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Encyclopedia > Nonjuring schism

The Nonjuring schism was a split in the Anglican Church in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, over whether William of Orange could legally be recognized as King of England. The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ... The term Glorious Revolution refers to the generally popular overthrow of James II of England in 1688. ... William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was a Dutch Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11 April 1689, in each case until his...


Many of the Anglican clergy felt legally bound by their previous oaths of allegiance to James II, and though they could accept William as Regent, they could not accept him as King. It was not a split on matters of religious doctrine, but purely a political issue and a matter of conscience. The nonjurors thus supported Jacobitism, although they generally did not actively support the Jacobite rebellions in 1715 or 1745. James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ... Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of the... Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected...


Five of the Seven Bishops who had petitioned James against the Declaration of Indulgence nonetheless became nonjurors, along with four other bishops. The Seven Bishops were seven bishops of the Church of England. ... The Declaration of Indulgence (or the declaration for the liberty of conscience) was made by King James II of England, on the April 4, 1687. ...


The nine nonjuring bishops were:

These nine nonjuring bishops were joined by about 400 other Anglican clergy and a substantial majority of bishops in Scotland and one bishop in Ireland. In February 1690, six nonjuring bishops were deprived of their sees and deposed (three others, Thomas, Cartwright, and Lake had already died). In Scotland, the Episcopal church was disestablished and Presbyterianism reintroduced. William Sancroft (1616-1693), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Fressingfield in Suffolk on January 30, 1616, and entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in July 1634. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... Thomas Ken (1637 - March 19, 1711), the most eminent of the English non-juring bishops, and one of the fathers of modern English hymnology, was born at Little Berkhampstead, Herts. ... The Bishop of Bath and Wells is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Bath and Wells in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Bishop of Chichester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chichester in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Bishop of Ely is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Ely in the Province of Canterbury The diocese covers the county of Cambridgeshire (with the exception of the Soke of Peterborough) and has its see in the City of Ely, Cambridgeshire, where the seat is located... The Bishop of Peterborough is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Peterborough in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Bishop of Chester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chester in the Province of York. ... The Bishop of Gloucester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Gloucester in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Bishop of Norwich is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Norwich in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Bishop of Worcester controls the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ... Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ...


When the vacant sees were filled, some refused to recognize the new bishops, and the nonjurors appointed their own bishops. In 1694, George Hickes (Dean of Worcester) was consecrated nonjuring bishop of Thetford and Thomas Wagstaffe was consecrated nonjuring bishop of Ipswich. Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ...


Wagstaffe died in 1712 and Hickes remained the only surviving nonjuring bishop, however he himself consecrated several more. The nonjurors themselves split in 1719 over the issue of whether to introduce any modifications in the Book of Common Prayer; this rift was repaired in 1732. The nonjuring clergy and congregations gradually declined throughout the 18th century, as Jacobitism itself largely disappeared after the Second Jacobite rebellion of 1745, although some lines of succession of nonjuring bishops were maintained until the end of the century. Events Treaty of Aargau signed between Catholic and Protestants. ... Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) Births November 30 - Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, Princess of Wales (d. ... The Book of Common Prayer is the prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ... Events February 23 - First performance of Handels Orlando, in London June 9 - James Oglethorpe is granted a royal charter for the colony of Georgia. ... This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ... Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nonjuring schism - Wikipedia (341 words)
The Nonjuring schism was a split in the Anglican Church in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, over whether William of Orange could legally be recognized as King of England.
In 1694, George Hickes (Dean of Worcester) was consecrated nonjuring bishop of Thetford and Thomas Wagstaffe was consecrated nonjuring bishop of Ipswich.
The nonjuring clergy and congregations gradually declined throughout the 18th century, as Jacobitism itself largely disappeared after the Second Jacobite rebellion of 1745, although some lines of succession of nonjuring bishops were maintained until the end of the century.
Non-juror - Wikipedia (185 words)
In British history, the non-jurors were those who refused to swear allegiance to William and Mary in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution.
They included Anglican clergy who were deposed for their refusal, resulting in the Nonjuring schism; they also included a number of laypersons.
In regard to French history, non-jurors refer to those members of the Roman Catholic clergy during the French Revolution who refused to swear an oath of allegiance to the state under the Civil Constitution of the Clergy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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