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Encyclopedia > Noel Coward
Sir Noel Coward

Birth name Noël Peirce Coward
Born December 16, 1899
Middlesex, England
Died March 26, 1973 (aged 73)
Blue Harbor, Jamaica

Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. Image File history File links Noelcoward. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film written by and starring Noel Coward, and directed by Coward and David Lean, both making their directorial debut. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Teddington, Middlesex, England to a middle-class family, he was the second of a family of three sons (the eldest of whom died in 1898 at the age of six) of Arthur Sabin Coward (1856–1937), a clerk, and his wife, Violet Agnes (1863–1954), daughter of Henry Gordon Veitch, captain and surveyor in the Royal Navy. He began performing in the West End at an early age. He was a childhood friend of Hermione Gingold, whose mother warned her against him. , Teddington is an area on the Middlesex bank of the Thames between Hampton Wick and Twickenham in Middlesex, England, and stretches inland from the Thames to Bushy Park. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Hermione Gingold (December 9, 1897-May 24, 1987) was an English actress known for her sharp-tongued, eccentric persona, an image enhanced by her sharp nose and chin, as well as her deepening voice, a result of vocal nodes which her mother encouraged her not to remove. ...


A student at the Italia Conti Academy stage school, Coward’s first professional engagement was on 27 January 1911, in the children’s play, The Goldfish. After this appearance, he was sought after for children’s roles by other professional theatres. The Italia Conti Academy is Britains oldest theatre arts training school. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212...


At the age of fourteen he was the lover of Philip Streatfeild, a society painter who took him in and introduced him to high society, in the form of Mrs. Astley Cooper.[1] Cooper had him live on her property in Rutland, not in the Hall but on the farm, due to his lower social class.[citation needed] Streatfeild died due to disease during WWI James Philip Sydney Streatfeild (November 5, 1879-1915) was an English painter, bohemian and homosexual. ...


He was featured in several productions with Sir Charles Hawtrey, a Victorian actor and comedian, whom Coward idolized and to whom he virtually apprenticed himself until he was twenty. It was from Hawtrey that Coward learned comic acting techniques and playwriting. He was drafted briefly into the British Army during World War I but was discharged due to ill health. Coward appeared in the D. W. Griffith film Hearts of the World (1918) in an uncredited role. He found his voice and began writing plays that he and his friends could star in while at the same time writing revues. Sir Charles Henry Hawtrey (September 21, 1858 - July 30, 1923), was a celebrated Victorian / Edwardian stage actor, knighted in 1922 by King George V. He was a comedian, actor, director, producer/manager. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Hearts of the World is a D.W. Griffiths silent film, a war-time propaganda classic that was filmed on location in Britain and near the Western Front, made at the request of the British Government to change the neutral mindset of the American public. ...


Success

He starred in one of his first full-length plays, the inheritance comedy I'll Leave It To You, in 1920 at the age of twenty. The following year a one act satire The Better Half was completed, concerning a man's relationship with two women, and had a short run at the Little Theatre, London in 1922. The play was thought to be lost until a typescript was rediscovered in 2007 in the archive of the Lord Chamberlain's Office; plays for performance had to be licensed at this time in the UK and were subject to cuts or complete bans.[1] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The Lord Chamberlains Office is a department within the British Royal Household. ...


After enjoying some moderate success with the Shaw-esque The Young Idea in 1923, the controversy surrounding his play The Vortex (1924) — which contains many veiled references to both drug abuse and homosexuality — made him an overnight sensation on both sides of the Atlantic. Coward followed this success with three more major hits, Hay Fever, Fallen Angels (both 1925) and Easy Virtue (1926). George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Drug abuse has a wide range of definitions related to taking a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... “Atlantic” redirects here. ... For the play, see Hay Fever. ... Fallen Angels is a 1925 play by British actor and playwright Noel Coward. ... Easy Virtue is a 1928 silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ...


Much of Coward's best work came in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Enormous (and enormously popular) productions such as the full-length operetta Bitter Sweet (1929) and Cavalcade (1931), a huge extravaganza requiring a very large cast, gargantuan sets and an exceedingly complex hydraulic stage, were interspersed with finely-wrought comedies such as Private Lives (1930), in which Coward himself starred alongside his most famous stage partner Gertrude Lawrence, and the black comedy Design for Living (1932), written for Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne. Operetta (literally, little opera) is a performance art-form similar to opera, though it generally deals with less serious topics. ... Bitter Sweet is an operetta written by Noel Coward and first produced in 1929 at Her Majestys Theatre in London. ... Cavalcade was a spectacular stage play written by Noel Coward, premiered in London in 1931 and later made into a commercially and critically successful film, though it is little remembered now. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ... Gertrude Lawrence (June 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films. ... Design for Living is a black comedy written by Noel Coward which premiered in 1932. ... Alfred Lunt photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Alfred Lunt (August 12, 1892–August 3, 1977) was an American actor. ... Lynn Fontanne (December 6, 1887 – July 30, 1983) was an Emmy Award winning actress who was a major stage star for over 40 years and who with her husband Alfred Lunt was part of the most acclaimed acting team in the history of the American theater. ...


Coward again partnered Lawrence in Tonight at 8:30 (1936), an ambitious cycle of ten different short plays which were randomly "shuffled" to make up a different playbill of three plays each night. One of these short plays, Still Life, was later expanded into the 1945 David Lean film Brief Encounter. He was also a prolific writer of popular songs, and a lucrative recording contract with HMV allowed him to release a number of recordings which have been extensively reissued on CD. Coward's most popular hits include the romantic, I'll See You Again and Dear Little Cafe, as well as the comic Mad Dogs and Englishmen, The Stately Homes of England and (Don't Put Your Daughter on the Stage) Mrs Worthington Tonight at 8:30 (1936) is a unique cycle of short plays by Noel Coward, the first production of which was a bold experiment in the history of theatre. ... A still life is a work of art which represents a subject composed of inanimate objects. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... Brief Encounter (1945) is a British film about a womans temptation toward adultery. ... A song written by Noël Coward in 1931 and released in a studio version in 1932 It is best known for its chorus that begins Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun In tropical climes there are certain times of day When all the citizens retire...


World War II

The outbreak of World War II in 1939 saw Coward working harder than ever. When the second World War started, Noel had only just left Paris. He took time off from writing to perform for the troops, but after was eager to return. Alongside his highly-publicised tours entertaining Allied troops, Coward was also engaged by the British Secret Service MI5 to conduct intelligence work. He was often frustrated by criticism he faced for his ostensibly glamorous lifestyle; criticised for apparently living the high life while his countrymen suffered, he was unable to defend himself by revealing details of his work for the Secret Service. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... MI5 Logo. ...


Had the Germans invaded Britain, Noel Coward would have been arrested and liquidated as he was on The Black Book, along with other public figures such as H. G. Wells (Wells was targeted for his socialist views). While some feel that this may have been due to his homosexuality, recent documents have surfaced showing Coward to have been a covert operative in the Secret Service. The Black Book was a product of the SS Einsatzgruppen. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


He also wrote and released some extraordinarily popular songs during the war (the most famous of which are London Pride and Don't Let's Be Beastly To The Germans). He complained to his frequent painting companion, Winston Churchill, that he felt he wasn't doing enough to support the war effort. Churchill suggested he make a movie based on the career of Captain Lord Louis Mountbatten. The result was a naval film drama, In Which We Serve, which Coward wrote, starred in, composed the music for and co-directed with David Lean. The film was immensely popular on both sides of the Atlantic and Coward was awarded an honorary Oscar. London Pride is a song written and composed by Noel Coward. ... Dont Lets Be Beastly To The Germans was a satiric, patriotic song popular in Britain in World War II. It was composed by Noel Coward. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film written by and starring Noel Coward, and directed by Coward and David Lean, both making their directorial debut. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


The 1940s also saw Coward write some of his best plays. The social commentary of This Happy Breed and the intricate semi-autobiographical comedy-drama Present Laughter (both 1939) were later combined with the hugely successful black comedy Blithe Spirit (1941) to form a West End triple-bill in which Coward starred in all three simultaneous productions. Blithe Spirit went on to break box-office records for a West End comedy not beaten until the 1970s, and was made into a film directed by David Lean. This Happy Breed was a stage play written by Noel Coward, first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with the same authors Present Laughter. ... Present Laughter is a comedic play written by Noel Coward and first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with his lower middle-class domestic drama This Happy Breed; in 1941 the double bill was expanded to include Cowards new play Blithe Spirit. ... Blithe Spirit (1941) is a comic play written by Noel Coward. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ...


Later works

Coward's popularity as a playwright declined sharply in the 1950s, with plays such as Quadrille, Relative Values, Nude with Violin and South Sea Bubble all failing to find much favour with critics or audiences. Despite this, he still managed to maintain a high public profile, continuing to write (and occasionally star in) moderately successful West End plays and musicals, performing an acclaimed solo cabaret act in Las Vegas (recorded for posterity and still available on CD), and starring in films such as Bunny Lake is Missing, Around the World in 80 Days, Our Man in Havana, Boom!, and The Italian Job. This article is about the Noel Coward play. ... Relative Values is a play by Noel Coward and a 2000 film adaptation of that play. ... Nude with Violin is a 1950s play by British actor and playwright Noel Coward. ... This article is about the Noel Coward play. ... Vegas redirects here. ... Bunny Lake is Missing is a film in the psychological thriller genre directed by Otto Preminger. ... Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingt jours) is a classic adventure novel by Jules Verne, first published in 1872. ... Our Man in Havana is a 1959 film directed by Carol Reed and starring Alec Guinness, Burl Ives, Maureen OHara and Ernie Kovacs. ... Boom! is a 1968 film starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Noël Coward. ... The Italian Job is a British caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. ...


After starring in a number of American TV specials in the late 50s alongside Mary Martin, Coward left the UK for tax reasons. He first settled in Bermuda but later moved to Jamaica, where he remained for the rest of his life. His play Waiting in the Wings (1960), set in a rest home for retired actresses, marked a turning-point in his popularity, gaining plaudits from critics who likened it to the work of Anton Chekhov. The late 1960s saw a revival in his popularity, with several new productions of his 1920s plays and a number of revues celebrating his music; Coward himself dubbed this comeback "Dad's Renaissance". Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) born in Weatherford, Texas, was a Tony Award winning American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Waiting in the Wings was Northwestern Universitys 74th annual Waa-Mu show. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ...


Coward's final stage work was a trilogy of plays set in a hotel penthouse suite, with him taking the lead roles in all three, under the collective title of Suite in Three Keys (1966); the plays gained excellent reviews and did good box office business in the UK. Coward intended to star in Suite in Three Keys on Broadway but was unable to travel due to illness; the lead roles in the plays in New York were eventually taken by Hume Cronyn. Only two of the plays were performed, with the title changed to Noel Coward in Two Keys. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Death

By now suffering from severe arthritis and bouts of memory loss (which affected his work on The Italian Job), Coward retired from the theatre. He was knighted in 1970, and died in Jamaica in March 1973 of heart failure at the age of 73. He was buried three days later in the brow of Firefly Hill, Jamaica, overlooking the north coast of the island. On March 28, 1984 a memorial stone was unveiled by the Queen Mother in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Poets corner Poets’ Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights, and writers now buried and commemorated there. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


As well as over fifty published plays and many albums' worth of original songs, Coward also wrote comic revues, poetry, several volumes of short stories, a novel (Pomp and Circumstance, 1960), and three volumes of autobiography. Books of his song lyrics, diaries and letters have also been published. This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ...


He was also a spirited painter, and a volume containing reproductions of some of his artwork has also been published.


The Noël Coward Theatre on St Martin's Lane opened on 1 June 2006, after extensive refurbishment, for the London premiere of Avenue Q. The theatre itself first opened in 1903 as the New Theatre (undergoing a name change to the Albery Theatre in 1973). It was in 1920 at the New Theatre that Noel Coward made his West End début. Noël Coward Theatre from a postcard, circa 1905. ... St. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Avenue Q is a Tony award-winning musical that was conceived by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, who wrote the music and lyrics. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Private life

Being homosexual, Coward never married, but he maintained close personal friendships with many women. These included actress and author Esmé Wynne-Tyson, his first collaborator and constant correspondent; the designer and lifelong friend Gladys Calthrop; secretary and close confidante Lorn Loraine; his muse, the gifted musical actress Gertrude Lawrence; actress Joyce Carey; compatriot of his middle period, the light comedy actress Judy Campbell; and (in the words of Cole Lesley) 'his loyal and lifelong amitié amoureuse film star Marlene Dietrich. Gertrude Lawrence (June 4, 1898 - September 6, 1952) was an actress and musical performer popular in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing on stage in London and on Broadway, and in several films. ... British actress Performed in many Noel Coward plays This article about an actor or actress is a stub. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ...


He was also a valued friend of Vivien Leigh, Judy Garland, Princess Margaret and Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. He was a close friend of Ivor Novello and Winston Churchill. Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Ivor Novello David Ivor Davies (January 15, 1893 – March 6, 1951), better known as Ivor Novello, was a Welsh composer, singer and actor who became one of the most popular British entertainers of the early 20th century. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ...


Coward's insights into the class system can be traced back to London life in World War I, when thousands of troops passed through the capital every day, and gay officers and other-ranks would meet together with civilians in dozens of highly-secret clubs.


He enjoyed a 19-year relationship with Prince George, Duke of Kent[2] and another lengthy one with the stage and film actor, Graham Payn, for almost thirty years until the end of Coward's life. Payn later co-edited (with Sheridan Morley) the collection of his diaries, published in 1982. He was also connected to composer Ned Rorem with details of their relationship published in Rorem's diaries. The Prince George, Duke of Kent (George Edward Alexander Edmund) (20 December 1902–25 August 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, the fourth son of King George V. He held the title of Duke of Kent from 1934 to his death in 1942. ... Graham Payn (25 April 1918 – 4 November 2005) was born in Pietermaritzburg in South Africa. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Ned Rorem (born October 23, 1923) is a noted American composer and diarist. ...


Coward refused to acknowledge his homosexuality, wryly stating, "There is still a woman in Paddington Square who wants to marry me, and I don't want to disappoint her." Also, from his youth Coward had a distaste for penetrative sex and held the modern homosexual scene in disdain.[3] Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ...


He served as the president of The Actors' Orphanage, an orphanage supported by the theatrical industry. In that capacity he befriended the young Peter Collinson, who was in the care of the orphanage, eventually becoming Collinson's godfather and helping him get started in show business. When Collinson was a successful director he invited Coward to play a role in the film The Italian Job; Graham Payn also played a small role. The Actors Orphanage was started in 1896 by Kittie Carson at Croydon and was established as The Actors Orphanage Fund in 1912. ... Peter Collinson (April 1, 1936 – December 16, 1980) was a British film director probably best known for directing the 1969 cult movie The Italian Job. ... The Italian Job is a British caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. ...


Coward was a neighbour of James Bond creator Ian Fleming in Jamaica, and his wife Anne, the former Lady Rothermere. Though he was very fond of both of them, the Flemings' marriage was not a happy one, and Noel eventually tired of their constant bickering, as recorded in his diaries. When the first film adaptation of a James Bond novel, Dr. No was being produced, Coward was approached for the role of the villain. He is said to have responded, "Doctor No? No. No. No." Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Dr. No is a 1962 spy film. ...


When speaking to Peter O'Toole about his performance in Lawrence of Arabia, he said "If you'd been any prettier, it would have been 'Florence of Arabia'." Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ...


When someone pointed out a rising young actor at a party with the words "Keir Dullea" Coward's instant reply was "Gone tomorrow." Keir Dullea (born May 30, 1936) is an actor best remembered for his role as astronaut David Bowman in the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey and in 1984s 2010: The Year We Make Contact. ...


The Papers of Noel Coward are held at the University of Birmingham Special Collections. Website http://www. ...


On the BBC Midweek programme on October 11, 2006, Hunter Davies revealed that Coward had told him during an interview that he liked to attend and watch hospital operations in his spare time; apparently when Mr Davies started to push this line further Coward clammed up on the subject and wouldn't elaborate. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hunter Davies (born 7 January 1936) is a prolific British author, journalist and broadcaster, best known for his books about The Beatles. ...


Parodies and popular culture

Parodies of and homages to Coward and his style include: Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

  • The character of Beverly Carlton in the 1939 Broadway play The Man Who Came to Dinner was based on Coward. He was portrayed by Reginald Gardiner in the 1942 film of the play.
  • In the sixth season of Frasier in an episode entitled "How to Bury a Millionaire", Niles Crane purchases a pen once owned by Noel Coward.
  • In the third season of Frasier, Frasier gives a Christmas gift to his father, that he says "Noel Coward would love, but you wouldn't love"
  • Charles and Fiona, (Dame Celia Molestrangler and Aging juvenile Binkie Huckaback) characters in Round the Horne.
  • In the 1982 film Better Late Than Never, David Niven played Nick Cartland, an ageing cabaret artiste, whose showpiece is I've Been To A Marvellous Party.
  • Jon Wynne-Tyson's play Marvellous Party, about a middle-age reunion in Las Vegas between Noel Coward and his collaborator Esmé Wynne-Tyson was broadcast by the BBC World Service in May 1994, starring Stanley Baxter as Coward and Dorothy Tutin as Esmé.
  • In 1998 Twentieth-Century Blues: The Songs of Noel Coward was released. The album contains versions of Coward's songs performed by Sting, Elton John, Pet Shop Boys, The Divine Comedy, Vic Reeves, Paul McCartney and others.
  • Coward appeared as a regular character in the fifth and sixth series of the BBC sitcom Goodnight Sweetheart.
  • Coward is the leading figure in Jeremy Kingston's comedy, Making Dickie Happy, also featuring Agatha Christie and Louis Mountbatten (the 'Dickie' of the title) as other characters, first staged at the Rosemary Branch Theatre in London in September 2004 [2]'
  • The name for the men's clothing line 'Godspeed the Well-Dressed Man' came from the closing of one of Coward's letters.
  • Monty Python reference him in the song name Penis Song (Not the Noel Coward Song) on their album Monty Python Sings.
  • The Doctor Who novel Mad Dogs and Englishmen features a version of Noel Coward who has allied himself with alien poodles and gained time travel technology.
  • The opening to the song "The Lady Is a Tramp" includes the line "Alas, I missed the Beaux Arts Ball, and what is twice as sad I was never at a party where they honored Noel Ca-ad (Coward)".
  • Coward's play "Private Lives" is parodied in the off-Broadway musical revue "Secrets Every Smart Traveler Should Know" in a short scene entitled "Private Wives."

The Man Who Came to Dinner, comedy in three acts written by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart that debuted on October 16, 1939 at the Music Box Theatre in New York City. ... Reginald Gardiner (February 27, 1903-July 7, 1980) was a British-born actor in film and television. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... How to Bury a Millionaire is the seventh episode in the sixth series of the American NBC television sitcom Frasier. ... Dr. Niles Winslow Crane (b. ... Round the Horne was one of the most influential BBC Radio comedy programmes, comparable to The Goon Show in its influence on other comedy programmes. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters of radio programming, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world. ... Stanley Baxter, (born May 24, 1926 in Glasgow, Scotland), is a comic actor and impressionist, best known for his UK TV shows. ... Dame Dorothy Tutin Order of the British Empire|DBE (8 April 1930–6 August 2001), was a highly-regarded English actress of stage, film, and television. ... Goodnight Sweetheart was a British sitcom starring Nicholas Lyndhurst as Gary Sparrow, an ordinary modern man who discovers a time portal in Stepney, in the East End of London that allows him to travel back to the Second World War. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), mainly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Rosemary Branch Theatre is a pub theatre in Shoreditch Categories: | | ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... The Penis Song is a song originally from the film Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life and released on the album Monty Python Sings. ... Monty Python Sings was a comedy album of songs written by the Monty Python team. ... Mad Dogs and Englishmen is a BBC Books original novel written by Paul Magrs and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Poodle is a breed of dog; specifically, it is a gundog noted for its ability in the water. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ...

Plays

  • The Last Chapter (Ida Collaborates) (1917), one-act comedy, co-written with Esmé Wynne under their joint pen name Esnomel, fp 1917
  • Woman and Whisky (1918), one-act play, co-written with Esmé Wynne, fp 1918
  • The Rat Trap (1918), play in four acts, fp Everyman, Hampstead 1926, first revived Finborough, London 2006
  • I'll Leave It To You (1919), light comedy in three acts, fp 1920
  • The Young Idea (1921), comedy of youth in three acts, fp 1922
  • The Sirocco (1921), play in three acts, revised and fp 1927
  • The Better Half (1921), comedy in one act, fp 1922
  • The Queen Was in the Parlour (1922), play in three acts, fp 1926
  • Mild Oats (1922), play in one act, unproduced
  • Weatherwise (1923), comedy in two scenes, fp 1932
  • Fallen Angels (1923), comedy in three acts, fp 1925
  • The Vortex (1923), play in three acts, fp 1924
  • Hay Fever (1924), comedy, fp 1925
  • Easy Virtue (1924), play in three acts, fp 1925
  • Semi-Monde originally Ritz Bar (1926), play in three acts, fp Glasgow Citizens 1988
  • This Was a Man (1926), comedy in three acts, fp 1926
  • The Marquise (1926), comedy in three acts, fp 1927
  • Home Chat (1927), play in three acts, fp 1927
  • Private Lives (1929), intimate comedy in three acts, fp 1930
  • Post-Mortem (1932), play in eight scenes, fp King's Head, London, 1992
  • Cavalcade (1930, 1931), play in three parts, fp 1931
  • Design For Living (1932), comedy in three acts, fp 1933
  • Point Valaine (1934), play in three acts, fp 1934
  • Tonight at 8.30 (1935, 1936), three programmes of one-act plays, fp 1935:
  • Present Laughter (1939), play in three acts, fp 1942
  • This Happy Breed (1939), play in three acts, fp 1942
  • Blithe Spirit (1941), improbable farce in three acts, fp 1941
  • Peace In Our Time (1946), play in two acts, fp 1947
  • Long Island Sound (1947), comedy adapted from his short story What Mad Pursuit?, fp 1989 (Windsor gala performance)
  • South Sea Bubble, Island Fling in USA, (1949), comedy in three acts, fp 1951
  • Relative Values (1951), comedy in three acts, fp 1951
  • Quadrille (1951-2), romantic comedy in three acts, fp 1952
  • Nude With Violin (1954), comedy in three acts, fp 1956
  • Look After Lulu! (1958), three act farce adapted from Feydeau, fp 1959
  • Volcano (1957), play in two acts, Mill at Sonning staged reading only 1989
  • Waiting in the Wings (1959-60), play in three acts, fp 1960
  • Suite in Three Keys: A Song at Twilight; Shadows of the Evening; Come into the Garden, Maud (1965), a trilogy, fp 1966
  • Star Quality (1967), Coward's last play, comedy in three acts, fp Bath, 1985

The Rat Trap (1918) is a four act drama by Noel Coward, his first really serious attempt at psychological conflict, written when he was only 18. ... The Better Half is a one-act play by Noel Coward first performed in 1922 by the Grand Guignol company. ... Weatherwise (ISSN 0043-1672) is a magazine by Heldref Publications on weather and climate for weather enthusiasts as well as meteorologists and climatologists. ... Fallen Angels is a 1925 play by British actor and playwright Noel Coward. ... For the play, see Hay Fever. ... Easy Virtue is a 1928 silent film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Semi-Monde is a play written by Noel Coward in 1926, but not produced until 1977. ... This Was A Man is a play in three acts by Noel Coward. ... Private Lives is a play written by Noel Coward in 1930. ... Cavalcade was a spectacular stage play written by Noel Coward, premiered in London in 1931 and later made into a commercially and critically successful film, though it is little remembered now. ... Design for Living is a black comedy written by Noel Coward which premiered in 1932. ... Hands Across the Sea is a patriotic/military march composed in 1899 by John Philip Sousa. ... Shadow play A shadow play is an ancient form of story-telling and entertainment using opaque, often articulated figures in front of an illuminated backdrop to create the illusion of moving images. ... Ways and Means may refer to: Committee of Ways and Means of the UK parliament United States House Committee on Ways and Means Ways and Means, an episode of The West Wing This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Family Album is the name of a Danielle Steel romance novel and of a TV movie based on it. ... The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law at the royal Palace of Westminster that sat between 1487 and 1641, when the court itself was abolished. ... Present Laughter is a comedic play written by Noel Coward and first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with his lower middle-class domestic drama This Happy Breed; in 1941 the double bill was expanded to include Cowards new play Blithe Spirit. ... This Happy Breed was a stage play written by Noel Coward, first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with the same authors Present Laughter. ... Blithe Spirit (1941) is a comic play written by Noel Coward. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... Hogarthian image of the South Sea Bubble by Edward Matthew Ward, Tate Gallery More well known than The South Sea Company is perhaps the South Sea Bubble (1711 - September 1720) which is the name given to the economic bubble that occurred through overheated speculation in the company shares during 1720. ... Relative Values is a play by Noel Coward and a 2000 film adaptation of that play. ... This article is about the Noel Coward play. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Waiting in the Wings was Northwestern Universitys 74th annual Waa-Mu show. ... The term star quality has numerous references: star quality (attribute) - the attribute of a leading star, such as a movie star, with synonyms: allure, allurement, animal magnetism, appeal, attraction, charisma, dazzle, fascination, flash, glamour, it, got it, magnetism, pizzazz, something, witchcraft, witchery. ...

Revues, musicals and operetta

London Calling is a double album released by The Clash in December 1979, in the UK and the first week of January 1980 in the U.S. The album marked the bands critical and commercial breakthrough. ... On With the Dance was the first episode of the fifth and final series of the period drama Upstairs, Downstairs. ... Bitter Sweet is an operetta written by Noel Coward and first produced in 1929 at Her Majestys Theatre in London. ... Words And Music is an album recorded by Paul Kelly and originally released in 1998. ... Conversation Piece is a song written by David Bowie. ... Sigh No More was the second studio album released by German power metal band, Gamma Ray in 1991 by Noise Records. ... Set of 52 playing cards Some typical Anglo-American playing cards. ... Oscar Wilde. ... Original cast recording The Girl Who Came to Supper is a musical with a book by Harry Kurnitz and music and lyrics by Noël Coward. ... The Sleeping Prince is a 1953 play by Terrence Rattigan. ...

Filmography

Hearts of the World is a D.W. Griffiths silent film, a war-time propaganda classic that was filmed on location in Britain and near the Western Front, made at the request of the British Government to change the neutral mindset of the American public. ... The Scoundrel was Noel Cowards film debut, aside from a bit role in a silent film. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film written by and starring Noel Coward, and directed by Coward and David Lean, both making their directorial debut. ... The film Blithe Spirit is a 1945 British comedy film of the popular Noel Coward play. ... Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, first published in 1873. ... Our Man in Havana is a 1959 film directed by Carol Reed and starring Alec Guinness, Burl Ives, Maureen OHara and Ernie Kovacs. ... Paris - When It Sizzles is a 1964 romantic film comedy made by Richard Quine Productions and Charleston Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... Present Laughter is a comedic play written by Noel Coward and first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with his lower middle-class domestic drama This Happy Breed; in 1941 the double bill was expanded to include Cowards new play Blithe Spirit. ... Bunny Lake is Missing is a film in the psychological thriller genre directed by Otto Preminger. ... Androcles and the Lion is a 1952 RKO film produced by Gabriel Pascal from the George Bernard Shaw play. ... Boom! is a 1968 film starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Noël Coward. ... The Italian Job is a British caper film, written by Troy Kennedy Martin, produced by Michael Deeley and directed by Peter Collinson. ...

References

  1. ^ Vanessa Thorpe "Coward's long-lost satire was almost too 'daring' about women", The Observer, 16 September 2007. Retrieved on 16 September 2007.
  2. ^ Picknett, Lynn, Prince, Clive, Prior, Stephen & Brydon, Robert (2002). War of the Windsors: A Century of Unconstitutional Monarchy, p. 56. Mainstream Publishing. ISBN 1-84018-631-3.
  3. ^ Noel Coward: A Biography Philip Hoare p.34

Bibliography

  • Coward, Noel Present Indicative, autobiography to 1931. Heinemann 1937, facsimile reissue 1974 ISBN 0-434-14723-0
  • Coward, Noel Future Indefinite, second volume of autobiography, WWII. Heinemann 1954
  • Coward, Noel Past Conditional, third volume (unfinished) of autobiography. Heinemann 1986
  • Coward, Noel Middle East Diary, a diary of a wartime tour to entertain the troops "from Gib to Baghdad". Heinemann 1944
  • Morley, Sheridan A Talent to Amuse, biography. Heinemann 1969 ISBN 0-434-47895-4
  • Lesley, Cole The Life of Noel Coward, biography. Cape 1976 ISBN 0-224-01288-6
  • Payn, Graham and Morley, Sheridan edited The Noel Coward Diaries (1941-1969). Methuen 1982 ISBN 0-297-78142-1
  • Tickner, Martin preface to Noel Coward: The Complete Stories. Methuen Paperback Original 1985 ISBN 0-413-59970-1
  • Coward, Noel, with an introduction by Morley, Sheridan Noel Coward Autobiography (a single volume combining Present Indicative and Future Indefinite). Methuen 1986 ISBN 0-413-606600
  • Payn, Graham and Tickner, Martin edited Noel Coward: Collected Verse. Methuen 1984, corrected edition 1987 ISBN 0-413-551504
  • Fisher, Clive Noel Coward. Weidenfeld 1992 ISBN 0-297-81180-0
  • Hoare, Philip Noel Coward, A Biography. Sinclair-Stevenson 1995 ISBN 1-85619-265-2
  • Day, Barry edited and annotated Noel Coward: The Complete Lyrics. Methuen 1998 ISBN 0-413-73230-4
  • Mander, Raymond and Mitchenson, Joe Theatrical Companion to Coward, updated by Day, Barry and Morley, Sheridan. Oberon 2000 ISBN 1-84002-054-7

This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Graham Payn (25 April 1918 – 4 November 2005) was born in Pietermaritzburg in South Africa. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Noel Coward

  Results from FactBites:
 
Noel Coward - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1315 words)
Sir Noel Peirce Coward (spelling his forename Noël with the diaeresis was an affectation of later life) (16 December 1899 26 March 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music.
Coward intended to star in Suite in Three Keys on Broadway but was unable to travel due to illness; the lead roles in the plays in New York were eventually taken by Hume Cronyn.
Coward was a neighbour of James Bond creator Ian Fleming in Jamaica, whom he considered a poseur.
Noel Coward - definition of Noel Coward in Encyclopedia (750 words)
Sir Noel Peirce Coward (spelling his forename Noël with the diaeresis was an affectation of later life, and "Peirce" is the correct spelling) (December 16, 1899 - March 26, 1973) was an English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music.
Coward’s first professional engagement, and that which launched his long career, was on 27 January 1911 in a children’s play, The Goldfish.
Coward, who was gay, never married but he did have a 19-year affair with Prince George, Duke of Kent, a younger brother of the Duke of Windsor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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