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Encyclopedia > Nola
Comune di Nola
Coat of arms of Comune di Nola
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Campania
Province Naples (NA)
Mayor
Elevation m
Area 39 km²
Population
 - Total (as of Dec. 2004) 32,935
 - Density 839/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 40°56′N 14°32′E
Gentilic Nolani
Dialing code 081
Postal code 80035 and 80037
Frazioni Piazzolla, Polvica
Patron San Felice Martyr
 - Day November 15

Location of Nola in Italy
Website: http://www.comune.nola.na.it

Nola is a city of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines. It is served by the Circumvesuviana railway from Naples. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Campania is a region of Southern Italy, bordering on Lazio to the north-west, Molise to the north, Puglia to the north-east, Basilicata to the east, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... The province of Naples (Italian: Provincia di Napoli) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ethnonym. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_220px_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Nola may refer to: Nola, a city in Campania, Italy Nola (moth), the namesake genus of the moth family Nolidae The title of a piano composition by Felix Arndt A short-hand variation of New Orleans, Louisiana The debut album from sludge metal act Down. ... Campania is a region of Southern Italy, bordering on Lazio to the north-west, Molise to the north, Puglia to the north-east, Basilicata to the east, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... The province of Naples (Italian: Provincia di Napoli) is a province in the Campania region of Italy. ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... This is about the terrestrial mountain range. ... Circumvesuviana is a narrow-gauge railway connecting cities near Naples, Italy. ...

Contents

History

===Ancient history=== famous people from compania are... Nola in Bronze Age times was the site of a settlement that has yielded evidence of the destructive power of an eruption by Mount Vesuvius between 1700BC and 1600BC (the Avellino eruption) almost 2000 years before the eruption that buried Roman Pompei & Heculaneum. Excavations revealed extensive evidence of a small village abandoned quickly by its occupants at the time of the eruption so that a wide range of pottery and other artifacts were left behind to survive with the imprint of buildings in the mud from the eruption. A short article [1] published by the Archaeological Institute of America appears in Archaeology. The Avellino eruption of Mount Vesuvius (ital. ...


Called Nuvlana on the most ancient coins, was one of the oldest cities of Campania, Nola is variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians from Cumae and the Etruscans. The last-named were certainly in Nola about 560 BC. At the time when it sent assistance to Neapolis against the Roman invasion (328 BC) it was probably occupied by Oscans in alliance with the Samnites. In the Samnite War (311 BC) the town was taken by the Romans, in the Second Punic War it thrice offered defiance to Hannibal (first, second, and third Battle of Nola) and on two occasions (215 and 214) was defended by Marcellus. In the Social War it was betrayed into the hands of the Samnites, who kept possession till Marius, with whom they had sided, was defeated by Sulla, who in 80 BC subjected it with the rest of Samnium. Seven years later it was stormed by Spartacus, for which reason Augustus and Vespasian sent colonies there. The Ausones (Italian: Ausoni) were an ancient Italics tribe settled in the southern Italy. ... Cumae (Cuma, in Italian) is an ancient Greek settlement lying to the northwest of Naples in the Italian region of Campania. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC Events and Trends 562 BC - Amel-Marduk succeeds Nebuchadnezzar as king of Babylon 560 BC - Neriglissar succeeds... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 333 BC 332 BC 331 BC 330 BC 329 BC - 328 BC - 327 BC 326 BC 325... Combatants Image:SPQR-Stone. ... Hannibal, the son of Hamilcar Barca, (247 BC – c. ... The First Battle of Nola was fought in 216 BC between the forces of Hannibal and a Roman force led by Marcus Claudius Marcellus. ... The Second Battle of Nola was fought in 215 BC between Hannibals army and a Roman Army under Marcus Claudius Marcellus. ... The Third Battle of Nola was fought in 214 BC between Hannibal and Roman army led by Marcus Claudius Marcellus. ... Template:Campaignbox Social War This article is about the conflict between Rome and her allies between 91 and 88 BC The Social War (also called the Italian War or the Marsic War, Social come from Socii meaning ¨Allies¨) was a war from 91 – 88 BC between the Roman Republic and... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L·CORNELIVS·L·F·P·N·SVLLA·FELIX)[1] ( 138 BC–78 BC), usually known simply as Sulla,[2] was a Roman general and dictator. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 85 BC 84 BC 83 BC 82 BC 81 BC - 80 BC - 79 BC 78 BC 77... Samnite warriors Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south... Spartacus by Denis Foyatier, 1830 Spartacus (ca. ...


Nola, though losing much of its importance, remained a municipium with its own institutions and the use of the Oscan language. It became a Roman colony under Augustus, who died here in 14 AD. Later it became an important site of Christian pilgrimage and hospitality, after the Christian senator Paulinus relocated to the town, eventually becoming bishop. Oscan, the language of the Osci, is in the Sabellic branch of the Italic language family, which is a branch of Indo-European and includes Umbrian, Latin and Faliscan. ... Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS), for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus, St. ...


Nola lay on the Via Popilia from Capua to Nocera Inferiore and the south, and a branch road ran from it to Abella and Avellino. Mommsen (Corp. inscr. Lat. X. 142) further states that roads must have run direct from Nola to Neapolis and Pompeii, but Kiepert's map annexed to the volume does not indicate them. Capua is a city in the province of Caserta, (Campania, Italy) situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Napoli, on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. ... Nocera Inferiore, formerly Nocera dei Pagani (anc. ... Abella was a 14th century Italian physician who taught at the Salerno school of medicine. ... Avellino is a town and comune, capital of the Avellino Province, and located in the Campania region of southern Italy. ... Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen (30 November 1817 - 1 November 1903) was a German classical scholar and historian, generally regarded as the greatest classicist of the 19th century. ... Alternate uses: See Naples (disambiguation) Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα-Πόλις, latinised in Neapolis) is the largest town in southern Italy, capital of Campania region. ... Pompeii is a ruined Roman city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. ... Heinrich Kiepert (July 31, 1818 - April 21, 1899), German geographer, was born at Berlin. ...


Middle Ages and Modern era

In 410 AD Nola was sacked by Alaric I, in 453 by Genseric and his Vandals, in 806 and again in 904 by the Saracens. An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... Events Theodoric II succeeds his brother Thorismund as king of the Visigoths. ... Geiseric (circa 389 – January 25, 477), also spelled as Gaiseric or Genseric, was the King of the Vandals and Alans (428–477) and was one of the key players in the troubles of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century. ... Events April 12 - Nicephorus elected patriarch of Constantinople, succeeding Tarasius. ... Events Accession of Sergius III Destruction of Changan, the capital of Tang Dynasty and the largest city in the ancient world. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ...


Captured by Manfred of Sicily in the 13th century, from the time of Charles I of Anjou to the mid-15th century, Nola was a feudal possession of the Orsini baronal family. The battle of Nola (1459) is famous for the clever stratagem by which John of Anjou defeated Alfonso of Aragon. Manfred (c. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Orsini family was a powerful noble family in medieval and renaissance Rome, supplying three popes and many other leaders, and fighting with their rivals, the Colonna family, for influence. ...


Damaged by earthquakes in the 15th and centuries, Nola lost much of its importance. The revolution of 1820 under General Pepe began at Nola. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The sculptor Giovanni Marliano was a native of the city; and some of his works are preserved in the cathedral.


Nola today

Nola today is an important town close to Naples. However, most of its territory and ecomony are well under the control of the camorra. Naples panorama. ... The camorra is a mafia-like criminal organization, or secret society, in the region of Campania and the city of Naples in Italy. ...


A major camorra's activity is the illegal treatment of urban, chemical and industrial wastes in the countryside located in the region between Nola, Acerra and Marigliano. This formerly rich and green countryside is sometimes now called the "Death Triangle". The camorra is a mafia-like criminal organization, or secret society, in the region of Campania and the city of Naples in Italy. ... Acerra is a city of Campania, Italy, about 9 miles north-east of Naples, in the Naples country. ... Marigliano is towm in the province of Naples (Campania, Italy) located 25 km from Naples. ...


The scientific journal The Lancet Oncology published in 2004 a study by the Italian researcher Alfredo Mazza, a physiologist at the Italian CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche): this study revealed the terrible situation in the countryside around Marilgiano and the negative impact on the people's health. He demonstrated that the deaths by cancer are much higher than average in that region with respect the European average. The Italian National Research Council (CNR) is a public organization of great relevance in the field of scientific and technological research of the Country whose original institution goes back to year 1923. ...


Main sights and ancient findings

  • The ancient Gothic cathedral (restored in 1866, and again in 1870 after the interior was destroyed by fire), with its lofty tower.
  • Basilica di San Tommaso, built in the 3rd century but renovated. It has frescoes from the 9th-11th centuries depicting stories of Christ.
  • Basilica of SS. Apostoli, built, according to tradition, in 95 AD. Rebuilt in 1190, it was the city's cathedral until 1593. It was decorated in Baroque style in the 1740s.
  • Palazzo Orsini (built in 1470, although modified later).
  • The Late-Renaissance church of San Biagio, decorated with polychrome marbles and paintings from some of the most renowned 17th century Neapolitan painters.
  • The seminary in which are preserved the famous Oscan inscription known as the Cippus Abellanus (from Abella, the modern Avella) and some Latin inscriptions relating to a treaty with Nola regarding a joint temple of Hercules.
  • Castle of Cicala, in the neighbourhood.

In the days of its independence Nola issued an important series of coins, and in luxury it vied with Capua. A large number of vases of Greek style were manufactured here and have been found in the neighbourhood. Their material is of pale yellow clay with shining black glaze, and they are decorated with skilfully drawn red figures. Of the ancient city, which occupied the same site as the modern town, hardly any thing is now visible, and the discoveries of the ancient street pavement have not been noted with sufficient care to enable us to recover the plan. Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Avella, Italy. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ...


Numerous ruins, an amphitheatre, still recognizable, a theatre, a temple of Augustus, etc., existed in the 16th century, and were then used for building material. A few tombs of the Roman period are preserved. The neighbourhood was divided into pagi, the names of some of which are preserved to us (Pagus Agrifanus, Capriculanus, Lanitanus). Prehistoric findings are also housed in the Archaeological Museum. The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


There is also a monument to Giordano Bruno, who was born at Castelcicala, a locality near Nola, in 1548. Giordano Bruno. ... Events Mary I of Scotland sent to France Births September 2 - Vincenzo Scamozzi, Italian architect (died 1616) September 29 - William V, Duke of Bavaria (died 1626) Francesco Andreini, Italian actor (died 1624) Giordano Bruno, Italian philosopher, astronomer, and occultist (burned at the stake) 1600 (died 1600) Honda Tadakatsu, Japanese general...


Famous people

Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of Rome, died in Nola on August 19 14 AD. Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS), for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... (Redirected from 14 AD) For other uses, see number 14. ...


Nola was the birthplace of Luigi Tansillo, Giovanni Merliano, whose work is well represented in the cathedral, of the physician Ambrogio Leo, and of the philosopher Nicola Antonio Stigliola. Nicola Antonio Stigliola (1548 Nola – 1623 Naples) was an Italian philosopher, printer, architect, and medical doctor. ...


Nola was the home of Saint Felix of Nola. The city was also the episcopal see of Saint Paulinus of Nola, a major theologian and writer of the late Western Roman Empire, and who is also credited with inventing the church bell (campana in Italian, taking its name from Campania). The church erected by him in honour of St. Felix in the 4th century is extant in part. Saint Felix of Nola (feast day: January 14) was the elder son of Hermias, a Syrian soldier who had retired to Nola, Italy. ... Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus, St. ... Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a wedding... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ...


Nola is however mostly known as the hometown of the philosopher Giordano Bruno. Giordano Bruno. ...


Culture

Two fairs are held in Nola, on June 14 and November 12. July 22 or the first Sunday after is devoted to a great festival ("La Festa Dei Gigli" or "The Festival of the Lillies") in honor of St. Paulinus. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ...


External links

See also

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

Coordinates: 40°56′N 14°32′E The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia, also referred to today as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by The Encyclopedia Press. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nola - definition of Nola in Encyclopedia (658 words)
Nola, a city and episcopal see of Campania, Italy, in the province of Naples, pleasantly situated in the plain between Mount Vesuvius and the Apennines, 16 miles ENE of Naples, 121 feet above sea-level.
Nola was one of the oldest cities of Campania, variously said to have been founded by the Ausones, the Chalcidians and the Etruscans.
Nola lay on the Via Popillia from Capua to Nuceria and the south, and a branch road ran from it to Abella and Abellinum.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nola (704 words)
The city of Nola in the Italian Province of Caserta, in Campania, is said to have been founded by the Etruscans or by Chalcideans from Cumae.
The battle of Nola (1459) is famous for the clever stratagem by which John of Anjou defeated Alfonso of Aragon.
Nola was the birthplace of Giordano Bruno, of Luigi Tausillo, the philosopher and poet, of the sculptor Giovanni Merliano, whose work is well represented in the cathedral, and of the physician Ambrogio Leo.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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