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Encyclopedia > Noah
Noah's Ark, Französischer Meister ("The French Master"), Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum, Budapest. c.1675.
Noah's Ark, Französischer Meister ("The French Master"), Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum, Budapest. c.1675.

Noah (or Noe, Noach; Hebrew: נוֹחַ or נֹחַ, Standard Nóaḥ Tiberian Nōªḥ ; Nūḥ ;Arabic: نوح ; "Rest"[1] ) was, according to the Bible, the tenth and last of the antediluvian Patriarchs. His story is contained in the book of Genesis, chapters 5-9. Noah saves his family and all animals in groups of two or seven from God's Deluge. He receives a covenant from God, and his sons repopulate the earth. Noah may refer to: In antiquity: Noah, described in the Bibles Book of Genesis, built an ark to save seven of each clean animal and two of each unclean animal from the Deluge. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x2273, 311 KB) Description: Title: de: Der Bau der Arche Noah Technique: de: Leinwand Dimensions: de: 158,5 × 109 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Budapest Current location (gallery): de: Magyar Szépmüvészeti Múzeum... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x2273, 311 KB) Description: Title: de: Der Bau der Arche Noah Technique: de: Leinwand Dimensions: de: 158,5 × 109 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Budapest Current location (gallery): de: Magyar Szépmüvészeti Múzeum... This article is about the vessel described in the Hebrew scriptures. ... The museums entrance The Museum of Fine Arts (Hungarian: Szépművészeti Múzeum) is a museum in Heroes Square, Budapest, Hungary, facing the Palace of Art. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Year 1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... According to the Bible, the only survivors from the antediluvian period were Noah and his family. ... The Patriarchs, known as the Avot in Hebrew, are Abraham, his son Isaac and his grandson Jacob. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ...


While the Deluge and Noah's Ark are the best-known elements of the account of Noah, he is also mentioned as the "first husbandman" and the inventor of wine, as well as in an episode of his drunkenness and the subsequent Curse of Ham. The account of Noah was the subject of much elaboration in the later Abrahamic traditions, and was immensely influential in Western culture. Jewish thinkers have debated the extent of Noah's righteousness, Christians have likened the Christian Church to Noah's ark, and in Islam he is revered as a prophet of God. This article is about great floods. ... This article is about the vessel described in the Hebrew scriptures. ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini, depicting Ham (center) laughing at his father, while Shem and Japheth cover him. ... An Abrahamic religion (also referred to as desert monotheism) is any religion derived from an ancient Semitic tradition attributed to Abraham, a great patriarch described in the Torah, the Bible and the Quran. ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...

Contents

Summary

The Deluge, by Michelangelo
The Deluge, by Michelangelo

According to chapters 5–9 of the book of Genesis, Noah was the son of Lamech, and the ninth generation after Adam. "And Lamech called his name Noah, saying, "Out of the ground which the Lord has cursed this one shall bring us relief from our work and from the toil of our hands." From Noah's sons, Shem, Japheth and Ham, all the peoples of the world would be descended.[2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1034x516, 128 KB) Michelangelo, The Deluge (very good photo) Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1034x516, 128 KB) Michelangelo, The Deluge (very good photo) Source: http://www. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Lamech (in Hebrew לֶמֶך Lemmech) is the name of two men appearing in the genealogies of Adam in the book of Genesis. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Lamech (in Hebrew לֶמֶך Lemmech) is the name of two men appearing in the genealogies of Adam in the book of Genesis. ... Shem (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Greek: Σημ, SÄ“m ; Arabic:  ; Geez: Sham ; renown; prosperity; name) was one of the sons of Noah in the Bible. ... Japheth (Hebrew. ... Ham (חָם, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , , Geez Kam), according to the Genealogies of Genesis, was a son of Noah and the father of Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan. ...


When Noah was six hundred years old, God, seeing man's wickedness which had become abundant in the earth, was saddened, and decided to send a great deluge to destroy disobedient mankind. But He saw that Noah was a righteous man, and instructed him to build an ark and gather himself and his family.[3] And God said to Noah, "Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female."[4] And so the Flood came, and all life was extinguished, except for those who were with Noah, "and the waters prevailed upon the earth for one-hundred and fifty days"[5] until the Ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. There Noah built an altar to God (the first altar mentioned in the Bible) and made an offering. "And when the Lord smelled the pleasing odour, the Lord said in his heart, 'I will never again curse the ground because of man, for the imagination of man's heart is evil from his youth; neither will I ever again destroy every living creature as I have done. While the earth remains, seed-time and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease'."[6] This article is about great floods. ... In the Book of Genesis, the mountains of Ararat are the place where Noahs ark comes to rest on dry earth. ...


Then God made a covenant: Noah and his descendants would henceforth be free to eat meat ("every moving thing that lives shall be food for you, and as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything"), and the animals would fear man; and in return, man was forbidden to eat "flesh with its life, that is, its blood." And God forbade murder, and gave a commandment: "Be fruitful and multiply, bring forth abundantly on the earth and multiply in it." And as a sign of His covenant, He set the rainbow in the sky, "the sign of the covenant which I have established between me and all flesh that is upon the earth."[7] A covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn promise to do or not do something specified. ...


After the Flood, "Noah was the first tiller of the soil. He planted a vineyard; and he drank of the wine, and became drunk, and lay uncovered in his tent." Noah's son Ham saw his father naked and informed his brothers, who covered Noah while averting their eyes. Noah awoke and cursed Ham's son Canaan with eternal slavery, while giving his blessing to Shem and Japheth: "Blessed by the Lord my God be Shem; and let Canaan be his slave. God enlarge Japheth, and let him dwell in the tents of Shem; and let Canaan be his slave."[8] The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini, depicting Ham (center) laughing at his father, while Shem and Japheth cover him. ... Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ...


Noah died 350 years after the Flood, at the age of 950,[9] the last of the immensely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from as much as 900 years to the 120 years of Moses within just a few generations. Another few generations later, lifespans were reported to be less than 100 years on average. According to the Bible, the only survivors from the antediluvian period were Noah and his family. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ...


Jewish perspectives

See also: Noah in Rabbinic Literature
The Sacrifice of Noah, Jacopo Bassano (c.1515-1592), Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten, Potsdam-Sanssouci, c. 1574.

The righteousness of Noah is the subject of much discussion among the rabbis.[10] The description of Noah as "righteous in his generation" implied to some that his perfection was only relative: In his generation of wicked people, he could be considered righteous, but in the generation of a tzadik like Abraham, he would not be considered so righteous. They point out that Noah did not pray to God on behalf of those about to be destroyed, as Abraham prayed for the wicked of Sodom and Gomorrah. In fact, Noah is never seen to speak; he simply listens to God and acts on his orders. This led such commentators to offer the figure of Noah as "the man in a fur coat," who ensured his own comfort while ignoring his neighbour. Others, such as the medieval commentator Rashi, held on the contrary that the building of the Ark was stretched over 120 years, deliberately in order to give sinners time to repent. Noah in rabbinic literature. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x634, 145 KB) Summary Jacopo Bassano, The Sacrifice of Noah, c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x634, 145 KB) Summary Jacopo Bassano, The Sacrifice of Noah, c. ... Jacopos The Last Supper Jacopo Bassano (also known as Giacomo da Ponte, c. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... This article is about the German palace. ... Tzadik - צדיק (plural: Tzadikkim) is the Hebrew word for righteous one, and is a title which is generally given to those whom are considered to be righteous such as a spiritual master or Rebbe. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sodom and Gomorrah (disambiguation). ... A 16th-century depiction of Rashi Note: For the astrological concept, see Rashi - the signs. ...


Christian perspectives

The Drunkenness of Noah, Michelangelo Buonarroti, ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, the Vatican, Rome, 1509. Michelangelo shows Noah drunk before his sons, and simultaneously, in the background, Noah planting his vineyard.

To the early Christians, the flood was a common analogy to the coming final judgment. In the gospel of Luke 17:26 Jesus is quoted as saying, “Just as it was in the days of Noah, so too it will be in the days of the Son of Man.” Therefore suggesting that the second coming would occur in much the same way as the flood, where a quick and unexpected separation between the saved and condemned would arise. Noah represented those who would be saved and those who drowned were those who did not believe. Image File history File links Michelangelo_drunken_Noah. ... Image File history File links Michelangelo_drunken_Noah. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... -1... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Noah is called a "preacher of righteousness" in 2 Peter 2:5, and the First Epistle of Peter equates the saving power of baptism with the Ark saving those who were in it. In later Christian thought, the Ark came to be equated with the Church: salvation was to be found only within Christ and his Lordship. St Augustine of Hippo (354-430), demonstrated in The City of God that the dimensions of the Ark corresponded to the dimensions of the human body, which corresponds to the body of Christ; the equation of Ark and Church is still found in the Anglican rite of baptism, which asks God, "who of thy great mercy didst save Noah," to receive into the Church the infant about to be baptised. In Christianity, the First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... St. ... The City of God, opening text, created c. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


Noah's three sons were generally interpreted in medieval Christianity as the founders of the populations of the three known continents, Japheth/Europe, Shem/Asia, and Ham/Africa, although a rarer variation held that they represented the three classes of medieval society - the priests (Shem), the warriors (Japheth), and the peasants (Ham). In the 18th and 19th centuries the view that Ham's sons in general had been literally "blackened" by sin came to provide a religious justification for slavery. Shem (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Greek: Σημ, SÄ“m ; Arabic:  ; Geez: Sham ; renown; prosperity; name) was one of the sons of Noah in the Bible. ... Slave redirects here. ...


Gnostic literature

The Apocryphon of John reports that the chief archon caused the flood because he desired to destroy the world he had made, but the First Thought informed Noah of the chief archon's plans, and Noah informed the remainder of humanity. Unlike the account of Genesis, not only are Noah's family saved, but many others also heed Noah's call. There is no ark in this account; instead Noah and the others hide in a "luminous cloud". The Secret Book of John (Apocryphon of John)[1] is a second-century Sethian gnostic text of secret teachings. ... For other uses, see Archon (disambiguation). ...


Islamic perspectives

Main article: Islamic view of Noah

Noah is a prophet in the Qur'an. References to نوح Nūḥ, the Arabic form of Noah, are scattered throughout the Qur'an, but no single narrative account of the entire Deluge is given. The references in the Qur'an are consistent with Genesis, and Islamic tradition generally follows the Genesis account, with one important exception: In the Bible, the deluge is a world-wide event, while in the Qur'an, it directs to a regional event, affecting only the "people of Noah". The Qur'an emphasizes Noah's preaching of the monotheism of God, and the ridicule heaped on him by idolators. Noah upon the instruction of God is said to have preached for many years, with only 83 people willing to submit to God, and that eventually brought the wrath of God on the unbelievers. Nuh is a prophet in the Quran. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ...


Below are some verses from Quran about Noah:

We sent Noah to his people: He said, “O my people! worship God! Ye have no other god but Him. Will ye not fear (Him)?”
The chiefs of the Unbelievers among his people said: “He is no more than a man like yourselves: his wish is to assert his superiority over you: if God had wished (to send messengers), He could have sent down angels; never did we hear such a thing (as he says), among our ancestors of old.”
(And some said): “He is only a man possessed: wait (and have patience) with him for a time.”
(Noah) said: “O my Lord! help me: for that they accuse me of falsehood!”

God later instructed Noah to build the ark:

Build the ship under Our eyes and by Our inspiration, and speak not unto Me on behalf of those who do wrong. Lo! they will be drowned.[11][12]

The Qur'anic account contains a detail not included in the Biblical account: a reference to another son who chose not to enter the ark:

And it sailed with them amid waves like mountains, and Noah cried unto his son - and he was standing aloof - O my son! Come ride with us, and be not with the disbelievers.
He said: I shall betake me to some mountain that will save me from the water. (Noah) said: This day there is none that saveth from the commandment of God save him on whom He hath had mercy. And the wave came in between them, so he was among the drowned.[13]

The Qur'anic account does not include several details of the Genesis account, including the account of Noah's drunkenness.


Contemporary academic perspectives

The Deluge, Gustave Doré, 1832-1883. From the Dore Illustrated Bible, 1865.
The Deluge, Gustave Doré, 1832-1883. From the Dore Illustrated Bible, 1865.

According to the documentary hypothesis, the first five books of the Bible, including Genesis, were collated during the 5th century BC from four main sources, which themselves date from no earlier than the 10th century BC. Two of these, the Jahwist, composed in the 10th century BC, and the Priestly source, from the late 7th century BC, make up the chapters of Genesis which concern Noah. The attempt by the 5th century editor to accommodate two independent and sometimes conflicting sources accounts for the confusion over such matters as how many pairs of animals Noah took, and how long the flood lasted. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x622, 422 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Noah ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x622, 422 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Noah ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... A relational diagram describing the various versions postulated by the biblical documentary hypothesis. ... The Jahwist, also referred to as the Jehovist, Yahwist, or simply as J, is one of the sources of the Torah postulated by the documentary hypothesis. ... The Priestly Source (P) is the most recent of the four sources of the Torah postulated by the documentary hypothesis. ...


More broadly, Genesis seems to contain two accounts concerning Noah, the first making him the hero of the Flood, the second representing him as a husbandman who planted a vineyard. This has led some scholars to believe that Noah was originally the inventor of wine, in keeping with the statement at Genesis 5:29 that Lamech "called his name Noah, saying, 'Out of the ground which the Lord has cursed this one shall bring us relief from our work and from the toil of our hands.'"[14]


The "Curse of Ham" has given rise to much discussion, but seems to express a hope on the part of the 6th century BC compilers of the Torah that the Medes (Japhet) would join with the Jews (Shem) in restoring Jewish rule in the land of Canaan: "Blessed by the Lord my God be Shem, and let Canaan be his slave. God enlarge Japheth, and let him dwell in the tents of Shem, and let Canaan be his slave."


Mythological connections

Noah's first burnt offering after the Flood - relief in Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc.
Noah's first burnt offering after the Flood - relief in Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc.

Noah's great grandfather Enoch is the beginning of a web of similarities between the story of Noah and older Mesopotamian myths. According to Genesis 5:24, at the end of his 365 years Enoch "walked with God, and was not, for God took him" - the only one of the ten pre-Flood Patriarchs not reported to have died. Where did Enoch go when God took him? In a late Apocryphal tradition, Methuselah is reported to have visited Enoch at the end of the Earth, where he dwelt with the angels, immortal. The details bring to mind Utnapishtim, a figure from the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh - the hero Gilgamesh, after long and arduous travel, finds Utnapishtim living in the paradise of Dilmun at the end of the Earth, where he has been granted eternal life by the gods. (Gilgamesh's reason for seeking out Utnapishtim, incidentally, is to learn the secret of immortality - like Methuselah, he comes close to the gift but fails to achieve it). Utnapishtim then tells how he survived a great flood, and how he was afterwards granted immortality by the gods. It has been suggested that the Flood story may originally have belonged to Enoch.[14] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1679x2860, 843 KB) en: Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc (Czech Republic) - one of reliefs in the inner chapel depicting Noahs first burnt offering after the Flood. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1679x2860, 843 KB) en: Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc (Czech Republic) - one of reliefs in the inner chapel depicting Noahs first burnt offering after the Flood. ... To the glory of God the Almighty, the Virgin Mary and the saints I will build a column that in its height and splendour will be unrivalled in any other town. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... Mesopotamian mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian mythologies from the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Iraq. ... In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Utnapishtim (also known as the Sumerian character Ziusudra) is the wise king of the Sumerian city state of Shuruppak who, along with his wife, whose name was not mentioned in the story, survived a great flood sent by Enlil to drown every living thing on... The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Babylonia and is among the earliest known literary works. ... Dilmun (sometimes transliterated Telmun) is associated with ancient sites on the islands of Bahrain in the Persian Gulf. ...


Lamech's statement that Noah will be named "rest" because "out of the ground which the Lord has cursed this one shall bring us relief from our work and from the toil of our hands," has another faint parallel in Babylonian mythology: the gods grew tired of working, digging the channels of the rivers, and so the god Enki created man from clay and blood and spit to do the work for them. Enki fell in love with his creation, and later warned Utnapishtim that the other gods planned to send a flood to destroy all life, and advised him on how to construct his ark. Enki (DEN.KI(G)) was a deity in Sumerian mythology, later known as Ea in Babylonian mythology, originally chief god of the city of Eridu. ... In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Utnapishtim (also known as the Sumerian character Ziusudra) is the wise king of the Sumerian city state of Shuruppak who, along with his wife, whose name was not mentioned in the story, survived a great flood sent by Enlil to drown every living thing on...


Noah is also often compared to Deucalion, the son of Prometheus and Pronoia in Greek mythology. Like Noah, Deucalion is a wine maker or wine seller; he is forewarned of the flood (this time by Zeus); he builds an ark and staffs it with creatures - and when he completes his voyage, gives thanks and takes advice from the Gods on how to repopulate the Earth. This and some other examples of apparent comparison between Greek myths and the "key characters" in the Old Testament/Torah have led recent Biblical scholars, particularly those commenting on the Documentary hypothesis to conclude a Hellenistic influence in the composition of the earlier portions of the Hebrew Bible. Deucalion In Greek mythology, Deucalion, or Deukálion (new-wine sailor) was the name of at least two figures: a son of Prometheus, and a son of Minos. ... Prometheus Brings Fire to Mankind, by Heinrich Füger, (1817). ... Pronoia (plural pronoiai, Greek for provisions) refers to a system of land grants in the Byzantine Empire. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... A relational diagram describing the various versions postulated by the biblical documentary hypothesis. ...


See also

The Bible is a compilation of various texts or books of different age. ... Patriarchal Age is the era of the times described in the Book of Genesis (Gen. ... For the entire 12-tablet Epic see Epic of Gilgamesh. ... The Rainbow is the ancient symbol of the Noahide Movement reminiscing the seven coloured rainbow that appeared after the Great Flood of the Bible. ... This T and O map, which abstracts that societys known world to a cross inscribed within an orb, remakes geography in the service of Christian iconography and identifies the three known continents as populated by descendents of Shem (Sem), Ham (Cham) and Japheth (Iafeth) The Table of Nations is...

Notes and references

  1. ^ http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Noah Meaning of Noah
  2. ^ Genesis 5:28-32
  3. ^ Genesis 6:19
  4. ^ Genesis 7:2
  5. ^ Genesis 7:24
  6. ^ Genesis 8:20-22
  7. ^ Genesis 9:1-17
  8. ^ Genesis 9:20-27
  9. ^ Genesis 9:28-29
  10. ^ JewishEncyclopedia.com - Noah.
  11. ^ (Surah Hud: 37).
  12. ^ (Surat al-Mumenoon: 23-26).
  13. ^ (Surah Hud: 42-43).
  14. ^ a b JewishEncyclopedia.com - NOAH.
  • Bailey, Lloyd R. (1989). Noah, the Person and the Story. South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press. ISBN 0-87249-637-6. 
  • Best, Robert M. (1999). Noah's Ark and the Ziusudra Epic. Fort Myers, Florida: Enlil Press. ISBN 0-9667840-1-4. 
  • Young, Davis A. (1995). The Biblical Flood: A Case Study of the Church's Response to Extrabiblical Evidence. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.. ISBN 0-85364-678-3. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Noah
Prophets of Islam in the Qur'an
Adam Idris Nuh Hud Saleh Ibrahim Lut Ismail Is'haq Yaqub Yusuf Ayoub
آدم إدريس نوح هود صالح إبراهيم لوط إسماعيل إسحاق يعقوب يوسف أيوب
Adam Enoch Noah Eber Shelah Abraham Lot Ishmael Isaac Jacob Joseph Job

Shoaib Musa Harun Dhul-Kifl Dawud Sulayman Ilyas Al-Yasa Yunus Zakariya Yahya Isa Muhammad
شُعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود سليمان إلياس إليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى مُحمد
Jethro Moses Aaron Ezekiel David Solomon Elijah Elisha Jonah Zechariah John Jesus Paraclete
v  d  e


Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... Idris (Arabic: إدريس ) is a Prophet in Islam. ... Nuh is a prophet in the Quran. ... Hud (Arabic هود) is a prophet in the Quran. ... Saleh (Arabic: صالح) is a prophet of Islam and is mentioned in the Quran. ... For information on the racehorse, see Ibrahim (horse) (Arabic: ), the biblical patriarch Abraham, is an important prophet in Islam, son of Azar, and the father of the Prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... Lut (circa 1781 BC - 1638 BC?[1] [2]), (Arabic: لوط ) was a prophet mentioned in the Quran and known as Lot in the Bible. ... In Islam, Ishmael is known as the first-born son of Abraham (Ibrahim in Arabic) from Hagar, and as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Yaqub (in Syriac: ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ) is a common Syriac and Arabic name. ... This is a sub-article to Joseph (Hebrew Bible). ... In Islam, Job is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Image File history File links Mosque. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... According to the Bible and the Quran, Lot (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: لوط, ; Hidden, covered[1]) was the nephew of the patriarch, Abraham or Abram. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... Shoaib (Arabic: ‎ ; also ShuÊ•ayb, ShuÊ•aib, Shuaib, literally Who Shows the Right Path), is traditionally associated with the biblical figure Jethro. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harun (Arabic: هارون ) was a prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Dhul-Kifl (Arabic ذو الكفل ) is considered by Muslims to be either a prophet of Islam or simply a righteous man mentioned in the Quran. ... In Islam, David is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Sulayman (Süleyman, Sulaiman, Suleyman, Suleiman) (Arabic: سليمان) is a prophet in the Quran, which assumes that he is King Solomon of the Bible. ... Ilyas is a prophet in the Quran. ... Al-Yasa is a prophet in the Quran. ... Yunus (Jonah) is one of the prophets of Islam whose story is recounted in the Quran. ... Zakariya (Arabic: زكريا), the New Testament priest Zechariah or Zacharias, is one of the prophets mentioned in the Quran. ... Isa redirects here. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Jethro (Hebrew: יִתְרוֹ, Standard Yitro Tiberian ; His Excellence/Posterity) is a figure from the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... This article is about the Biblical jhhhhnn . ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... For other uses, see Jonah (disambiguation). ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Paraclete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


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Noah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2959 words)
While the Deluge and Noah's Ark are the best-known element of the story of Noah, he is also mentioned as the "first husbandman" and the inventor of wine, as well as in connection with the somewhat mysterious episode of his drunkenness and the subsequent Curse of Ham.
The Drunkenness of Noah, Michelangelo Buonarroti, ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, the Vatican, Rome, 1509.
Noah's three sons were generally interpreted in medieval Christianity as the founders of the populations of the three known continents, Japheth/Europe, Shem/Asia, and Ham/Africa, although a rarer variation held that they represented the three classes of medieval society - the priests (Shem), the warriors (Japheth), and the peasants (Ham).
Noah's Ark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4774 words)
Noah was engaged both day and night in feeding and caring for the animals, and did not sleep for the entire year aboard the Ark. The animals were the best of their species, and so behaved with utmost goodness.
Noah (Nuh) is one of the five principal prophets of Islam, generally mentioned in connection with the fate of those who refuse to listen to the Word.
Noah left the Ark on the tenth day of Muharram, and he and his family and companions built a town at the foot of Mount Judi named, Thamanin ("eighty"), from their number.
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