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Encyclopedia > Norman Mailer
Norman Mailer

Born January 31, 1923(1923-01-31)
Long Branch, New Jersey
Died November 10, 2007 (aged 84)
New York City, New York
Occupation Novelist
Nationality American
Genres Fiction
Debut works The Naked and the Dead

Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... // The following is a list of notable deaths in 2007. ... Norman Mailer photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Sept. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County Long Branch is a City in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... The Naked and the Dead is a 1948 novel, the first written by Norman Mailer. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ...


Along with Truman Capote, Joan Didion, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer is considered an innovator of creative nonfiction, a genre sometimes called New Journalism, but which covers the essay to the nonfiction novel. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize twice and the National Book Award once. In 1955, Mailer, together with Ed Fancher and Dan Wolf, first published The Village Voice, which began as an arts- and politics-oriented weekly newspaper initially distributed in Greenwich Village. In 2005, he won the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from The National Book Foundation. Truman Capote (pronounced ) (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. ... Tom Wolfe gives a speech at the White House. ... Creative nonfiction, also known as literary journalism and narrative journalism, is a type of writing which uses literary skills in the writing of nonfiction. ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... The nonfiction novel is a literary genre, formally established in 1965 with Truman Capotes publication of In Cold Blood. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... The National Book Foundation, founded 1988, is a non-profit American literary foundation established to raise the cultural appreciation of great writing in America. ...

Contents

Biography

Norman Mailer (born Norman Kingsley) was born to a well-known Jewish family in Long Branch, New Jersey. His father, Isaac Barnett, was a South Africa-born accountant, and his mother, Fanny Schneider, ran a housekeeping and nursing agency. Mailer's sister, Barbara, was born in 1927.[1] He was brought up in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Boys' High School and entered Harvard University in 1939, where he studied aeronautical engineering. At Harvard, he became interested in writing and published his first story at the age of 18. After graduating in 1943, he was drafted into the U.S. Army. In World War II, he served in the Philippines with 112th Cavalry. He was not involved in much combat and completed his service as a cook, [1] but the experience provided enough material for The Naked and the Dead. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County Long Branch is a City in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Harvard redirects here. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering concerning aircraft, spacecraft and related topics. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Selective Service System is the means by which the United States administers military conscription. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Naked and the Dead is a 1948 novel, the first written by Norman Mailer. ...


Literary career

Novels

In 1948, before continuing his studies at the Sorbonne in Paris, Mailer published The Naked and the Dead, based on his military service in World War II. It was hailed by many as one of the best American wartime novels and named one of the "one hundred best novels in English language" by the Modern Library. Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Naked and the Dead is a 1948 novel, the first written by Norman Mailer. ... In 1998 the Modern Library created a list of what are, in their opinion, the 100 best novels published since 1900. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Barbary Shore (1951) was a surreal parable of Cold War left politics set in a Brooklyn rooming-house. His 1955 novel The Deer Park drew on his experiences working as a screenwriter in Hollywood in the early 1950s. It was initially rejected by six publishers due to its sexual content. Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Essays

In the mid-1950s, Mailer became increasingly known for his counter-culture essays. In 1955, he was one of the founders of The Village Voice.[2] In Advertisements for Myself (1959), Mailer's essay [3] (1957), examined violence, hysteria, sex, crime and confusion in American society, in fiction and journalism. He wrote numerous book reviews and essays for The New York Review of Books and Dissent Magazine. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the literary magazine. ... Dissent Magazine is a left-wing magazine that was started in 1954 by Irving Howe and Lewis Coser. ...


Other

Other works include: The Presidential Papers (1963), An American Dream (1965), Why Are We in Vietnam? (1967), Armies of the Night (1968, awarded a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award), Miami and the Siege of Chicago (1968), Of a Fire on the Moon (1970), The Prisoner of Sex (1971), Marilyn (1973), The Fight (1975), The Executioner's Song (1979, awarded a Pulitzer Prize), Ancient Evenings (1983), Harlot's Ghost (1991), Oswald's Tale (1995), The Gospel According to the Son (1997) and The Castle in the Forest (2007). For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... An American Dream is a novel by American writer Norman Mailer. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Armies of the Night book cover Armies of the Night is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning non-fiction novel written by Norman Mailer and sub-titled History as a Novel/The Novel as History The book deals ostensibly with the October 1967 anti-Vietnam War March on... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction has been awarded since 1962 for a distinguished book of non-fiction by an American author that is not eligible for consideration in any other category. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Of a Fire on the Moon (ISBN 0316544116) a work of fiction by Norman Mailer, first published in 1970 by Little Brown & Co, available in paperback and hardcover. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Executioners Song book cover The Executioners Song is a 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Norman Mailer that depicts the events surrounding the execution of Gary Gilmore by the state of Utah for murder. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Harlots Ghost (1991), a fictional 1300-page chronicle of the CIA by Norman Mailer, was considered by the author to be one of his best novels. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Oswalds Tale is a 1995 novel by Norman Mailer, ISBN 0679425357. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Castle in the Forest is the new book by writer Norman Mailer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


In 1968, he received a George Polk Award for his reporting in Harper's magazine. The George Polk Awards is an American journalism award. ...


In addition to his experimental fiction and nonfiction novels, Mailer produced a play version of The Deer Park (staged at the Theatre De Lys in Greenwich Village in 1967[4]), and in the late 1960s directed a number of improvisational avant-garde films in a Warhol style, including Maidstone (1970), which includes a brutal brawl between Norman T. Kingsley, played by himself, and Rip Torn that may or may not have been planned. In 1987, he adapted and directed a film version of his novel Tough Guys Don't Dance, starring Ryan O'Neal, which has become a minor camp classic. The nonfiction novel is a literary genre, formally established in 1965 with Truman Capotes publication of In Cold Blood. ... Lucille Lortel Theatre is an off-Broadway playhouse located at 121 Christopher Street in New York Citys Greenwich Village. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Maidstone was a film made in 1970; directed, written by by and starring Norman Mailer. ... Maidstone was a film made in 1970, directed by, written by, and starring Norman Mailer. ... Rip Torn (born February 6, 1931) is an American Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning television and film actor, who is perhaps best known for his role as Artie on the HBO comedy series The Larry Sanders Show. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ...


Activism

A number of Mailer's nonfiction works, such as The Armies of the Night and The Presidential Papers, are political. He covered the Republican and Democratic National Conventions in 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1992, and 1996. In 1967, he was arrested for his involvement in anti-Vietnam War demonstrations. Two years later, he ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic Party primary for Mayor of New York City, allied with columnist Jimmy Breslin (who ran for City Council President), proposing New York City secession and creating a 51st state. Armies of the Night book cover Armies of the Night is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning non-fiction novel written by Norman Mailer and sub-titled History as a Novel/The Novel as History The book deals ostensibly with the October 1967 anti-Vietnam War March on... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Jimmy Breslin (born October 17, 1930) is an American columnist and author who has written numerous novels and appeared regularly in various newspapers in New York City, where he lives. ... Fernando Wood: New York City secession, the secession of New York City (and possibly neighboring areas) from New York State and/or the United States, has been proposed several times in history. ... A U.S. 51 star flag has been designed in case of a 51st state actually joining the United States. ...


In 1980, Mailer spearheaded convicted killer Jack Abbott's successful bid for parole. In 1977, Abbott had read about Mailer's work on The Executioner's Song and wrote to Mailer, offering to enlighten the author about Abbott's time behind bars and the conditions he was experiencing. Mailer, impressed, helped to publish In the Belly of the Beast, a book on life in the prison system consisting of Abbott's letters to Mailer. Once paroled, Abbott committed a murder in New York City six weeks after his release, stabbing to death 22-year-old Richard Adan. Consequently, Mailer was subject to criticism for his role; in a 1992 interview, in the Buffalo News, he conceded that his involvement was "another episode in my life in which I can find nothing to cheer about or nothing to take pride in."[citation needed] Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... For the fictional character on the soap opera The Young and the Restless, see Jack Abbott (Y&R). ... It has been suggested that Medical parole be merged into this article or section. ... The Executioners Song book cover The Executioners Song is a 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Norman Mailer that depicts the events surrounding the execution of Gary Gilmore by the state of Utah for murder. ... The Buffalo News is the primary newspaper of the Buffalo, New York metropolitan area and its surrounding suburbs. ...


In 1989, Mailer joined with a number of other prominent authors in publicly expressing support for colleague Salman Rushdie in the wake of the fatwa, or death sentence, issued against Rushdie by Iran's Islamic government for his having authored The Satanic Verses.[citation needed] Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Ahmed Salman Rushdie (Devanagari : अख़्मद सल्मान रश्दी Nastaliq:; born 19 June 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... A fatwā (Arabic: ; plural fatāwā Arabic: ), is a considered opinion in Islam made by a mufti, a scholar capable of issuing judgments on Sharia (Islamic law). ... For the verses known as Satanic Verses, see Satanic Verses. ...


Biographies

His biographical subjects have included Pablo Picasso and Lee Harvey Oswald. His 1986 off-Broadway play Strawhead starring his daughter, Kate, was about Marilyn Monroe. His 1973 biography of Monroe was particularly controversial: in its final chapter he stated that she was murdered by agents of the FBI and CIA who resented her supposed affair with Robert F. Kennedy. He later admitted that these speculations were "not good journalism."[citation needed] Picasso redirects here. ... Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to two United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning American actress, model and sex symbol. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ...


Personal life

Mailer was married six times, and had several mistresses. He had eight biological children by his various wives, and adopted one further child. For many years, he had a house on the Cape Cod oceanfront in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Like many novelists of his generation, Mailer struggled with alcohol and drug abuse throughout his life. [5]

  • He was married first in 1944, to Beatrice Silverman, whom he divorced in 1952.
  • Mailer married his second wife, Adele Morales, in 1954. In 1960, Mailer stabbed her with a penknife at a party. While Morales made a full physical recovery, in 1997 she published a memoir of their marriage entitled The Last Party, which outlined her perception of the incident. This incident has been a focal point for feminist critics of Mailer, who point to themes of sexual violence in his work.
  • His third wife, whom he married in 1962, and divorced in 1963, was the British heiress and journalist Lady Jeanne Campbell (1929-2007), the only daughter of the 11th Duke of Argyll and a granddaughter of the press baron Lord Beaverbrook; by her, he had a daughter, Kate Mailer, who is an actress.
  • His fourth marriage, in 1963, was to Beverly Bentley, a former model turned actress. She was the mother of his producer son Michael and his actor son Stephen.
  • His fifth wife was Carol Stevens, whom he married in 1980, with whom he had a daughter Maggie Alexander, born in 1971. They separated one day after their wedding, and later divorced.
  • His sixth and last wife, married in 1980, was Norris Church (née Barbara Davis), a former model turned writer. They had one son together, John Buffalo Mailer, and Mailer informally adopted Matthew Norris, her son by her first husband, Larry Norris.

He appeared in an episode of Gilmore Girls entitled "Norman Mailer, I'm Pregnant!" with his son Stephen Mailer. Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adele Morales is the second wife of American author-playwright Norman Mailer. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Last Party is a 1997 book by Adele Morales, second wife of Norman Mailer, whom she married in 1954. ... Lady Jeanne Louise Campbell (December 10, 1928 - June 9, 2007) was a British socialite and foreign correspondent who wrote for the Evening Standard in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Arms of the Duke of Argyll since 1406 The title Duke of Argyll was created in the peerage of Scotland in 1701 and in the peerage of the United Kingdom in 1892. ... Sir William Maxwell Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (May 25, 1879 - June 9, 1964) was a Canadian–British business tycoon and politician. ... Kate Mailer is an American stage and film actress who is the daughter of American author-playwright Norman Mailer. ... Michael Mailer (born 1964) is a film producer and the oldest son of writer Norman Mailer. ... John Buffalo Mailer (born April 16, 1978) is an author, playwright and journalist. ... Gilmore Girls was long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... Stephen Mailer (born March 10, 1966) is an American stage and screen actor. ...


In 2005, he co-wrote a book with his youngest child, John Buffalo Mailer, titled The Big Empty. In 2007 Random House published his last novel, The Castle in the Forest. John Buffalo Mailer (born April 16, 1978) is an author, playwright and journalist. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...


Death

Mailer died of acute renal failure on the morning of November 10, 2007, a month after undergoing lung surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, New York.[6] He was 84 years old. is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Mount Sinai Hospital is a hospital in New York City, New York, serving Manhattans Upper East Side and Harlem. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Further reading

  • Norman Mailer, by Michael K. Glenday. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.
  • Radical Fictions and the Novels of Norman Mailer, by Nigel Leigh. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1990.
  • Critical Essays on Norman Mailer, edited by J.Michael Lennon: Boston, G.K.Hall and Co., 1986.
  • Norman Mailer, by Richard Poirier, New York: Viking,1972. One of the best studies of Mailer's writing, tracking his career through the early Eighties.
  • Norman Mailer, by Richard Jackson Foster, University of Minnesota Press, 1968.
  • The Structured Vision of Norman Mailer, by Barry H. Leeds, New York University Press,1969.
  • Norman Mailer, by Robert Merrill, Twayne, 1978.
  • Mailer: His Life and Times, edited by Peter Manso, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985. Highly readable "oral" biography of Mailer created by cross-cutting interviews with friends, enemies, acquaintances, relatives, wives of Mailer and Mailer himself.
  • Conversations with Norman Mailer, edited by J. Michael Lennon. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 1988.
  • The Portable Beat Reader, edited by Ann Charters, Penguin Books. New York. 1992. ISBN 0-670-83885-3 (hc); ISBN 0-14-015102-8 (pbk).

Quotations from Mailer

  • "I take it for granted that there's a side of me that loves public action, and there's another side of me that really wants to be alone and work and write. And I've learned to alternate the two as matters develop."
  • "There are two kinds of brave men: those who are brave by the grace of nature, and those who are brave by an act of will."

Quotations about Mailer

  • "This is Norman Mailer. He donated his ego to the Harvard Medical School" Woody Allen in the film Sleeper.

eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Sleeper has a number of different meanings, usually connected to sleep in varying degrees of literalness: Sleeper is a Woody Allen movie. ...

Selected bibliography

Fiction

  • The Naked and the Dead. New York: Rinehart, 1948.
  • Barbary Shore. New York: Rinehart, 1951.
  • The Deer Park. New York: Putnam's, 1955.
  • An American Dream. New York: Dial, 1965.
  • The Deer Park: A Play. New York: Dial, 1967.
  • The Short Fiction of Norman Mailer. New York: Dell, 1967.
  • Why Are We in Vietnam? New York: Putnam's, 1967.
  • The Executioner's Song. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1979.
  • Of Women and Their Elegance. New York, Simon and Schuster, 1980
  • Ancient Evenings. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.
  • Tough Guys Don't Dance. New York: Random House, 1984.
  • Harlot's Ghost. New York: Random House, 1991.
  • The Gospel According to the Son. New York: Random House, 1997.
  • The Castle in the Forest. New York: Random House, 2007.

The Naked and the Dead is a 1948 novel, the first written by Norman Mailer. ... An American Dream is a novel by American writer Norman Mailer. ... The Executioners Song book cover The Executioners Song is a 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Norman Mailer that depicts the events surrounding the execution of Gary Gilmore by the state of Utah for murder. ... Ancient Evenings is a novel by Norman Mailer. ... Tough Guys Dont Dance is the third album from the Welsh drum and bass producer High Contrast, to be released October 1st 2007 on the Hospital Records label. ... Harlots Ghost (1991), a fictional 1300-page chronicle of the CIA by Norman Mailer, was considered by the author to be one of his best novels. ... The Castle in the Forest is the new book by writer Norman Mailer. ...

Non-fiction

  • The White Negro. San Francisco: City Lights, 1957.
  • Advertisements for Myself. New York: Putnam's, 1959.
  • The Presidential Papers.New York: Putnam, 1963.
  • Cannibals and Christians. New York: Dial, 1966.
  • The Armies of the Night. New York: New American Library, 1968.
  • Miami and the Siege of Chicago: An Informal History of the Republican and Democratic Conventions of 1968. New York: New American Library, 1968.
  • Of a Fire on the Moon. Boston: Little, Brown, 1969.
  • The Prisoner of Sex. Boston: Little, Brown, 1971.
  • St. George and The Godfather. New York: Signet Classics, 1972.
  • Marilyn: a Biography. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1973.
  • The Faith of Graffiti. New York: Praeger, 1974.
  • The Fight. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1975.
  • Pieces and Pontifications. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1982.
  • Portrait of Picasso as a Young Man: An Interpretative Biography. Atlantic Monthly Press, 1995.
  • Oswald's Tale:An American Mystery. New York: Random House, 1996.
  • Why Are We At War?. New York: Random House, 2003.
  • The Spooky Art: Some Thoughts on Writing. New York: Random House, 2003.
  • The Big Empty: Dialogues on Politics, Sex, God, Boxing, Morality, Myth, Poker and Bad Conscience in America. New York: Nation Books, 2006

The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster is an essay by Norman Mailer recording the wave of young white people in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s who were so enamored of jazz and swing music that they adopted the black culture as their own. ... Armies of the Night book cover Armies of the Night is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning non-fiction novel written by Norman Mailer and sub-titled History as a Novel/The Novel as History The book deals ostensibly with the October 1967 anti-Vietnam War March on... Of a Fire on the Moon (ISBN 0316544116) a work of fiction by Norman Mailer, first published in 1970 by Little Brown & Co, available in paperback and hardcover. ... A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... Oswalds Tale is a 1995 novel by Norman Mailer, ISBN 0679425357. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Norman Mailer, Towering Writer With Matching Ego, Dies at 84. New York Times. 11.10.2007
  2. ^ Villagevoice.com
  3. ^ "The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster" Dissentmagazine.org
  4. ^ Curtain Times: The New York Theater 1965-1987 by Otis L. Guernsey Jr., Applause 1987 - play review page 78.
  5. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1316/is_n3_v24/ai_12088267
  6. ^ BBC Author Norman Mailer dies at 84 10 November 2007

is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Obituaries

  • "Full-blooded pugilist": the TLS on the late Norman Mailer
  • NY Times Norman Mailer, Towering Writer With Matching Ego, Is Dead
  • Yahoo News [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Author Norman Mailer dies at 84 - USATODAY.com (1894 words)
Norman Mailer, one of the last surviving literary lions to roar out of World War II, died Saturday morning.
Mailer believed in the supremacy of fiction over fact, but he wrote some of his best work as the "New Journalism" movement emerged in the mid-1960s.
Mailer was short and handsomely craggy, with a bulldog chest.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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