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Encyclopedia > Normative ethics

Normative ethics is the branch of the philosophical study of ethics concerned with classifying actions as right and wrong, as opposed to descriptive ethics. Normative ethics regards ethics as a set of norms related to actions. This article is 58 kilobytes or more in size. ... Ethics (from the Ancient Greek Ä“thikos, the adjective of Ä“thos custom, habit), a major branch of philosophy, is the study of values and customs of a person or group and covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right and wrong, good and evil, and responsibility. ... Descriptive ethics deal with what the population actually believes to be right and wrong, and holds up as ideals or condemns or punishes in law or politics, as contrasted to normative ethics which deals with what the population should believe to be right and wrong, and such concepts as sin... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Action, as a concept in philosophy, is what humans can do. ...


Descriptive ethics deal with what the population believes to be right and wrong, while normative ethics deal with what the population should believe to be right and wrong.


Moreover, because it examines standards for the rightness and wrongness of actions, normative ethics is distinct from meta-ethics, which studies the nature of moral statements, and from applied ethics, which places normative rules in practical contexts. In philosophy, meta-ethics or analytic ethics [1] is the branch of ethics that seeks to understand the nature of ethical properties, and ethical statements, attitudes, and judgments. ... Applied ethics takes a theory of ethics, such as utilitarianism, social contract theory, or deontology, and applies its major principles to a particular set of circumstances and practices. ...


Normative ethics theories

  • Consequentialism argues that the morality of an action is contingent on the action's outcome or result. Some consequentialist theories include:
    • Utilitarianism, which holds that an action is right if it leads to the most pleasure (and least pain) for the greatest number of people (Maximizes goodness for all people).
    • Egoism, the belief that the moral person is the self-interested person, thus acting to maximize good for self.
  • Deontologism argues that decisions should be made considering the factors of one's duties and other's rights. Some deontological theories include:

Consequentialism refers to those moral theories that hold that the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgement about that action. ... Utilitarianism (1861), see Utilitarianism (book). ... Ethical egoism is belief that one ought to do what is in ones own self-interest, although a distinction should be made between what is really in ones self-interest and what is only apparently so (see psychological egoism). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... The really big super duper huge greg is gay categorical imperative is the central philosophical concept of the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant, and to modern deontological ethics. ... Social contract is a phrase used in philosophy, political science, and sociology to denote a real or hypothetical agreement within a state regarding the rights and responsibilities of the state and its citizens, or more generally a similar concord between a group and its members. ... John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American philosopher, a professor of political philosophy at Harvard University and author of A Theory of Justice (1971), Political Liberalism, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, and The Law of Peoples. ... “Hobbes” redirects here. ... This article is about John Locke, the English philosopher. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – March 7, 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe (March 18, 1919 – January 5, 2001) (known as Elizabeth Anscombe, published as G. E. M. Anscombe) was a British analytic philosopher, a theologian and a pupil of Ludwig Wittgenstein. ... Philippa Ruth Foot (1920-), born in Bosanquet, is a British philosopher, most notable for her works in ethics. ... Rosalind Hursthouse is a moral philosopher noted for her work on virtue ethics. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Normative ethics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (302 words)
Normative ethics is the branch of the philosophical study of ethics concerned with classifying actions as right and wrong, as opposed to descriptive ethics.
Normative ethics regards ethics as a set of norms related to actions.
Moreover, because it examines standards for the rightness and wrongness of actions, normative ethics is distinct from meta-ethics, which studies the nature of moral statements, and from applied ethics, which places normative rules in practical contexts.
Ethics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2619 words)
Ethics (from the Ancient Greek "ethikos", meaning "arising from habit") is one of the major branches of philosophy, one that covers the analysis and employment of concepts such as right, wrong, good, evil, and responsibility.
Normative ethicists who follow the third approach are often called utilitarians or consequentialists, and John Stuart Mill set out a large framework for a utilitarian normative ethics.
There are several sub-branches of applied ethics examining the ethical problems of different professions, such as business ethics, medical ethics, engineering ethics and legal ethics, while technology assessment and environmental assessment study the effects and implications of new technologies or projects on nature and society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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