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Encyclopedia > Nocturne

A nocturne (from the French for "nocturnal") is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. Historically, Nocturn is a very old term applied to night Offices and, since the Middle Ages, to divisions in the canonical hour of Matins. Nocturns (Latin: Nocturni or Nocturna) are an ancient form of Christian night prayer. ... Look up nocturne in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... This article is about the time of day. ...


The name nocturne was first applied to pieces in the eighteenth century, when it indicated an ensemble piece in several movements, normally played for an evening party and then laid aside. Sometimes it carried the Italian equivalent, notturno, such as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's quadraphonic Notturno in D, K.286, written for four lightly echoing separated ensembles of paired horns with strings, and his Serenata Notturna, K. 239. At this time, the piece was not necessarily evocative of the night, but might merely be intended for performance at night, much like a serenade. “Mozart” redirects here. ... For the ancient form of Christian night prayer, see Nocturns. ... Serenade by Judith Leyster. ...


In its more familiar form as a single-movement character piece usually written for solo piano, the nocturne was cultivated primarily in the nineteenth century. The first nocturnes to be written under the specific title were by the Irish composer John Field, generally viewed as the father of the Romantic nocturne that characteristically features a cantabile melody over an arpeggiated, even guitar-like accompaniment. However, the most famous exponent of the form was Frédéric Chopin, who wrote 21 of them. Later composers to write nocturnes for the piano include Gabriel Fauré, Alexander Scriabin and Erik Satie (1919), as well as Peter Sculthorpe. One of the most famous pieces of nineteenth-century salon music was the "Fifth Nocturne" of Ignace Leybach, who is now otherwise forgotten. Character piece is a literal translation of the German Charakterstück, a term, not very precisely defined, used for a broad range of 19th century piano music based on a single idea or program. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... John Field John Field (July 26, 1782 – January 23, 1837) was an Irish composer and pianist. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Musical terminology. ... Various arpeggios as seen on a staff Notation of a chord in arpeggio In music, an arpeggio is a broken chord where the notes are played or sung in succession rather than simultaneously. ... Chopin redirects here. ... Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist, and teacher. ... Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin (Russian: Александр Николаевич Скрябин, Aleksandr Nikolajevič Skriabin; sometimes transliterated as Skryabin or Scriabine (6 January 1872 [O.S. 26 December 1871]—27 April 1915) was a Russian composer and pianist. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Ignace Xavier Joseph Leybach (17 July 1817, Gambsheim, Alsace – 23 May 1891, Toulouse) was a teacher, pianist and organist, and a composer of salon piano music. ...


Other examples of nocturnes include the one for orchestra from Felix Mendelssohn's incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream (1848), the set of three for orchestra and female choir by Claude Debussy (who also wrote one for solo piano) and the first movement of the Violin Concerto No. 1 (1948) by Dmitri Shostakovich. French composer Erik Satie composed a series of five small nocturnes. These were however, far different from those of Frédéric Chopin and John Field, based on minor chords. For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... Nocturnes is an orchestral composition in three movements by the French composer Claude Debussy. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... The Violin Concerto No. ... Dmitri Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... John Field (July 26, 1782 – January 23, 1837) was an Irish composer and pianist. ...


The first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata has also been considered a nocturne (certainly, Ludwig Rellstab, who gave the piece its nickname, thought it evocative of the night), although Beethoven did not describe it as one. “Beethoven” redirects here. ... “Piano Sonata No. ... Heinrich Friedrich Ludwig Rellstab (April 13, 1799–November 27, 1860) was a German poet and music critic. ...


Nocturnes are generally thought of as being tranquil, often expressive and lyrical, and sometimes rather gloomy, but in practice pieces with the name nocturne have conveyed a variety of moods: the second of Debussy's orchestral Nocturnes, "Fêtes", for example, is very lively.


The word was later used by James McNeill Whistler in the title of a number of his paintings, consistent with his theory that fine art should essentially be concerned with the beautiful arrangement of colors in harmony. Debussy's nocturnes were inspired by Whistler's paintings[citation needed]. Several other artists followed suit. Self portrait (1872) James Abbott McNeill Whistler (July 11, 1834 – July 17, 1903) was an American-born, British-based painter and etcher. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ...


See also

  • Nocturne: Blue and Gold - Old Battersea Bridge by Whistler (painted c.1872–

References

  • Mozart's Notturno in D, K.286: Chicago Symphony Orchestra program notes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nocturne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (545 words)
A nocturne (from the French for "nocturnal") is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night.
The first nocturnes to be written as such were by the Irish composer John Field, generally viewed as the father of the modern nocturne.
Nocturnes are generally thought of as being tranquil, often expressive and lyrical, and sometimes rather gloomy, but in practice pieces with the name nocturne have conveyed a variety of moods: the second of Debussy's orchestral Nocturnes, "Fêtes", for example, is very lively.
Nocturne (PC game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (914 words)
Nocturne is also the name of a role-playing game for the PlayStation 2.
Nocturne is a video game released for PC by Terminal Reality in 1999.
The story and elements were changed because Nocturne did not sell quite as well as had been hoped in the market, so they needed to cut off ties with the Nocturne franchise.
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