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Encyclopedia > Nori
Nori
Nori

Nori (Japanese: 海苔) (Chinese: 海苔; pinyin: hǎitāi, Korean: , kim or gim) is the Japanese name for various edible seaweed species of the red alga Porphyra including most notably P. yezoensis and P. tenera. The term nori is also commonly used to refer to the food products created from these so-called "sea vegetables". Finished products are made by a shredding and rack-drying process that resembles papermaking. Japan, Korea, and China are the current major producers of nori, with total production valued at up to US $2 billion per year. Nori is a kind of seaweed. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x812, 380 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nori Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x812, 380 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nori Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... In biology, a species is a kind of organism. ... Possible classes Florideophyceae Bangiophyceae Cyanidiophyceae Red algae (Rhodophyta, pronounced /ˈrəʊdÉ™(ÊŠ)ËŒfʌɪtÉ™/) are a large group of mostly multicellular, marine algae, including many notable seaweeds. ... Porphyra is a genus of red algae. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... The Diamond Sutra of the Chinese Tang Dynasty, the oldest dated printed book in the world, found at Dunhuang, from 868 AD. Papermaking is the process of making paper, a material which is ubiquitous today for writing and packaging. ...

Contents

History

Originally, the term nori was more generic and referred to various kinds of seaweeds including Hijiki. One of the oldest descriptions about nori is dated back to around the 8th century. In the Taihō Code (大宝律令) enacted in 701, nori was already included in the form of taxation. In Utsubo Story (宇津保物語) written around 987, nori was recognized as a common food. The original nori was formed as a paste, and the nori sheet was invented in Asakusa, Edo (contemporary Tokyo), in the Edo period by the method of Japanese papers. The word nori in Japanese has the same pronunciation as nori (, "glue"), and it is presumed that these plants were also used to glue objects. Hijiki or hiziki (Japanese: 鹿尾菜 or 羊栖菜) (Sargassaceae), is a type of edible seaweed commonly found on rocky coastlines. ... The Taihō Code or Code of Taihō ) was an administrative reorganization enacted in 702 in Japan, at the end of the Asuka period. ... Sensoji Temple The Kaminarimon is the outer gate of the Sensoji, Asakusas famous temple. ... Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... The Sugiharagami (杉原紙), a kind of Washi Washi (和紙) or Wagami is a type of paper made in Japan. ...


Production

Production and processing of nori by current methods is a highly advanced form of agriculture. The biology of Porphyra, although complicated, is well understood, and this knowledge is used to control virtually every step of the production process. Farming takes place in the sea where the Porphyra plants grow attached to nets suspended at the sea surface and where the farmers operate from boats. The plants grow rapidly, requiring about 45 days from "seeding" until the first harvest. Multiple harvests can be taken from a single seeding, typically at about ten-day intervals. Harvesting is accomplished using mechanical harvesters of a variety of configurations. Processing of raw product is mostly accomplished by highly automated machines that accurately duplicate traditional manual processing steps, but with much improved efficiency and consistency. The final product is a paper-thin, dark, black, dried sheet of approximately 18×20 cm and 3 grams in weight.


There are several grades of nori available in the United States. The most common, and least expensive, grades are imported from China, costing about six cents per sheet. At the high end, ranging up to ninety cents per sheet, are "delicate shin-nori (nori from the first of the year's several harvests) cultivated in Ariake Bay, off the island of Kyushu in Japan." [1]http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/09/dining/09nori.html


In Japan, over 600 square kilometres (230 sq. mi.) of Japanese coastal waters are given to producing 350,000 tonnes (344,470 tons), worth over a billion dollars. China produces about a third of this. [2]


Use

Nori is commonly used as a wrap for sushi and onigiri. It is also a common garnish or flavoring in noodle preparations and soups. Nori is most typically toasted prior to consumption ("yaki-nori" in Japanese). A very common and popular secondary product is toasted and flavored nori ("ajitsuke-nori" in Japanese), in which a flavoring mixture (variable, but typically soy sauce, spices and sugar in the Japanese style or sesame oil and salt in the Korean style) is applied in combination with the toasting process. Nori is also eaten by making it into a soy sauce flavored paste noritsukudani (海苔佃煮). This article is about Japanese cuisine. ... Onigiri Onigiri (お握り) also known as Omusubi (おむすび) is a Japanese (short grain) rice ball snack most commonly formed into triangle or oval shapes and wrapped in seaweed (nori). ...


A related product, prepared from the unrelated green algae Monostroma and Enteromorpha, is called aonori ({{lang|ja|青海苔}.} literally "blue nori") and is used like herbs on everyday meals like okonomiyaki and yakisoba. Aonori (Japanese: 青海苔) or green laver is a type of edible green seaweed, including species from the genera Monostroma and Enteromorpha of Ulvaceae. ... For other uses, see Herb (disambiguation). ... A man prepares okonomiyaki at in a restaurant in Hiroshima, Japan Cheese (above) and shrimp okonomiyaki fully seasoned with sauce, mayonnaise, katsuobushi and aonori in Osaka, Japan Lantern beckons the unwary tourist into an okonomiyaki restaurant Okonomiyaki ) is a pan-fried Japanese dish cooked with various ingredients. ... Yakisoba ), literally fried noodles, is a dish often sold at festivals in Japan. ...


See also

  • Laver (seaweed) - similar style common around the west coast of Great Britain and Ireland.
  • Gim (Korean food)

Laver is an edible seaweed that has high content of mineral salts, particularly iodine and iron. ...

External links

  • Suria Link Seaplants Handbook
  • http://sushi.pro/ingredients/nori.html

References

  1. ^ Nori Steps Away From the Sushi - New York Times
  2. ^ Thiomas, D. 2002 Seaweeds. The Natural History Museum, London. ISBN 0 565 09175 1

  Results from FactBites:
 
Urban Dictionary: nori (271 words)
Nori is tasty, but some people can't stand the smell.
Nori can do no wrong, and is perfect in everyway.
Also Nori tends to be a demon in the sack, seeing as how his name is "Iron" backwards, I won't say what part of his body is iron, but it should be self explanatory.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Nori (568 words)
Nori (海苔), (김, kim or gim), is the Japanese name for various edible seaweed species of the red alga Porphyra including most notably P.
The original nori was formed as a paste, and the nori sheet was invented in Asakusa, Edo (former Tokyo) in Edo period by the method of Japanese papers.
Nori is commonly used as a wrap for sushi and onigiri.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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