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Encyclopedia > Noon

Noon is the time exactly halfway through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 noon in the 12-hour clock. Midday is also used as a synonym for noon, although this may also be a more general term to mean around noon, or very early afternoon. Water, Rabbit, and Deer: three of the 20 day symbols in the Aztec calendar, from the Aztec Sun Stone. ... The 24-hour clock is a convention of time-keeping in which the day runs from midnight to midnight and is divided into 24 hours, numbered from 0 to 23. ... The 12-hour clock is a timekeeping convention in which the 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called ante meridiem (a. ... Look up Synonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Afternoon is the time of day after 12:00 (noon), and follows morning each day. ...

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Confusion between a.m. and p.m. when referring to noon and midnight

Note that the common practice used in most digital clocks, of using 12 p.m. to signify noon (along with 12 a.m . for midnight) can be confusing. The confusion comes from 12 a.m. seeming to be the next hour in the 10 a.m., 11 a.m. series, but 12.01 p.m. being just after noon. In addition, p.m. is often associated with night so 12 p.m. may read as midnight. The 12-hour clock is a timekeeping convention in which the 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called ante meridiem (a. ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ...


Etymologically speaking, a.m. means before noon (antemeridiem) and p.m. means after noon (postmeridiem) and so neither midday nor midnight are correctly referred to using a.m. or p.m.. Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ...


Solar noon

Solar noon is when the sun appears the highest in the sky (nearest zenith), compared to its positions during the rest of the day. It occurs when the Sun is transitting the celestial meridian. This is also the origin of the terms ante meridiem and post meridiem as noted above. At solar noon, the sun is due south in the Northern Hemisphere, and due north in the Southern Hemisphere. (Actually, this is not strictly true, but the maximum difference between noon and sun due-south is a mere 16 seconds of time at 45 degrees North latitude, and 3 minutes at 85oN.) The Sun is directly overhead at solar noon at the equator on the equinoxes; at Tropic of Cancer (latitude 23½°N) on the summer solstice in June; and at Tropic of Capricorn (23½°S) on the winter solstice in December. Due to the effects of the use of standard time, daylight saving time, and the equation of time, clock noon and solar noon hardly ever coincide. The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System. ... In broad terms, the zenith is the direction pointing directly above a particular location (perpendicular, orthogonal). ... Deimos transits the Sun, as seen by Mars Rover Opportunity on March 4, 2004 The word transit has two meanings in astronomy: A transit is the astronomical event that occurs when one celestial body appears to move across the face of another celestial body, as seen by an observer at... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ... This article is about the astronomical concept. ... The 12-hour clock is a timekeeping convention in which the 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called ante meridiem (AM, Latin for before noon) and post meridiem (PM, Latin for after noon). Each period consists of 12 hours numbered 12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5... The 12-hour clock is a timekeeping convention in which the 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called ante meridiem (AM, Latin for before noon) and post meridiem (PM, Latin for after noon). Each period consists of 12 hours numbered 12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5... The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... The Southern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is south of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On Earth it contains five continents (Antarctica, Australia, most of South America, parts of Africa and Asia) as well as four oceans (South... World map showing the equator in red For other uses, see Equator (disambiguation). ... Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ... World map showing the Tropic of Cancer The Tropic of Cancer (cancer is Latin for crab), or Northern tropic is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... A solstice is either of the two events of the year when the sun is at its greatest distance from the equatorial plane. ... World map showing the Tropic of Capricorn The Tropic of Capricorn or Southern tropic is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ... Universal Time (UT) is a timescale based on the rotation of the Earth. ...  DST used  DST no longer used  DST never used Daylight saving time (DST), or summer time in British English, is the convention of advancing clocks so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. ... During the course of the year, the time as read from a sundial can run ahead of clock time by as much as 16 min 33 s (around October 31–November 1) or fall behind by as much as 14 min 6 s (around February 11–12). ...


The opposite of noon is midnight. Look up Antonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ...


Etymology

The word "noon" is derived from Latin nona hora, the ninth hour of the day. As the Roman day started on 6.00 a.m., at sunrise, the first hour would have been from 6.00 till 7.00 a.m and the ninth hour from 2.00 till 3.00 p.m. These hours were important in monasteries, as different prayers were held on them.


The English word "noon" originally applied at 2.00 p.m., but by 1100 AD the meaning had shifted to "midday". (see: [1])


Cultural meanings

In traditional magical thinking, both noon and its opposite, midnight, form an axis linking the mundane world with otherworlds by being apogee of light and darkness, respectively. Thus, noon is associated with heaven, order and life. In the history of religion, Magical thinking is a kind of non-scientific causal reasoning. ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ... For Irish Mythology, see Other World. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation), Lives (disambiguation) or Living (disambiguation), Living Things (disambiguation). ...


Touching the sacrum

Central points of day and night were seen as moments when sacrum manifests itself and epiphanies were most likely. Thus, a noon prayer, healing practice and ritual magic were thought to be most effective - if their intentions were related to themes associated with day, of course. Also, numerous plants, animals, substances and other items harvested at noon were believed to have special, magical qualities and powers helpful in ritual practices. This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... This article is about a feeling, for other meanings see epiphany (disambiguation). ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... Healing is the process whereby the cells in the body regenerate and repair to reduce the size of a damaged or necrotic area. ... Ritual magic is the performance of a ritual for magical purposes. ...


Sun resting

As it seems, the Sun stops its voyage at noon, where it was thought to rest for a while. By standards of magical thinking this stillness is sacred, as Otherworlds themselves are still and static. It was thought that at noon, Otherworld pristine conditions were present, bringing the state of primordial chaos to the world. In various religions, sacred (from Latin, sacrum, sacrifice) or holy, objects, places or concepts are believed by followers to be intimately connected with the supernatural, or divinity, and are thus greatly revered. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


This resulted in the taboo of working at noon, as work is associated with culture and civilization and therefore anathema to nature and chaos. So, the act of working at noon is viewed as human will contradicting the natural (or God-given) order. As a result, in folklore there is widespread belief that working at noon is vain and even harmful. A taboo is a strong social prohibition (or ban) against words, objects, actions, discussions, or people that are considered undesirable by a group, culture, or society. ... Look up work in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Cities are a major hallmark of human civilization. ... Anathema (in Greek Ανάθεμα) meaning originally something lifted up as an offering to the gods; later, with evolving meanings, it came to mean: to be formally set apart, banished, exiled, excommunicated or denounced, sometimes accursed. ... Galunggung in 1982, showing a combination of natural events. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Folklore is the body of expressive culture, including tales, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, material culture, and so forth within a particular population comprising the traditions (including oral traditions) of that culture, subculture, or group. ...


Demons of noon

Persons breaking the taboo of working at noon were subject to chastisement by demons of noon. They are present in many mythologies, from Arabian and Hebrew mythology, where they were represented by dust devils, to Slavic mythology, where all sorts of wilas, and topielecs haunted the offending folk at noon such as the Pscipolnitsa. They universally caused hyperthermia resulting in aches, madness or drowning. In eremitic monastic tradition of Egypt, the demons of noon attacked the monks, who were at the nonn the prey of acedia (apathy, spiritual laziness). The demon Satan In folklore, mythology, and religion, a demon is a supernatural being that is generally described as an evil spirit, but is also depicted to be good in some instances. ... // For the Derek Sherinian album, see Mythology (Derek Sherinian album). ... Arabian mythology is the ancient beliefs of the Arabs. ... Jewish mythology is the body of mythology of the Jewish people and Judaism as understood by some people. ... A dust devil in the Mojave Desert. ... Slavic mythology and Slavic religion evolved over more than 3,000 years. ... Fairies in Slavic mythology come in several forms and their names are spelled differently based on the specific language. ... Topielec (plural Topielce) is a name applied to Slavic spirits of water. ... Pscipolnitsa or Południca (Polish) or Psezpolnica (Serbian) was a Slavic noon demon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A hermit (from the Greek erēmos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion and/or isolation from society. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—and the origin of its name A monk is a person who practices religious asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... Acedia is a Greek word, literally meaning caringfree. ...


Midday is more general than noon

In contrast to the precise meaning of 'noon', 'midday' has rather looser connotations. Midday is the period of early afternoon, beginning at noon and lasting until mid-afternoon.


See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

External link

  • Generate a solar noon calendar for your location

  Results from FactBites:
 
NOON: journal of the short poem (751 words)
It is not that the poems within Noon are merely spare, or that in general the poetic lines are short; overall, the single word or brief poetic phrase is the foreground subject, while the author becomes a nearly anonymous self‑presence.
Noon, taken as a whole is impressive; the journal really does flow from poem to poem; it can be further noted that the disappearance of discursiveness and “author” is neither absolute nor affected, as in some English haiku; rather there is an evident quiet, spacious dialogues with the reader, questioning and penetrating notions of form:
In Noon however, the foregrounding flow of elemental image, and particularly the manner in which the editor has separated poems from authors’ names (at the back), allows the reader to experience a unique poetic journey.
Jeff Noon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (386 words)
Jeff Noon (born in 1957 in Droylsden, England) is a novelist, short story writer and playwright whose works make extensive use of wordplay and fantasy.
Prior to his recent relocation (around the year 2000) to Brighton, Noon set most of his stories in some version of his native city of Manchester.
Noon describes Automated Alice as a "trequel" - it is a companion piece of sorts to the famous Lewis Carroll books, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass.
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