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Encyclopedia > Norse dwarves

In Norse mythology, the dwarves (Old Norse: dvergar, sing. dvergr) are highly significant entities associated with stones, the underground and forging. Apart from the Eddas, they notably appear in the fornaldarsagas. They seem to be interchangeable and may be identical with the svartálfar (black elves), and sometimes the trolls (compare also with vetter, a class of beings from later Scandinavian folklore). The Völuspá divides the dwarves into what may be three tribes, lead by respectively Mótsognir, their first ruler; secondly Durinn, and finally Dvalinn, who according to the Hávamál brought them the art of rune writing. Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... This page is about a mythological race. ... This is the approximate extent of Old Norse and related languages in the early 10th century. ... This article is about smithing. ... For Edda great-grandmother as the ancestress of serfs see Ríg. ... A Fornaldarsaga deals with matter that took place in Scandinavia (and a few distant places) before the colonization of Iceland. ... In Norse mythology, the svartálfar (black elves) or dökkálfar (dark elves) are supernatural beings (Old Norse vættir, wights) that are said to reside in the underground world of Svartálfheim. ... Trolls with an abducted princess (John Bauer, 1915) A troll is a fearsome member of a mythical anthropomorph race from Scandinavian folklore. ... Wight is an obsolete word for a human or other intelligent being (cognate to modern German Wicht, meaning small person, dwarf, and also unpleasant guy). It is used now only to give an impression of archaism and mystery, for example in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Scandinavian folklore is the folklore of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... Viewed historically or developmentally, a tribe consists of a social formation existing before the development of, or outside of, states. ... In Norse mythology, Dvalin was a ruler of the dwarves and one of the most powerful dwarves, known primarily for having invented runes. ... Hávamál (The Words of the High One), (known also as The Sayings of Har, or the High Song of Odin), a work of Old Norse poetry, is a source document for the study of Norse mythology, being a set of rules for wise living (and survival) purportedly written... Younger Futhark inscription on the Vaksala Runestone The Runic alphabets are a set of related alphabets using letters known as runes, formerly used to write Germanic languages, mainly in Scandinavia and the British Isles. ...


The dwarves came into existence while Odin and his brothers Vili and Vé fabricated the world from the corpse of the cosmic giant Ymir. They spontaneously generated, like maggots in the dead flesh (i.e. earth or stone). The gods later gifted them with intelligence and human-like appearance. The dwarves are described rather ugly to the human eye, though there is little to indicate that they diminished at all from human size. They fear sunlight, which might even turn them into the stone they sprang from. Their dwelling place is the underground realm of Nidavellir, one of the nine worlds fixed to the world-tree Yggdrasil according to Norse cosmology. For other meanings of Odin see Odin (disambiguation) Odin (Old Norse Óðinn) is considered the highest god in Norse mythology and Norse paganism, like West Germanic Woden continuing Proto-Germanic *Wodanaz His name is related to óðr, meaning excitation, fury or poetry, and his role, like many of the Norse... Vili was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Ve was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr. ... The giants seize Freyja. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Ymir (moon). ... Abiogenesis, in its most general sense, is the hypothetical generation of life from non-living matter. ... Nidavellir is the land of the dwarves in Norse mythology. ... This illustration shows a 19th century attempt to visualize the world view of the Prose Edda. ... Norse cosmology, as it is given us in the source material for Norse mythology recognizes the existence of nine worlds, assigned the ending -heimr (home, realm, or world) or in some cases -garðr (homestead, yard or earth). ...


They are mostly seen as selfish, greedy, and cunning. They are skilled metal-workers and the makers of most of the artifacts of the gods, both Æsir and Vanir. Among their most famous creations are the spear Gungnir and the golden ring Draupnir of Odin, Mjolnir the hammer of Thor, the golden hair of Sif, Freyja's necklace Brísingamen and even the ship Skíðblaðnir of Freyr. The dwarves also fabricated a certain kind of helmet, called huliðshjálmr (concealing helmet), or sometimes a cloak, with which they could make themselves invisible. (Once more, cf. wights.) They are also vengeful and Hervarar saga relates that when king Svafrlami had forced the dwarves Dvalin and Durin to forge the magic sword Tyrfing, the dwarves cursed it so it would bring death to Svafrlami and cause three evil deeds. In Ynglingatal it is told how King Sveigder is lured into a stone by a dwarf. This article is about deities or gods from a non-monotheistic perspective. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Áss, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic *Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ... Vanir is the name of one of the two groups of gods in Norse mythology, the other and more well known being the Æsir. ... In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni or Gungner was the name of Odins spear. ... Draupnir is a golden arm ring possessed by Odin, the ruling god of Norse mythology. ... Drawing of an archeological find of a gold plated hammer in silver. ... Thor carries his hammer and wears his belt of strength in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This early 20th century depiction of Sif shows her with long blond hair. ... Freyja in Wagners operas See Freya radar for German World War II radar. ... Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Brisingamen is said to be the (principally amber) necklace of the goddess Freya from Norse Mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Skíðblaðnir (the name can be anglicized as Skídbladnir, Skídhbladhnir, Skíthblathnir, Skidbladnir, Skithblathnir or Skidhbladhnir) is the ship of Freyr. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... Pickelhaube of a Swedish Royal Guard soldier For other uses, see Helmet (band) A helmet (a 15th century loan from Middle French, a diminutive of Frankish helm, from Proto-Germanic *khelmaz, PIE *kelmo- a cover) is a form of protective clothing worn on the head and usually made of metal... A cloak is a type of loose garment which is worn over indoor clothing and serves the same purpose as an overcoat – it protects the wearer from the cold, rain or wind for example, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit (e. ... Wight is an obsolete word for a human or other intelligent being (cognate to modern German Wicht, meaning small person, dwarf, and also unpleasant person). It is used only comparatively recently to give an impression of archaism and mystery, for example in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Hervarar saga ok Heidhreks is a fornaldarsaga from the 13th century using material from an older saga. ... Svafrlami (in the H and U version of the Hervarar saga. ... In Norse mythology, Dvalin was a ruler of the dwarves and one of the most powerful dwarves, known primarily for having invented runes. ... Durin is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... For other uses see Tyrfing (disambiguation) Tyrfing or Tirfing was a magic sword which figures in a poem from the Elder Edda called The Waking of Angantýr, and in Hervarar saga. ... Ynglingatal is a poem listing the kings of the House of Ynglings. ... Sveigder or Swegde was a Swedish king of the House of Yngling in Norse mythology. ...


They could also be minor deities, much like the (light) elves, which suggests how they could have accuired the name of dark or black elves (see also: elf versus dwarf). The dwarves Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri support the four cardinal points. Nýi and Niði governs the waxing and waning lunar phase, respectively. A small forest elf (älva) rescuing an egg, from Solägget (1932), by Elsa Beskow An elf is a mythical creature of Norse mythology which survived in northern European folklore. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cardinal directions or cardinal points are the four principal directions or points of the compass, north, east, south and west. ... In astronomy, a phase of the Moon is any of the aspects or appearances presented by the Moon as seen from Earth, determined by the portion of the Moon that is visibly illuminated by the Sun. ...


Their role at Ragnarök is not clear, Völuspá only mentions that: Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ...

How fare the gods?
how fare the elves?
All Jotunheim groans,
the gods are at council;
Loud roar the dwarfs
by the doors of stone,
The masters of the rocks;
would you know yet more?"

Note:J. R. R. Tolkien was the first to use the plural Dwarves before hand it had always be Dwarfs similiarly Elfs and Elves) Jotunheim is the world of the giants (two types: rock and frost, collectively called Jotuns) in the Norse Mythology. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ...


List of Norse dwarves

Völuspá 10–16 contains a list of dwarves: Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ...

9. Then sought the gods their assembly-seats,
The holy ones, and council held,
To find who should raise the race of dwarfs
Out of Brimir's blood and the legs of Blain.
10. There was Motsognir the mightiest made
Of all the dwarfs, and Durin next;
Many a likeness of men they made,
The dwarfs in the earth, as Durin said.
11. Nyi and Nithi, Northri and Suthri,
Austri and Vestri, Althjof, Dvalin,
Nar and Nain, Niping, Dain,
Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Nori,
An and Onar, Ai, Mjothvitnir,
12. Vigg and Gandalf, Vindalf, Thrain,
Thekk and Thorin, Thror, Vit and Lit,
Nyr and Nyrath,
Regin and Rathvith — now have I told the list aright.
13. Fili, Kili, Fundin, Nali,
Heptifili, Hannar, Sviur,
Frar, Hornbori, Fræg and Loni,
Aurvang, Jari, Eikinskjaldi.
14. The race of the dwarfs in Dvalin's throng
Down to Lofar the list must I tell;
The rocks they left, and through the wet lands
They sought a home in the fields of sand.
15. There were Draupnir and Dolgthrasir,
Hor, Haugspori, Hlevang, Gloin,
Dori, Ori, Duf, Andvari,
Skirfir, Virfir, Skafith, Ai.
16. Alf and Yngvi, Eikinskjaldi;
Fjalar and Frosti, Fith and Ginnar;
So for all time shall the tale be known,
The list of all the forbears of Lofar.

For the moon of Saturn, see Ymir (moon). ... Durin is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In Norse mythology, Nýi and Niði (New and Nether) were the two dwarves who governed the waxing and waning lunar phase, respectively. ... In Norse mythology, Nýi and Niði (New and Nether) were the two dwarves who governed the waxing and waning lunar phase, respectively. ... In Norse mythology, Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri (Northern, Southern, Eastern and Western) were four dwarves who each supported one of the four cardinal points. ... In Norse mythology, Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri (Northern, Southern, Eastern and Western) were four dwarves who each supported one of the four cardinal points. ... In Norse mythology, Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri (Northern, Southern, Eastern and Western) were four dwarves who each supported one of the four cardinal points. ... In Norse mythology, Norðri, Suðri, Austri and Vestri (Northern, Southern, Eastern and Western) were four dwarves who each supported one of the four cardinal points. ... In Norse mythology, Dvalin was a ruler of the dwarves and one of the most powerful dwarves, known primarily for having invented runes. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Hobbit, Bifur the fictional Dwarf was a companion to Bilbo Baggins and Thorin Oakenshield on the quest of Erebor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens The Hobbit, Bofur the fictional Dwarf was a companion to Bilbo Baggins and Thorin Oakenshield on the quest of Erebor. ... In the The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, Bombur is a fat Dwarf who accompanies Thorin Oakenshield and Bilbo Baggins on their journey to Erebor. ... Nori (æµ·è‹”) is a Japanese term used to refer to edible varieties of seaweed in the various species of the red alga Porphyra, including most notably and . ... In Norse mythology, according to the Gylfaginning, Annar (Old Norse Annarr second, another) was the father of Jörd Earth by Nótt Night. The form Ónar (Old Norse Ónarr gaping) is found as a variant. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In Norse mythology, Regin was the son of Hreidmar and foster father of Sigurd. ... See Fíli and Kíli for the Dwarves appearing in The Hobbit. ... Fíli and Kíli are fictional characters in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Dwarf Fundin was the son of Farin, the brother of Gróin, and the father of Balin and Dwalin, two of Thorin Oakenshields companions on the Quest of Erebor. ... Nali or Nalî(1798-1855), was a Kurdish poet. ... LOFAR is the Low Frequency ARray for radio astronomy. ... Draupnir is a golden arm ring possessed by Odin, the ruling god of Norse mythology. ... Glóin is a the name of two fictional characters of J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Ori is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In Norse mythology, Andvari was a dwarf. ... Yngvi, Ingui or Ing appears to have been the older name for the god Freyr, which meant lord. In Scandinavian mythology, Yngvi, alternatively Yngve, was the progenitor of the Yngling lineage, a legendary dynasty of Swedish kings from whom the earliest historical Norwegian kings in turn claimed to be descended... In Norse mythology, Fjalar and his brother, Galar, were dwarves who killed Kvasir and turned his blood into the mead of poetry, which inspired poets. ... Fornjót (Old Norse Fornjótr) is an ancient giant in Norse mythology, the father of Kári (a personification of wind), of Logi (a personification of fire), and of Hlér or Ægir (the ruler of the sea). ...

See also

J. R. R. Tolkien got some of the names of the dwarves in his books from the Völuspá, see Dwarves (Middle-earth). In Norse mythology, Brokk is a dwarf, brother of Eitri. ... In Norse mythology, Eitri is a dwarf, brother of Brokk. ... In Norse mythology, Fafnir was a son of the dwarf king Hreidmar and brother of Regin and Otr. ... In Norse mythology, Fjalar and his brother, Galar, were dwarves who killed Kvasir and turned his blood into the mead of poetry, which inspired poets. ... In Norse mythology, Hreidmar was the avaricious king of the dwarf folk, who captured three gods with his unbreakable chains. ... OTR may refer to: Old-time radio, a term describing an era of radio programmes in the first half of the 20th century. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... The Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth are beings of short stature who all possess beards, and are often friendly with Hobbits although long suspicious of Elves. ...


See also

Norse mythology A dwarf (plural dwarfs or, more recently, dwarves -- see under Tolkien below) is a short humanoid creature in Norse mythology, fairy tales, fantasy fiction and role-playing games. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A small forest elf (älva) rescuing an egg, from Solägget (1932), by Elsa Beskow An elf is a mythical creature of Norse mythology which survived in northern European folklore. ... The giants seize Freyja. ... Trolls with an abducted princess (John Bauer, 1915) A troll is a fearsome member of a mythical anthropomorph race from Scandinavian folklore. ... Wight is an obsolete word for a human or other intelligent being (cognate to modern German Wicht, meaning small person, dwarf, and also unpleasant person). It is used only comparatively recently to give an impression of archaism and mystery, for example in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Image File history File links Mjollnir_icon. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology comprises the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ...

List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns
Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freya | Loki | Balder | Tyr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök
Sources:
Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle
Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society:
Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers
The nine worlds of Norse mythology | People, places and things

 
 

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