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Encyclopedia > Norman Rockwell
Norman Percy Rockwell
Photographic portrait of Rockwell
Born 3 February 1894
New York City, NY, USA
Died November 8, 1978 (aged 84)
Stockbridge, MA, USA
Occupation Painter
Spouse 1) Irene O'Connor (m. 1916 div. 1930)
2) Mary Barstow] (m. Apr 17 1930, her death) 3 children
3) Molly Punderson (m. Oct 25 1961, until his death)
Parents Jarvis Waring and Nancy (Hill) Rockwell
Children Jarvis Waring Rockwell
Thomas Rhodes Rockwell
Peter Barstow Rockwell

Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. His works enjoy a broad popular appeal in the United States, where Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life scenarios he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine over more than four decades. Among the best-known of Rockwell's works are Rosie the Riveter (although his Rosie was reproduced less than other Rosies of the area), Saying Grace (1951), and the Four Freedoms series. Download high resolution version (465x640, 37 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York_City. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Massachusetts. ... Stockbridge is a town in Berkshire County in Western Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... The following list is a partial list of painters. ... Thomas Rockwell (son of the American artist, Norman Rockwell) is the author of a number of books for young readers. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The following list is a partial list of painters. ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903 The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. ... Rosie the Riveter: We Can Do It! - Many women first found economic strength in World War II-era manufacturing jobs. ... Freedom of Speech Freedom of Worship. “Freedom From Fear” The Four Freedoms are goals famously articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the State of the Union Address he delivered to the 77th United States Congress on January 6, 1941. ...

Contents

Biography

Born on February 3, 1894, in New York City to Jarvis Waring and Nancy (Hill) Rockwell. He had one sibling, a brother, Jarvis. Rockwell transferred from high school to the Chase Art School at the age of 16. He then went on to the National Academy of Design, and finally, to the Art Students League, where he was taught by Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman. Rockwell's early works were done for St. Nicholas Magazine, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) publication Boys' Life, and other juvenile publications. Joseph Csatari carried on his legacy and style for the BSA. February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Main article: Secondary education High school is a name used in some parts of the world, and particularly in North America, to describe the last segment of compulsory education. ... The National Academy of Design, in New York City, now called simply The National Academy, is an honorary association of American artists, with a museum and a school of fine arts. ... The Art Students League of New York is an art school founded in 1875. ... George Brandt Bridgman (born in Canada in 1865 - died 1943) was a well known teacher of figure drawing. ... The St. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... The cover of Boys Life from July 1917. ... Joseph Csatari (b. ...


As a student, Rockwell was given smaller, less important jobs. His first major breakthrough came in 1912 at age 18 with his first book illustration for C.H. Claudy's Tell Me Why: Stories about Mother Nature.


Also, at age 19, in 1913, he became the art editor for Boys' Life, a post he held for several years. As part of fulfilling that position, he painted several covers between 1913 and 1915. His first published magazine cover, Scout at Ship's Wheel, appeared on Boys' Life September 1913 edition. Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The cover of Boys Life from July 1917. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... The cover of Boys Life from July 1917. ...

"Freedom of Speech".
"Freedom of Speech".

During the First World War, he tried to enlist into the U.S. Navy but was refused entry because, at 6 feet (1.83 m) tall and 140 pounds (64 kg), he was eight pounds underweight. To compensate, he spent one night gorging himself on bananas, liquids and donuts, and weighed enough to enlist the next day. However, he was given the role of a military artist and did not see any action during his tour of duty. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x620, 568 KB)Save Freedom of Speech is a color lithograph created in 1942 by Norman Rockwell and published in the Saturday Evening Post as part of a series illustrating the Four Freedoms. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (440x620, 568 KB)Save Freedom of Speech is a color lithograph created in 1942 by Norman Rockwell and published in the Saturday Evening Post as part of a series illustrating the Four Freedoms. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ...


Rockwell moved to New Rochelle, New York at age 21 and shared a studio with the cartoonist Clyde Forsythe, who worked for The Saturday Evening Post. With Forsythe's help, he submitted his first successful cover painting to the Post in 1916, Boy with Baby Carriage (published on May 20). He followed that success with Circus Barker and Strongman (published on June 3), Gramps at the Plate (August 5), Redhead Loves Hatty Perkins (September 16), People in a Theatre Balcony (October 14) and Man Playing Santa (December 9). Rockwell was published eight times total on the Post cover within the first twelve months. Norman Rockwell published 321 more covers for The Saturday Evening Post over the next 47 years. New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ... NY redirects here. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rockwell's success on the cover of the Post led to covers for other magazines of the day, most notably The Literary Digest, The Country Gentleman, Leslie's Weekly, Judge, Peoples Popular Monthly and Life Magazine. The Literary Digest was an influential general-interest magazine in the early 20th century United States. ... Leslies Weekly was an American magazine published in in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which among others published stories by H. Irving Hancock and Ellis Parker Butler. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “LIFE” redirects here. ...


Personal life

Rockwell married his first wife, Irene O'Connor, in 1916. Irene was Rockwell's model in Mother Tucking Children into Bed, published on the cover of The Literary Digest on January 19, 1921. However, the couple divorced in 1930. He quickly married schoolteacher Mary Barstow, with whom he had three children: Jarvis Waring, Thomas Rhodes and Peter Barstow. In 1939, the Rockwell family moved to Arlington, Vermont, which seemed to inspire him to paint scenes of everyday small town American life. The Literary Digest was an influential general-interest magazine in the early 20th century United States. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... Thomas Rockwell (son of the American artist, Norman Rockwell) is the author of a number of books for young readers. ... Arlington, Vermont Arlington is a town in Bennington County, Vermont, United States. ... Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked {{{AreaRank}}}  - Total {{{TotalAreaUS}}} sq mi ({{{TotalArea}}} km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ...


World War II

The rear of Norman Rockwell's preserved studio.
The rear of Norman Rockwell's preserved studio.

In 1943, during the Second World War, Rockwell painted the Four Freedoms series, which was completed in seven months and resulted in his losing 15 pounds. The series was inspired by a speech by Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had declared that there were four principles for universal rights: Freedom from Want, Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Worship, and Freedom from Fear. The paintings were published in 1943 by The Saturday Evening Post. The U.S. Treasury Department later promoted war bonds by exhibiting the originals in 16 cities. Rockwell himself considered "Freedom of Speech" to be the best of the four. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1875 KB) Summary The rear of Norman Rockwells studio. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1875 KB) Summary The rear of Norman Rockwells studio. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... FDR redirects here. ... Freedom of Speech Freedom of Worship. “Freedom From Fear” The Four Freedoms are goals famously articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the State of the Union Address he delivered to the 77th United States Congress on January 6, 1941. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... An American War Bonds poster from 1942 War bonds are a type of savings bond used by combatant nations to help fund a war effort. ...


That same year a fire in his studio destroyed numerous original paintings, costumes, and props. Later, in 1953, his wife Mary died unexpectedly, which resulted in Rockwell taking time off to grieve. It was during this break that he and his son Thomas produced his autobiography, My Adventures as an Illustrator, which was published in 1960. The Post printed excerpts from this book in eight consecutive issues, the first containing Rockwell's famous Triple Self-Portrait. A forest fire Fire is a rapid oxidation process that creates light, heat, smoke, and releases energy in varying intensities. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ...


During the late 1940s, Norman Rockwell spent the winter months as artist-in-residence at Otis College of Art and Design. Students occasionally were models for his Saturday Evening Post covers. In 1949, Rockwell donated an original Post cover, "April Fool," to be raffled off in a library fund raiser. Otis College of Art and Design is a four year art and design college located in Los Angeles, California. ... There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Civil Rights

Rockwell married his third wife, retired schoolteacher Molly Punderson, in 1961. His last painting for the Post was published in 1963, marking the end of a publishing relationship that had included 321 cover paintings. He spent the next 10 years painting for Look Magazine, where his work depicted his interests in civil rights, poverty and space exploration. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Space exploration is the physical exploration of outer space, both by human spaceflights and by robotic spacecraft. ...

Norman Rockwell

From [1] (cropped, scaled, optimized). ... From [1] (cropped, scaled, optimized). ...

Portraits

During his long career, he was commissioned to paint the portraits for Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, as well as those of foreign figures, including Gamal Abdel Nasser and Jawaharlal Nehru. One of his last works was a portrait of legendary singer Judy Garland in 1969. Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jawaharlal Nehru (Hindi: , IPA: , from Persian Javâher-e Laal, meaning Red Jewel) (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964) was a political leader of the Indian National Congress, was a pivotal figure during the Indian independence movement and served as the first Prime Minister of the Republic of India. ... Superscript text Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an Oscar-nominated American film actress, considered by many to be one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale from The...


Ability

Rockwell's ability to "get the point across" in one picture, and his flair for painstaking detail made him a favorite of the advertising industry. He was also commissioned to illustrate over 40 books including the ever-popular Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. His annual contributions for the Boy Scouts' calendars (1925 – 1976), were only slightly overshadowed by his most popular of calendar works: the "Four Seasons" illustrations for Brown & Bigelow that were published for 17 years beginning in 1947 and reproduced in various styles and sizes since 1964. Illustrations for booklets, catalogs, posters (particularly movie promotions), sheet music, stamps, playing cards, and murals (including "Yankee Doodle Dandy", which was completed in 1936 for the Nassau Inn in Princeton, New Jersey) rounded out Rockwell's œuvre as an illustrator. In his later years, Rockwell began receiving more attention as a painter when he chose more serious subjects such as the series on racism for Look. Another late career painting, Shuffleton's Barber Shop is considered by many critics to be one of his masterpieces. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tom Sawyer. ... Huckleberry Finn and Jim Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) is commonly accounted as the first Great American Novel. ... Some typical modern playing cards. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Armenian Genocide · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Blood libel · Black Legend Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Ku Klux Klan National Party (South Africa) American Nazi Party Kahanism · Supremacism Anti...


A custodianship of 574 of his original paintings and drawings was established with Rockwell's help near his home in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and the museum is still open today year round http://www.nrm.org. Rockwell received in 1977 the Presidential Medal of Freedom for "vivid and affectionate portraits of our country," the United States of America's highest civilian honor. Stockbridge is a town in Berkshire County in Western Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ...


Rockwell is a recipient of the Silver Buffalo Award, the highest adult award given by the Boy Scouts of America. The Silver Buffalo Award, created in 1925, is bestowed upon those adults who give truly noteworthy and extraordinary service to youth. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ...


Death

Norman Rockwell died November 8, 1978 of lung cancer at age 84 in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ...


Work

One of many Saturday Evening Post covers
One of many Saturday Evening Post covers
"The Problem We all Live with."
"The Problem We all Live with."

Norman Rockwell was very prolific, and produced over 4000 original works, most of which have been either destroyed by fire or are in permanent collections. Original magazines in mint condition that contain his work are extremely rare and can command thousands of dollars today. Image File history File links Norman Rockwells painting of The Rookie - a picture many people believe is about Mickey McDermott. ... Image File history File links Norman Rockwells painting of The Rookie - a picture many people believe is about Mickey McDermott. ... There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ... The Problem We All Live With, by Norman Rockwell This work is copyrighted. ... The Problem We All Live With, by Norman Rockwell This work is copyrighted. ...


Many of his works appear overly sweet in modern critics' eyes, especially the Saturday Evening Post covers, which tend toward idealistic or sentimentalized portrayals of American life—this has led to the often-depreciatory adjective Rockwellesque. Consequently, Rockwell is not considered a "serious painter" by some contemporary artists, who often regard his work as bourgeois and kitsch. Writer Vladmir Nabokov scorned brilliant technique put to "banal" use, and wrote in his book Pnin: "That Dalí is really Norman Rockwell's twin brother kidnapped by Gypsies in babyhood". He is called an "illustrator" instead of an artist by some critics, a designation he did not mind, as it was what he called himself. Yet, Rockwell sometimes produced images many considered powerful and moving. One example is The Problem We All Live With, which dealt with the issue of school integration. The painting depicts a young African American girl, Ruby Bridges, flanked by white federal marshals, walking to school past a wall defaced by racist graffiti. It is probably not an image that could have appeared on a magazine cover earlier in Rockwell's career, but it ranks among his best-known works today. Rockwellesque, or Norman Rockwellesque, is an adjective used chiefly in the United States to describe in an often depreciatory way something characteristic to the work of Norman Rockwell, particularly his idealistic, quaint, sentimentalized portrayals of American life. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... Kitsch (pronounced “kich” as in “rich”) is a term of German origin that has been used to categorize art that is considered an inferior copy of an existing style. ... Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Набоков; pronounced: vlah-DEE-meer nah-BAWK-awf) (April 10 O.S. [April 22/23 N.S.], 1899 - July 2, 1977) was a Russian-American author. ... Pnin is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1957. ... Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí Domènech Marquis of Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), popularly known as Salvador Dalí, was a Spanish (Catalan) artist and one of the most important painters of the 20th century. ... The Problem We All Live With, by Norman Rockwell This work is copyrighted. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Ruby Bridges Hall (born Ruby Nell Bridges September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi) moved with her parents to New Orleans, Louisiana at the age of two. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... United States Marshals star badge The United States Marshals Service (USMS) (sometimes incorrectly spelled “Marshals’ Service”) is an agency within the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 561) and is a federal police organization with special spheres of authority. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Armenian Genocide · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Blood libel · Black Legend Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Ku Klux Klan National Party (South Africa) American Nazi Party Kahanism · Supremacism Anti... Graffiti (strictly, as singular, graffito, from the Italian — graffiti being the plural) are images or letters applied without permission to publicly viewable surfaces such as walls or bridges. ...


Influence on film

"Freedom from Fear" re-creation in Hoot.
  • In the film Witness, an Amish mother and child (played by Kelly McGillis and Lukas Haas) bow their heads in prayer in a crowded diner, in a scene inspired by a Rockwell painting. (Saying Grace, 1951).
  • In the film Empire of the Sun, a young boy (played by Christian Bale), is put to bed by his loving parents in a scene also inspired by a Rockwell painting — a reproduction of which is later kept by the young boy during his captivity in a prison camp. (Freedom from Fear, 1943).
  • The Freedom from Fear painting is also visually referenced (in parody fashion) in the 1986 film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and to a lesser degree in the 2006 film Hoot.
  • The 1994 film Forrest Gump includes a shot in a school that re-creates Rockwell's "Girl With a Black Eye" with young Forrest in place of the girl. Much of the film drew heavy visual inspiration from Rockwell's art.
  • In the film Lilo and Stitch, the end credits include a parody of Rockwell's Thanksgiving illustration. The participants in the dinner include three aliens, a native Hawaiian woman and child, and an African-American man.
  • The 1988 film Funny Farm featured a scheme concocted by a homeowner (played by Chevy Chase) where redneck townsfolk are bribed to act like the characters of Norman Rockwell's paintings to create the illusion of ideal small-town American life, making the area more appealing to prospective buyers.
  • In the 2002 film Spider-Man, the scene when Aunt May (Rosemary Harris) puts the Thanksgiving turkey in front of Norman Osborn (Willem Dafoe) refers to a Rockwell painting. (Freedom from Want, 1943).
  • In the film The Polar Express, appears one of the Rockwells' Saturday Evening Post covers, The Discovery (Boy Discovering Santa Suit)

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Hoot is a 2006 film based on Carl Hiassens novel of the same name. ... This article is about witnesses in law courts. ... The Amish (Amisch or Amische) (IPA: ) are an Anabaptist Christian denomination in the United States and Canada (Ontario and Manitoba) that are known for their plain dress and limited use of modern conveniences such as automobiles and electricity. ... Kelly McGillis (born July 9, 1957 in Newport Beach, California, USA) is an American actress, whose notable movies include Witness (for which she received a Golden Globe nomination), Top Gun and The Accused. ... Lukas Haas (born Lucas D. Haas on April 16, 1976) is an American actor. ... Empire of the Sun is a 1987 film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Christian Bale, John Malkovich, and Miranda Richardson. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is an English [2] actor who is known for his roles in the films American Psycho, Batman Begins and The Prestige, among others. ... Ferris Buellers Day Off is a 1986 comedy film written and directed by John Hughes. ... Hoot is a 2006 film based on Carl Hiassens novel of the same name. ... Forrest Gump is an Academy Award winning 1994 film based on a novel by Winston Groom, and the name of the title character of both. ... Lilo & Stitch is an animated film, set in Hawaii. ... The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... Funny farm is a slang term for a psychiatric hospital. ... Chevy Chase (born Cornelius Crane Chase on October 8, 1943) is an Emmy Award-winning American comedian, writer, and television and film actor. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Rosemary Harris (born September 19, 1930[1] in Ashby, Suffolk, England) is an Academy Award nominated English actress and a member of the American Theatre Hall of Fame. ... William Dafoe, Jr. ... The Polar Express is a 1985 childrens book (ISBN 0-86264-143-8) written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg, a former professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. ... There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ...

Trivia

American comedian Christopher Titus named his stand-up routine "Norman Rockwell is Bleeding," which revolved around his dysfunctional family. He chose this title because of Rockwell's focus on American life, and that since a high percentage of American families are considered dysfunctional (63% according to Christopher Titus) he assumes that Rockwell would be suffering in some way.


Gallery

Major works

  • Scout at Ship's Wheel (1913) [1]
  • Santa and Scouts in Snow (1913) [2]
  • Boy and Baby Carriage (1916) [3]
  • Circus Barker and Strongman (1916) [4]
  • Gramps at the Plate (1916) [5]
  • Redhead Loves Hatty Perkins (1916) [6]
  • People in a Theatre Balcony (1916) [7]
  • Cousin Reginald Goes to the Country (1917) [8]
  • Santa and Expense Book (1920) [9]
  • Mother Tucking Children into Bed (1921) [10]
  • No Swimming (1921) [11]
  • Santa with Elves (1922) [12]
  • The Four Freedoms (1943) [13]
  • Freedom of Speech (1943) [14]
  • Freedom to Worship (1943) [15]
  • Freedom from Want (1943) [16]
  • Freedom from Fear (1943) [17]
  • Rosie the Riveter (1943) [18]
  • Going and Coming (1947)
  • Bottom of the Sixth (1949) [19]
  • Saying Grace (1951)
  • Girl at Mirror (1954)
  • Breaking Home Ties (1954) [20]
  • The Marriage License (1955)
  • The Scoutmaster (1956)[21]
  • Triple Self-Portrait (1960) [22]
  • Golden Rule (1961)
  • The Problem We All Live With (1964) [23]
  • Southern Justice (Murder in Mississippi) (1965) [24]
  • New Kids in the Neighborhood (1967)
  • The Rookie

Breaking Home Ties was painted by Norman Rockwell for the September 25, 1954 cover of The Saturday Evening Post. ...

See also

Scouting Portal

Image File history File links Scout_logo2. ... The Norman Rockwell Museum is home to the worlds largest collection of original Rockwell art. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903 The Saturday Evening Post was a weekly magazine published in the United States from August 4, 1821 to February 8, 1969. ... Freedom of Speech Freedom of Worship. “Freedom From Fear” The Four Freedoms are goals famously articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the State of the Union Address he delivered to the 77th United States Congress on January 6, 1941. ... The National Museum of American Illustration (NMAI) is the first museum in the world to be devoted exclusively to American Illustration artwork. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Norman Rockwell
Persondata
NAME Norman Rockwell
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Painter
DATE OF BIRTH February 3, 1894
PLACE OF BIRTH New York City
DATE OF DEATH November 8, 1978
PLACE OF DEATH Stockbridge, Massachusetts

  Results from FactBites:
 
Norman Rockwell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1551 words)
Rockwell transferred from high school to the Chase Art School at the age of 16.
Rockwell is a recipient of the Silver Buffalo Award, the highest adult award given by the Boy Scouts of America.
Norman Rockwell died November 8, 1978 of emphysema at age 84 in Stockbridge, Massachusetts
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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