, "Democracy, Anti-Democracy, and the Canon", Constitutional Commentary, Vol.17, 2000, pp. 12-13, accessed 10 Mar 2008
  51. ^ Historical Census Browser, 1960 US Census, University of Virginia, accessed 13 Mar 2008
  52. ^ North Carolina State Legislature. (NC § 90‑94) / (NC § 90‑95 subs 4).
  53. ^ [2]
  54. ^ North Carolina Department of Public Instruction.
  55. ^ a b North Carolina Public Schools Quick Facts.
  56. ^ Best of North Carolina Beaches.
  57. ^ What To Do Across North Carolina. VisitNC.com (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  58. ^ NAVY NAMES FOURTH VIRGINIA CLASS SUBMARINE. Retrieved on 2007-12-22. “North Carolina (SSN 777) will be built by General Dynamics Electric Boat Division”
  59. ^ Secretary of State of North Carolina.
  60. ^ State of North Carolina - Office of the Governor (2006-05-13). "GOV. EASLEY VOWS TO KEEP N.C. MOST MILITARY FRIENDLY STATE IN THE NATION". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-06-23.

is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • William S. Powell and Jay Mazzocchi, eds. Encyclopedia of North Carolina (2006) 1320pp; 2000 articles by 550 experts on all topics; ISBN 0-8078-3071-2
  • James Clay and Douglas Orr, eds., North Carolina Atlas: Portrait of a Changing Southern State (University of North Carolina Press, 1971).
  • Crow; Jeffrey J. and Larry E. Tise; Writing North Carolina History University of North Carolina Press, (1979) online
  • Fleer; Jack D. North Carolina Government & Politics University of Nebraska Press, (1994) online political science textbook
  • Marianne M. Kersey and Ran Coble, eds., North Carolina Focus: An Anthology on State Government, Politics, and Policy, 2d ed., (Raleigh: North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research, 1989).
  • Lefler; Hugh Talmage. A Guide to the Study and Reading of North Carolina History University of North Carolina Press, (1963) online
  • Hugh Talmage Lefler and Albert Ray Newsome, North Carolina: The History of a Southern State University of North Carolina Press (1954, 1963, 1973), college textbook
  • Paul Luebke, Tar Heel Politics: Myths and Realities (University of North Carolina Press, 1990).
  • William S. Powell, North Carolina through Four Centuries University of North Carolina Press (1989), college textbook.

William S. (Bill) Powell is a North Carolina historian, scholar and author of several important reference works on the state of North Carolina. ... William S. (Bill) Powell is a North Carolina historian, scholar and author of several important reference works on the state of North Carolina. ...

Primary sources

  • Hugh Lefler, North Carolina History Told by Contemporaries (University of North Carolina Press, numerous editions since 1934)
  • H. G. Jones, North Carolina Illustrated, 1524-1984 (University of North Carolina Press, 1984)
  • North Carolina Manual, published biennially by the Department of the Secretary of State since 1941.

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Preceded by
New York
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on November 21, 1789 (12th)
Succeeded by
Rhode Island

Coordinates: 35.5° N 80° W These are tables of congressional delegations from North Carolina to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of North Carolina: Charles Laban Abernethy Evan Shelby Alexander Hugh Quincy Alexander Nathaniel Alexander Sydenham Benoni Alexander Willis Alston Ike Franklin Andrews Robert Franklin Armfield Archibald Hunter Arrington John Baptista Ashe Thomas Samuel Ashe William Shepperd Ashe John Wilbur... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... George Kenneth Butterfield, Jr. ... Bobby Ray Bob Etheridge (born August 7, 1941) is a member of the United States House of Representatives from North Carolina, representing that states 2nd congressional district (map). ... Walter Beaman Jones, Jr. ... Rep. ... Virginia Foxx (born June 29, 1943) is a Republican Congresswoman from the 5th Congressional district of North Carolina (see[map]) first elected in 2004. ... Rep. ... Rep. ... Robert Robin Hayes (born August 14, 1945) is a Republican Congressman from North Carolina. ... Sue Wilkins Myrick is a North Carolina congresswoman; she has represented North Carolinas 9th Congressional district (map) in the United States House of Representatives since 1995. ... Patrick Timothy McHenry (born October 22, 1975) is a United States Representative from North Carolina, representing the states 10th Congressional district (see map), and currently the so-called Baby of the House in the United States House of Representatives. ... Joseph Heath Shuler (born December 31, 1971) is an American politician and former professional football player. ... Rep. ... Ralph Bradley Brad Miller (born May 19, 1953) is an American lawyer and politician from North Carolina, currently representing the states Thirteenth District in the U.S. House of Representatives. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Alabama to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Alaska to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... These are complete tables of congressional delegations from Arizona to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Arkansas to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from California in the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... 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Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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North Carolina State University :: Welcome to North Carolina State University (414 words)
North Carolina State University :: Welcome to North Carolina State University
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North Carolina State University   Raleigh, NC 27695   Phone: (919) 515-2011
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: North Carolina (3218 words)
It is bounded on the north by Virginia, east and south-east by the Atlantic Ocean, south by South Carolina and Georgia, and west and north-west by Tennessee.
The climate is generally equable, and North Carolina produces nearly all the crops grown in the United States with the exception of sub-tropical cane and fruits.
North Carolina was originally inhabited by various tribes of Indians, the three principal ones being the Tuscaroras in the east, the Catawbas in the centre, and the Cherokees in the west.
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