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Encyclopedia > Nome King

The Nome King is an enduring enemy of the characters of L. Frank Baum's Oz books. Although the Wicked Witch of the West is the most famous of Oz's villains (thanks to the popular 1939 film The Wizard of Oz), the Nome King is the closest the book series has to a main antagonist. He appears again and again to cause trouble for the Land of Oz. Image File history File links Gnome_king_cover. ... Image File history File links Gnome_king_cover. ... Cover of The Gnome King of Oz (1927) is the 21st Oz book and the seventh by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. ... // Baums childhood and early life Frank was born in Chittenango, New York, into a family of German origin, the seventh of nine children born to Cynthia Stanton and Benjamin Ward Baum, only five of whom survived into adulthood. ... Oz has several meanings: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens story written by L. Frank Baum The Wizard of Oz is the title of various works derived from it. ... The Wicked Witch of the West, as portrayed by Margaret Hamilton in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz The Wicked Witch of the West (or simply The Wicked Witch) is a character in the fictional Land of Oz created by American author L. Frank Baum in his childrens... A typical cartoon villain. ... The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ...


The character called the Nome King is originally named Roquat the Red. Later he takes the name Ruggedo, which Baum first used in a stage adaptation. Even after Ruggedo loses his throne, he continues to think of himself as king, and the Oz book authors politely refer to him that way. Authors Ruth Plumly Thompson and John R. Neill used the traditional spelling "gnome," so Ruggedo is the title character in Thompson's The Gnome King of Oz. Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. ... John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 13, 1943) was a childrens book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baums, Ruth Plumly Thompsons, and three of his own. ... Cover of The Gnome King of Oz (1927) is the 21st Oz book and the seventh by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ...


In Baum's universe, the Nomes are immortal rock fairies who dwell underground. They hide jewels and precious metals in the earth, and resent the "upstairs people" who dig down for those valuables. Apparently as revenge, the Nome King enjoys keeping surface-dwellers as slaves—not for their labor but simply to have them.


In their first encounter with Roquat, in Ozma of Oz, Princess Ozma, Dorothy Gale, and a party from the Emerald City free the royal family of Ev from his enslavement and, for good measure, take away his magic belt. Roquat becomes so angry that he plots revenge in The Emerald City of Oz. He has his subjects dig a tunnel under the Deadly Desert while his general recruits a host of evil spirits to conquer Oz. Fortunately, at the moment of invasion Ruggedo tastes the Water of Oblivion and forgets everything, including his enmity and his name. The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... Princess Ozma Princess Ozma is a fictional character in the Land of Oz universe created by L. Frank Baum. ... ... The fictional city of Oz as portrayed in the 1939 movie The Emerald City is the fictional capital of the Land of Oz in L. Frank Baums Oz books, first described in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ... eV may stand for: electronvolt eingetragener Verein, i. ... The magic belt is an artifact mentioned in the Oz books, first introduced in Ozma of Oz. ... The Emerald City of Oz is the sixth of L. Frank Baums fourteen Land of Oz books. ...


Tik-Tok of Oz reintroduces the Nome King with his new name and old resentments. Using some personal magic, he has enslaved the Shaggy Man's brother, a miner from Colorado. Shaggy, with the help of Betsy Bobbin, the Oogaboo army, some of Dorothy's old friends, and Quox the dragon, conquer the Nome King again and force him into exile. (In Rinkitink in Oz the king of the Nomes is Kaliko, the original king's chamberlain; he behaves much like his former master, at least in this book.) Tik-Tok of Oz is the eighth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. ... Shaggy Man is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 8th 269,837 km² 451 km 612 km 0. ... Betsy Bobbin is a character in the Oz books by L. Frank Baum. ... Chinese dragon, colour engraving on wood, Japanese Chinese school, 19th Century A dragon is a mythological creature, typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile, with magical or spiritual qualities. ... The original 1916 book cover by John R. Neill, reproduced for a modern facsimile edition. ...


In The Magic of Oz, Ruggedo meets the young enchanter Kiki Aru and plans to destroy Oz again. He gets into the country without Ozma's knowledge, creating havoc. However, he again drinks of the Water of Oblivion, and to stop him ever going bad again Ozma settles him in the Emerald City. The Magic of Oz is the thirteenth and final Land of Oz book written entirely by L. Frank Baum. ... The fictional city of Oz as portrayed in the 1939 movie The Emerald City is the fictional capital of the Land of Oz in L. Frank Baums Oz books, first described in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. ...


Soon after taking over the Oz series, Ruth Plumly Thompson brought back Ruggedo, his memory and rancor restored. Finding a box of mixed magic, in Kabumpo in Oz he grows into a giant and runs away with Ozma's royal palace on his head. Later he returns to threaten the Emerald City in The Gnome King of Oz, Pirates in Oz, and Handy Mandy in Oz. The end of the last book finds him transformed into a cactus so that he can never make trouble again. However, since he has recovered from amnesia, exile, being struck dumb, and even being transformed into a jug, it is quite easy to imagine the Nome King coming back again. Cover of Kabumpo in Oz. ... Cover of The Gnome King of Oz (1927) is the 21st Oz book and the seventh by Ruth Plumly Thompson. ... Cover of Pirates in Oz. ... Cover of Handy Mandy in Oz. ...


The Nome King was portrayed on film by Nicol Williamson in 1985's Return to Oz which was based loosely on the books Ozma of Oz and The Marvelous Land of Oz. Hamilton, Scotland-born actor (on September 14, 1938), Nicol Williamson was described by British playwright John Osborne as the greatest actor since Marlon Brando. Nicol was born to a struggling working-class Scottish family, but managed to attend the Birmingham School of Speech & Drama. ... This article is about the year. ... DVD cover The 1985 film Return to Oz is a motion picture arguably created as an unofficial sequel to The Wizard of Oz. ... The original 1907 book cover by John R. Neill. ... Title page of The Marvelous Land of Oz. ...



Oz portal
The authors (Baum | Thompson | McGraw | Volkov) | The illustrators (Denslow | Neill)
The film adaptations (The Wizard of Oz | The Wiz | Return to Oz)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nome King - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (651 words)
The Nome King is an enduring enemy of the characters of L.
Although the Wicked Witch of the West is the most famous of Oz's villains (thanks to the popular 1939 film The Wizard of Oz), the Nome King is the closest the book series has to a main antagonist.
The Nome King was portrayed on film by Nicol Williamson in 1985's Return to Oz which was based loosely on the books Ozma of Oz and The Marvelous Land of Oz.
King Island (311 words)
King Island is located in the Bering Straits, approximately 40 miles due south of Cape Prince of Wales and the village of Wales.
King Island was located and named by Captain James Cook in 1778, although no mention is made in a history of the regions of any inhabitants on the island at that time.
Photography of King Island in the late Nineteenth Century indicated a settlement of walrus-skin dwelling lashed to the face of King Island's cliffs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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