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Encyclopedia > Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
Origin Long Beach, California,
United States
Genre(s) Jug band, folk, folk rock, bluegrass, country, country rock, pop
Years active 1966-present
Label(s) BGO, Liberty, EMI America, Capitol, United Artists, Warner Bros., Universal, MCA, CEMA, Javelin, Rising Tide, DreamWorks, Dualtone
Website http://www.nittygritty.com/
Members
Bob Carpenter
Jimmie Fadden
Jeff Hanna
John McEuen
Former members
Ralph Barr
Merel Bregante
Jackson Browne
John Cable
Jackie Clark
Chris Darrow
Michael Gardner
Al Garth
Richard Hathaway
Jimmy Ibbotson
Bruce Kunkel
Bernie Leadon
Vic Mastrianni
Les Thompson

The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band is an American country-folk-rock band that has existed in various forms since its founding in Long Beach, California in 1966. The group's membership has had at least a dozen iterations over the years, including a period between from 1976 to 1981 when the band performed and recorded as The Dirt Band. Constant members since the early days are Singer-guitarist Jimmie Fadden and drummer Jeff Hanna. Multi-instrumentalist John McEuen was with the band from 1966 to 1986 and returned in 2001. Keyboardist Bob Carpenter joined the band in 1977. Nitty (or Nitti) may refer to: Nitty (musician) a Pop-rap artist Frank Nitti, a mobster Antero Niittymäki, a hockey goalie Nitti (producer), a rapper and producer Francesco Saverio Nitti, an Italian economist and politician Nitty Gritty, a Reggae singer Francesco Fausto Nitti Nitty Gritty Dirt Band Category: ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles County Government  - Mayor Bob Foster Area  - City  65. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A jug band is a band employing a jug player and a mix of traditional and home-made instruments. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... BGO Records (Beat Goes On) is a record label specializing in classic rock, blues, jazz and folk music. ... Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in the United Kingdom and with operations in over 25 other countries. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... United Artists Records was a record label founded by United Artists soon after its own founding in 1919 to distribute soundtracks from its movies. ... Warner Bros. ... Universal Records is an American record label owned by Universal Music Group. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by MCA Inc. ... When David Geffen sold his Geffen Records to MCA Records he joined Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg to form Dreamworks SKG, with subsidiary DreamWorks Records. ... John McEuen (born December l9, l945 in Long Beach, California, ) is an American musician[1]. He was a founding member of The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, one of the most venerable and well-known folk-rock groups of all time. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles County Government  - Mayor Bob Foster Area  - City  65. ... // January 3 - Hullabaloo shows promotional videos of The Beatles songs Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out. January 8 - Shindig! airs for the last time on ABC, with musical guests the Kinks and the Who January 14 - Young singer David Jones changes his last name to Bowie to avoid... John McEuen (born December l9, l945 in Long Beach, California, ) is an American musician[1]. He was a founding member of The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, one of the most venerable and well-known folk-rock groups of all time. ...


The band's hits include a cover version of Jerry Jeff Walker's "Mr. Bojangles". Albums include 1972's Will the Circle Be Unbroken, featuring such traditional country artists Mother Maybelle Carter, Earl Scruggs, Roy Acuff, Merle Travis and Jimmy Martin. A follow-up album based on the same concept, Will the Circle Be Unbroken: Volume Two was released in 1989, was certified gold and won two Grammy Awards and was named Album of the Year at the Country Music Association Awards. // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Jerry Jeff Walker, 2002 Jerry Jeff Walker (born March 16, 1942) is a country music singer. ... Mr. ... Will the Circle Be Unbroken is a 1972 album by The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ... Maybelle Carter (May 10, 1909 – October 23, 1978) was an American Country music musician. ... Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ... Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... Merle Travis (November 29, 1917 - October 20, 1983) is an American country and western singer, songwriter, and musician. ... Bluegrass musician Jimmy Martin Jimmy Martin (August 10, 1927 – May 14, 2005) was an American bluegrass musician, known as the King of Bluegrass. Born James H. Martin in Sneedville, Tennessee, beginning in 1949 Martin was lead vocalist for Bill Monroes Bluegrass Boys,. Martins high voice mixed with Monroe... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Country Music Association Awards also known as the CMA Awards, are voted on by business members of the Country Music Association. ...

Contents

History

1966-1969

The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band was founded around 1966 in Long Beach California by singer-guitarist Jeff Hanna and washtub bass player Bruce Kunkel who performed as the New Coast Two. Trying to, in the words of the band's website, "figure out how not to have to work for a living," Hanna and Kunkel joined informal jam sessions at McCabe's Guitar Shop in Long Beach, California. There they met several multi-instrumentalists: guitarist-washboard bassist Ralph Barr, guitarist-clarinetist Les Thompson, harmonicist and jug player Jimmie Fadden and guitarist-vocalist Jackson Browne. As the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the six men started as a jug band and joined the burgeoning southern California folk rock, playing in local clubs, wearing pinstripe suits and cowboy boots. Electric Washtub Bass 4 string washtub bass The washtub bass, or gutbucket, is an American folk instrument that uses a metal washtub as a resonator. ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles County Government  - Mayor Bob Foster Area  - City  65. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... The jug as a musical instrument reached its height of popularity in the 1920s, when jug bands, such as Cannons Jug Stompers were popular. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... A jug band is a band employing a jug player and a mix of traditional and home-made instruments. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ...


Browne was only in the band for a few months before he left to concentrate on a solo career as a singer-songwriter. He was replaced by John McEuen on banjo, fiddle, mandolin and steel guitar. McEuen's older brother, William, was the group's manager, and he helped the band get signed with Liberty Records, which released the group's debut album, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1967. The band's first single, "Buy for Me the Rain," was a Top 40 hit, and the band gained exposure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson, as well as concerts with such disparate artists as Jack Benny and The Doors. The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... A Dobro style resonator guitar Steel guitar, strictly speaking, refers to a method of playing using a metal slide (or steel) on a guitar played horizontally, with the strings uppermost. ... Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ...


A second album, Ricochet was released later in the year and fared less successfully than their first. Kunkel wanted the band to "go electric", and exited the group in the dispute. He was replaced by guitarist-fiddler Chris Darrow (guitar, fiddle).


By 1968, the band went electric anyway, and added drums. The first electric album, Rare Junk, was a commercial flop, as was their next, Alive!.


The band continued to gain exposure, mainly as a novelty act, making a cameo appearance in the 1969 musical western film, Paint Your Wagon, performing, "Hand Me Down That Can o' Beans". The band also played Carnegie Hall as an opening act for Bill Cosby and played in a jam session with Dizzy Gillespie. A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin in a promo still for Paint Your Wagon. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ...


1969-1976

The group took a break in 1969, reforming in Aspen, Colorado with Jimmy Ibbotson replacing Chris Darrow. With William McEuen as producer and a renegotiated contract that gave the band more artistic freedom, the band recorded and released Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy, issued in 1970. Embracing a straight, traditional country and bluegrass sound, the album included the group's best-known single, a cover version of Jerry Jeff Walker's "Mr. Bojangles". The City of Aspen is a Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous city and the county seat of Pitkin County, Colorado, United States. ... Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy is the 1970 album from The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band that contains the hit song Mr. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Jerry Jeff Walker, 2002 Jerry Jeff Walker (born March 16, 1942) is a country music singer. ... Mr. ...


The next album, All The Good Times, released in early 1972, was similar in feel.


The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band next sought to solidify its reputation as a country band, heading for Nashville, Tennessee and recording the triple album, Will the Circle Be Unbroken with Nashville stalwarts Roy Acuff, Earl Scruggs and Jimmy Martin, country pioneer Mother Maybelle Carter, folk-blues guitarist Doc Watson and others. The title is taken from the song, "Can the Circle Be Unbroken (Bye and Bye)", as adapted by A. P. Carter, and reflects the album's theme of trying to tie together two generations of musicians: long-haired boys from California and older veterans of the middle American establishment. The track, "I Saw the Light" with Acuff singing, was a hit, and the album received two nominations for Grammy Award. Veteran fiddler Vassar Clements was introduced to a wider audience by the album. The band also toured Japan. “Nashville” redirects here. ... Will the Circle Be Unbroken is a 1972 album by The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ... Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ... Bluegrass musician Jimmy Martin Jimmy Martin (August 10, 1927 – May 14, 2005) was an American bluegrass musician, known as the King of Bluegrass. Born James H. Martin in Sneedville, Tennessee, beginning in 1949 Martin was lead vocalist for Bill Monroes Bluegrass Boys,. Martins high voice mixed with Monroe... Maybelle Carter (May 10, 1909 – October 23, 1978) was an American Country music musician. ... Doc Watson Merle Watson, c. ... Can the Circle Be Unbroken (Bye and Bye) (Cover versions usually title it Will the Circle be Unbroken) is a well-known country/folk song by Ada R. Habershon. ... A.P. Carter (December 15, 1891 - November 7, 1960) was an American Country music musician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... I Saw the Light may refer to: I Saw the Light, a song written and originally performed by Hank Williams I Saw the Light, a song by Todd Rundgren I Saw the Light, a song performed by Wynonna Judd I Saw the Light, an album by Hal Ketchum I Saw... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cover of Old and in the Way (1975) Vassar Clements (April 25, 1928-August 16, 2005) was an American fiddle player. ...


Les Thompson left the group, making the band a foursome. The next album, Stars & Stripes Forever, was a live album that mixed old hits such as "Buy for Me the Rain" and "Mr. Bojangles" with Circle collaborations (fiddler Vassar Clements was a guest performer) and long storytelling spoken-word monologues. A studio album, Dream, was also released. Cover of Old and in the Way (1975) Vassar Clements (April 25, 1928-August 16, 2005) was an American fiddle player. ...


In July 1974, the band was among the headline acts at the Ozark Music Festival at the Missouri State Fairgrounds in Sedalia, Missouri. Some estimates have put the crowd count at 350,000 people, which would make this one of the largest music events in history. At another concert, the band opened for the rock band Aerosmith. The Ozark Music Festival, (1974) No Hassles Guaranteed was the motto of the music festival to be held on the Missouri State Fairgrounds, in July 1974. ... The Missouri State Fair is the state fair for Missouri which has operated continuosuly since 1901 in Sedalia, Missouri. ... Sedalia is a city located in Pettis County, Missouri, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 50 and U.S. Highway 65. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ...


1976-1981: The Dirt Band

Jimmy Ibbotson left the band at the end of 1975, leaving Fadden, Hanna and McEuen. John Cable and Jackie Clark were brought in on guitar and bass. The band shortened its name around this time to The Dirt Band, and released its first greatest hits compilation, Dirt, Silver & Gold, in 1976.


The Dirt Band was the first American group allowed by the Soviet Union to tour Russia, playing concerts and a televised appearance that is estimated to hve been watched by 145 million people.


Pianist Bob Carpenter joined in 1977, and the group's sound became more pop and rock oriented. Saxophonist Al Garth, drummer Merel Bregante and bassist Richard Hathaway were also added. Jeff Hanna became the group's producer. For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ...


Albums during this period included The Dirt Band and An American Dream. The single "American Dream" with Linda Ronstadt reached No. 13 on the pop charts. The band also appeared on "Saturday Night Live", and, billed as The Toot Uncommons, provided backing for Steve Martin on his million-selling novelty tune, "King Tut." Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... This article is about the American television series. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... King Tut is a 1978 novelty song performed by Steve Martin and the Toot Uncommons (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band). ...


The albums Make a Little Magic and Jealousy were released in 1980 and 1981, with the single "Make a Little Magic" featuring Nicolette Larson reaching the Top 20 on the pop chart. Nicolette Larson (July 17, 1952 - December 16, 1997) was a singer best known for Lotta Love, which peaked at #8 on Billboard Magazines Hot 100 chart in 1978. ...


1982-1989: Nitty Gritty again

The band returned to its original name and it country roots, with Jimmy Ibbotson rejoining for recording session in Nashville, Tennessee for the album Let's Go, which yielded the hit "Dance Little Jean" which was a Top 10 country hit. The next album, 1984's Plain Dirt Fashion had the band's first No. 1 hit, "Long Hard Road". “Nashville” redirects here. ...


There were two more No. 1's: "Modern Day Romance" (1985) and "Fishin' in the Dark" (1987). Other successful songs were "Dance Little Jean" (1983); "I Love Only You" (1984); "High Horse" (1985); "Home Again in My Heart," "Partners, Brothers and Friends" and "Stand a Little Rain" (1986); "Fire in the Sky," "Baby's Got a Hold on Me" and "Oh What a Love" (1987); "Working Man (Nowhere to Go)" and "I've Been Lookin'" (1988); and "Down That Road Tonight" and "When it's Gone" (1989). Fishin in the Dark is a hit single by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ...


Performances included the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games and the inaugural Farm Aid concert in Champaign, Illinois. A 20-year anniversary concert at McNichols Sports Arena in Denver, Colorado featured such guests as Ricky Skaggs, Emmylou Harris, Doc Watson and John Prine. Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Farm Aid started as a benefit concert on September 22, 1985, in Champaign, Illinois, held to raise money for family farmers in the United States. ... Champaign is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. ... McNichols Sports Arena (AKA Big Mac) was an indoor arena in Denver, Colorado, USA, adjacent to Mile High Stadium. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... Doc Watson Merle Watson, c. ... John Prine (born October 10, 1946, in Maywood, Illinois) is an American country/folk singer-songwriter who has achieved widespread critical (and some commercial) success since the early 1970s. ...


John McEuen left the band at the end of 1986, replaced by Bernie Leadon, formerly of the Eagles. He was with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1987 and 1988. The band's 19th album, Hold On featured the No. 1 singles "Fishin' in the Dark" and "Baby's Got a Hold on Me." The band appeared on the "Today Show" and the "Tonight Show" in the same week, and toured Europe. Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ... The Eagles redirects here. ... The Today Show (officially called Today) is currently, a long-running morning news show airing on the NBC television network in the United States. ... The First Lady of the United States, Laura Bush and current host Jay Leno. ...


In 1989, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band again returned to Nashville, to record Will the Circle Be Unbroken: Volume Two. Returnees from the first Circle included Earl Scruggs, Vassar Clements and Roy Acuff. Johnny Cash and the Carter Family, Emmylou Harris and Ricky Skaggs joined the sessions, as did John Prine, Levon Helm, John Denver, John Hiatt, Bruce Hornsby and former Byrds Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman. This album won two Grammy Awards and was named Album of the Year at the Country Music Association Awards for Best Country Vocal Performance (duo or group) and the Country Music Association's Album of the Year Award in 1989. Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ... Cover of Old and in the Way (1975) Vassar Clements (April 25, 1928-August 16, 2005) was an American fiddle player. ... Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... John Prine (born October 10, 1946, in Maywood, Illinois) is an American country/folk singer-songwriter who has achieved widespread critical (and some commercial) success since the early 1970s. ... Mark Lavon Helm (born May 26, 1940), better know as Levon Helm, is an American rock musician most famous as the drummer for the rock group The Band. ... John Denver (December 31, 1943 â€“ October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... John Hiatt (born August 20, 1952 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American rock guitarist, pianist, singer, and songwriter. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Country Music Association Awards also known as the CMA Awards, are voted on by business members of the Country Music Association. ...


1990-2000

As a foursome of Hanna, Fadden, Ibbotson and Carpenter, the band again toured the Soviet Union, as well as Canada, Europe, and Japan. A 25th anniversary concert was recorded on Live Two Five in Red Deer, Alberta, produced by T-Bone Burnett. For other uses, see Red Deer. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ...


In 1992, the band collaborated with Irish folk music's The Chieftains for the Grammy Award-winning Another Country. Other efforts included the album Acoustic, spotlighting their "wooden" sound, a duet with Karla Bonoff, "You Believed in Me" for the MCA Olympic compilation, One Voice, and a cover version of Buddy Holly's "Maybe Baby" for the Decca tribute album, Not Fade Away. The Christmas Album was released in 1997, followed by Bang! Bang! Bang! in 1999. The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Karla Bonoff (born December 27, 1951) is an American singer/songwriter. ... For the Weezer song, see Buddy Holly (song). ...


The band briefly entered the pop culture again in April of 1992, when they were the unwitting subject of one of George H. W. Bush's malapropisms, referring to the group as the "Nitty Ditty Nitty Gritty Great Bird" at a country music awards ceremony in Nashville: George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ...

"I said to them there's another one that the Nitty Ditty Nitty Gritty Great Bird and it says if you want to see a rainbow you've got to stand a little rain."[1]

This unusual phrasing was repeatedly used as an example of Bush's garbled syntax (notably, in Dave Barry's book Dave Barry Hits Below the Beltway), which in turn led to increased visibility for the band. For other uses, see Syntax (disambiguation). ... For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ...


Recent works

John McEuen rejoined the band in 2001. In 2002, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band celebrated the 30th anniversary of their landmark Will the Circle Be Unbroken with a remastered CD reissue of the 1972 album and a new compilation, Will the Circle Be Unbroken: Volume III. An album of all-new material, Welcome to Woody Creek, was released in 2004. Jimmy Ibbotson again left the band in 2004. Will the Circle Be Unbroken is a 1972 album by The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ...


In 2005 the band donated use of the song "Soldier's Joy" for the benefit album, Too Many Years to benefit Clear Path International's work with landmine survivors. Also in 2005, the band was recognized by the International Entertainment Buyers Association for 40 years of contributions to the music industry. Clear Path International (CPI) is a non-profit organization based in the United States. ...


Discography

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band time line
May-August
1966
1966-1967
1967-1968
1969-1973
1974-1975
1976-1977
As The
Dirt Band
1977-1979
As The
Dirt Band
1980–1981
As The
Dirt Band
1982-1986
1987-1988
1989-2000
2001-2004
2005-2007
  • 1967 The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band (Liberty Records)
  • 1967 Ricochet (Liberty Records)
  • 1968 Pure Dirt (Liberty Records)
  • 1968 Rare Junk (Liberty Records)
  • 1969 Alive (Liberty Records)
  • 1970 Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy (Liberty Records)
  • 1971 All The Good Times (United Artist Records)
  • 1972 Will the Circle Be Unbroken (United Artist Records)
  • 1974 Stars & Stripes Forever (United Artist Records)
  • 1975 Symphonion Dream (United Artist Records)
  • 1978 The Dirt Band (United Artist Records)
  • 1979 An American Dream (United Artist Records)
  • 1980 Gold from Dirt
  • 1980 Make a Little Magic (United Artist Records)
  • 1981 Jealousy (Liberty Records)
  • 1982 Let's Go (Liberty Records)
  • 1984 Plain Dirt Fashion (Warner Brothers Records)
  • 1985 Partners, Brothers and Friends (Warner Brothers Records)
  • 1987 Hold On (Warner Brothers Records)
  • 1988 Workin' Band (Warner Brothers Records)
  • 1989 Will the Circle Be Unbroken: Volume Two (Universal Records)
  • 1991 The Rest of the Dream (MCA Records)
  • 1991 Live Two Five (Capitol Records)
  • 1992 Not Fade Away (Liberty Records)
  • 1992 The Real Nitty Gritty
  • 1994 Acoustic (Liberty Records)
  • 1994 Nitty Gritty Dirt Band-Roger McGuinn Live
  • 1997 The Christmas Album (Originally released on Rising Tide Records, now on MCA Records)
  • 1998 Bang Bang Bang (Dreamworks Records)
  • 2002 Will the Circle Be Unbroken: Volume Three (Capitol Records)
  • 2004 Welcome to Woody Creek (Dualtone Records)

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Electric Washtub Bass 4 string washtub bass The washtub bass, or gutbucket, is an American folk instrument that uses a metal washtub as a resonator. ... The jug as a musical instrument reached its height of popularity in the 1920s, when jug bands, such as Cannons Jug Stompers were popular. ... Two soprano clarinets: a B♭ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... For the visual effects technology, see ZOO Digital Group. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Electric Washtub Bass 4 string washtub bass The washtub bass, or gutbucket, is an American folk instrument that uses a metal washtub as a resonator. ... Two soprano clarinets: a B♭ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... For the visual effects technology, see ZOO Digital Group. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Electric Washtub Bass 4 string washtub bass The washtub bass, or gutbucket, is an American folk instrument that uses a metal washtub as a resonator. ... The jug as a musical instrument reached its height of popularity in the 1920s, when jug bands, such as Cannons Jug Stompers were popular. ... Two soprano clarinets: a B♭ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A washboard is a tool designed for hand washing clothing. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... Uncle Charlie & His Dog Teddy is the 1970 album from The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band that contains the hit song Mr. ... Will the Circle Be Unbroken is a 1972 album by The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ... Symphonion Dream is the 1975 album from The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. ... Hold On is the name of an album by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band[1] which was released on July 7, 1987[2] by the record label Warner Bros. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.stevelukather.net/Session.aspx?id=377

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - Pandora Internet Radio (1363 words)
The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's beginnings lay with the New Coast Two, a folk duo consisting of Jeff Hanna (guitar, vocals) and Bruce Kunkel (guitar, washtub bass), formed while both were in high school in the early '60s.
The band had, by now, eclipsed the competition as a "crossover" act, reaching country and bluegrass audiences even as their rock listeners acquired a new appreciation for musicians such as Acuff and Carter.
By this time, the Dirt Band was working in their field alongside any number of country/bluegrass crossover artists whose career paths were made easier by that first record, including John Hiatt, Mary Chapin Carpenter, and Rosanne Cash.
In Music We Trust - Nitty Gritty Dirt Band: Will The Circle Be Unbroken (218 words)
Thirty years ago the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band had the nerve to ask their hero Earl Scruggs if he'd play with them.
United Artists President Mike Stewart wasn't sure the album would sell one copy, but seeing as how the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band was so gung ho about the album, he approved them for a budget of $22,000.
A two-disc set of some of the best country you're likely to hear, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and friends take on the country songs that made country, playing it with pride, lively and soulful, from the warm bluegrass soaked harmonies to the gritty, country stomp.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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