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Encyclopedia > Nisibis
The newly excavated Church of Saint Jacob in Nisibis.

Nisibis (Nisibia, Nisibin, modern Nusaybin, Mardin Province, south-eastern Turkey 37°04′N 41°13′E) is the ancient Mesopotamian city, which Alexander's successors refounded as Antiochia Mygdonia (Greek: Αντιόχεια της Μυγδονίας) and is mentioned for the first time in Polybius' description of the march of Antiochus I against the Molon (Polybius, V, 51). Greek historian Plutarch suggested that the city was populated by Spartan descendants. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2144x1232, 2000 KB) Summary Photograph by Gareth Hughes of the Church of Saint Jacob (`Idto d-Mor Y`aqub) in Nisibis. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2144x1232, 2000 KB) Summary Photograph by Gareth Hughes of the Church of Saint Jacob (`Idto d-Mor Y`aqub) in Nisibis. ... Jacobs tomb in the crypt of his church in Nisibis. ... Nusaybin, formerly Nisibin, is a town in Turkey. ... Map showing the location of Mardin Province of Turkey View from Mardin to the Mesopotamian plains The old town of Midyat, second city of the province Mardin Province is a province of Turkey with a population of 835,173 (2000)¹. The capital of the Mardin Province is Mardin. ... It has been suggested that History of Ancient Mesopotamia be merged into this article or section. ... Polybius (ca 203 BC - 120 BC, Greek Πολυβιος) was a Greek historian of the Mediterranean world famous for his book called The Histories or The Rise of the Roman Empire, covering the period of 220 BC to 146 BC. // Personal experiences As the former tutor of Scipio Aemilianus , the famous adopted... Silver coin of Antiochus I Antiochus I Soter ( 324/323_262/261 BC reigned 281 BC - 261 BC) was half Persian, his mother Apame being one of those eastern princesses whom Alexander had given as wives to his generals in 324 BC. On the assassination of his father Seleucus I in... Molon (in Greek Moλων; died in 220 BC) was a general of the Seleucid king Antiochus the Great (223–187 BC). ... Polybius (ca 203 BC - 120 BC, Greek Πολυβιος) was a Greek historian of the Mediterranean world famous for his book called The Histories or The Rise of the Roman Empire, covering the period of 220 BC to 146 BC. // Personal experiences As the former tutor of Scipio Aemilianus , the famous adopted... Plutarch Mestrius Plutarchus (c. ... Sparta (Doric: Σπάρτα, Attic: Σπάρτη) is a city in southern Greece. ...


Like many other cities in the marches where Roman and Parthian powers confronted one another, Nisibis was often taken and retaken: it was captured by Lucullus after a long siege from the brother of Tigranes (Dion Cassius, xxxv, 6, 7); and captured again by Trajan in 115, for which he gained the name of Parthicus (ibid., LXVIII, 23), then lost and regained against the Jews during the Kitos War. Lost in 194, it was again conquered by Septimius Severus, who made it his headquarters and re-established a colony there (ibid., LXXV, 23). With the fresh energy of the new Sassanid dynasty, Shapur I conquered Nisibis, was driven out, and returned in the 260s. In 297, by a treaty with Narseh, the province of Nisibis was acquired by the Roman Empire; in 363 it was ceded back to the Persians on the defeat of Julian. The Roman historian of the 4th century Ammianus Marcellinus gained his first practical experience of warfare as a young man under the governor at Nisibis, Ursicinus. From 360 to 5th century, Nisibis was the camp of Legio I Parthica. Mark or march (or various plural forms of these words) are derived from the Frankish word marka (boundary) and refer to an area along a border, e. ... Octavian, widely known as Augustus, founder of the Roman empire The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... Parthia[1] (Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân), situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as the modern countries of Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf coast of Saudi Arabia, Bahrain... Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c. ... This article is about a king of Armenia in the first century B.C. For other historical figures with the same name (including other kings of Armenia) see Tigranes Coin of Tigranes II Tigranes the Great (ruled 95-56 BC) (also called Tigranes II and sometimes Tigranes I) was a... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (155–after 229), known in English as Dio Cassius or Cassius Dio, was a noted Roman historian and public servant. ... Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53 – August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98-117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Events Roman Empire Trajan was cut off in southern Mesopotamia after his invasion of that region and captures of the Parthian capital Ctesiphon. ... The Kitos War (115—117) is the name given to the second of the Jewish-Roman wars. ... Events Roman Empire Pescennius Niger, competitor of Septimius Severus for the Roman Empire, is defeated in three successive battles at Battle of Cyzicus, Battle of Nicaea and Battle of Issus, and killed outside Antioch by Severus troops. ... Lucius Septimius Severus, (April 11, 146-February 4, 211) was Roman emperor from April 9, 193 to 211. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... A coin of Shapur I. Shapur I, son of Ardashir I (226–241), was King of Persia from 241 to 272. ... Events Narseh of Persia and Diocletian conclude a peace treaty between Persia and Rome. ... Narseh (also known as Narses, Narseus) was king of Persia (292 - 303), and son of Shapur I. He rose as pretender to the throne against his grand-nephew Bahram III in AD 292, and soon became sole king. ... Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Flavius Claudius Iulianus, also known as Julian the Philosopher, was the last pagan Roman Emperor. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Ammianus Marcellinus is a Roman historian who wrote during Late Antiquity. ... Ursicinus, also known as Ursinus was elected pope in a violently contested election in 366 as a rival to Pope Damasus I, ruled in Rome for several months in 366 – 367, was afterwards declared the antipope, and died after 381. ... For other uses, see number 360. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 - 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Legio I Parthica, as well as II and III Parthica, were Roman legions levied in 197 by the emperor Lucius Septimius Severus, for the campaigns against Parthia. ...


Nisibis had a Christian bishop from 300, founded by Babu (died 309). War was begun again by Shapur II in 337, who besieged the city in 338, 346 and 350, when James, Babu's successor, was its bishop. Nisibis was the home of Ephrem the Syrian, who remained until its surrender to the Persians by Jovian in 363. A Christian is a follower of Jesus, whom they regard as a/the Christ. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Events Romano-Celtic temple-mausoleum complex is constructed in Lullingstone, and also in Anderida (approximate date). ... In Egyptian mythology, Beb (also Bebti, Baba, Babu) is the first-born son of Osiris according to the Book of the Dead. ... Events The Spanish provinces revolt from the control of Maxentius, acknowledging Constantine as their Emperor Pope Marcellus I is banished from Rome, as is his successor Eusebius later that year Shapur II becomes king of Persia. ... Shapur II was king of Persia (310 - 379). ... Events February 6 - Julius is elected pope. ... Events Eusebius of Nicomedia becomes Patriarch of Constantinople after Paul I is banished. ... Events Athanasius is restored as Patriarch of Alexandria. ... Events January 18 - Magnentius proclaimed Emperor by the army in Autun. ... Ephrem the Syrian (Syriac: , ;Greek: ; Latin: Ephraem Syrus; 306–373) was a deacon, prolific Syriac language hymn writer and theologian of the 4th century. ... This siliqua of Jovian, ca 363, celebrates his fifth year of reign, as a good omen. ... Events Perisapora is destroyed by Emperor Julian. ...

The interior of the Church of Saint Jacob in Nisibis.
The interior of the Church of Saint Jacob in Nisibis.

Later, the bishop of Nisibis was the ecclesiastic metropolitan of the Province of Beit-Arbaye. In 410 it had six suffragan sees and as early as the middle of the 5th century was the most important episcopal see of the Persian Church after Seleucia-Ctesiphon, and many of its Nestorian or Jacobite bishops were renowned for their writings: Barsumas, Osee, Narses, Jesusyab, Ebed-Jesus. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2144x1232, 1398 KB) Summary Photograph by Gareth Hughes of the interior of the Church of Saint Jacob (`Idto d-Mor Y`aqub) in Nisibis. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2144x1232, 1398 KB) Summary Photograph by Gareth Hughes of the interior of the Church of Saint Jacob (`Idto d-Mor Y`aqub) in Nisibis. ... Jacobs tomb in the crypt of his church in Nisibis. ... Events Alaric I deposes Priscus Attalus as Roman Emperor. ... The name Seleucia may denote any one of several cities in the Seleucid Empire. ... Ctesiphon, 1932 Ctesiphon (Parthian: Tyspwn as well as Tisfun) is one of the great cities of ancient Mesopotamia and the capital of the Parthian Empire and its successor, the Sassanid Empire, for more than 800 years located in the ancient Iranian province of Khvarvaran. ... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ...


The first theological school of Nisibis, founded at the introduction of Christianity into the city, was closed when the province was ceded to the Persians. Ephrem the Syrian, a poet, commentator, preacher and defender of orthodoxy, joined the general exodus of Christians and reestablished the school on more securely Roman soil at Edessa. In the 5th century the school became a center of Nestorian Christianity, and was closed down by Archbishop Cyrus in 489; the expelled masters and pupils withdrew once more to Nisibis, under the care of Barsumas, who had been trained at Edessa, under the patronage of Narses, who established the statutes of the new school. Those which have been discovered and published belong to Osee, the successor of Barsumas in the See of Nisibis, and bear the date 496; they must be substantially the same as those of 489. In 590 they were again modified. The monastery school was under a superior called Rabban ("master"), a title also given to the instructors. The administration was confided to a majordomo, who was steward, prefect of discipline, and librarian, but under the supervision of a council. Unlike the Jacobite schools, devoted chiefly to profane studies, the school of Nisibis was above all a school of theology. The two chief masters were the instructors in reading and in the interpretation of Holy Scripture, explained chiefly with the aid of Theodore of Mopsuestia. The free course of studies lasted three years, the students providing for their own support. During their sojourn at the university, masters and students led a monastic life under somewhat special conditions. The school had a tribunal and enjoyed the right of acquiring all sorts of property. Its rich library possessed a most beautiful collection of Nestorian works; from its remains Ebed-Jesus, Bishop of Nisibis in the 14th century, composed his celebrated catalogue of ecclesiastical writers. The disorders and dissensions, which arose in the sixth century in the school of Nisibis, favoured the development of its rivals, especially that of Seleucia; however, it did not really begin to decline until after the foundation of the School of Baghdad (832). Among its literary celebrities mention should be made of its founder Narses; Abraham, his nephew and successor; Abraham of Kashgar, the restorer of monastic life; John; Babai the Elder. Ephrem the Syrian (Syriac: , ;Greek: ; Latin: Ephraem Syrus; 306–373) was a deacon, prolific Syriac language hymn writer and theologian of the 4th century. ... Edessa is the historical name of a town in northern Mesopotamia. ... The Assyrian Church of the East is a church that traces its origins to the See of Babylon, said to be founded by Saint Thomas the Apostle. ... Events Theoderic, king of the Italy with the approval of the eastern emperor Zeno. ... Events Battle of Tolbiac; Clovis I defeats the Alamanni accepts Catholic baptism at Reims. ... Events September 3 - St. ... Theodore (c. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: ‎ translit: , Kurdish: Bexda, from Persian Baagh-daad or Bag-Da-Du meaning “Garden of God” [1]) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Events Theophilus forbids the usage of icons, establishing strict punishments. ...


Nisibis remains the site of two titular sees in the Roman Catholic Church, Nisibenus Chaldaeorum, and Nisibenus; the first seat is held by Jacques Ishaq, titular Archbishop, the second has been vacant since 1968. [1][2] When first appointed auxiliary bishop of the Diocese of Honolulu in Hawaii, Joseph Anthony Ferrario became a titular bishop of the titular see of the ancient Egyptian city of Cusae. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


See also Severus of Antioch and Paul of Nisibis Severus, patriarch of Antioch (AD 512 - 519), a native of Sozopolis in Pisidia, by birth and education a pagan, baptized in the martyry of Leontius at Tripolis (Evagr. ...


External link


Shows the Location of Mardin province Districts of Mardin Flag of Turkey

Mardin | Dargeçit | Derik | Kızıltepe | Mazıdağı | Midyat | Nusaybin | Ömerli | Savur | Yeşilli Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Map showing the location of Mardin Province of Turkey View from Mardin to the Mesopotamian plains The old town of Midyat, second city of the province Mardin Province is a province of Turkey with a population of 835,173 (2000)¹. The capital of the Mardin Province is Mardin. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Buildings in an older section of Mardin Mardin is a city in southeastern Turkey. ... Dargeçit is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Derik is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Kızıltepe is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Mazıdağı is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Midyat is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Nusaybin, formerly Nisibin, is a town in Turkey. ... Ömerli is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... Savur is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ... YeÅŸilli is a district of Mardin Province of Turkey. ...



 
 

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