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Encyclopedia > Nintendo 64
Nintendo 64
Manufacturer Nintendo
Type Video game console
Generation Fifth generation (64-bit era)
First available JP June 23, 1996[1]
NA September 29, 1996[1]
PAL March 1, 1997[1]
CPU 93.75 MHz NEC VR4300
GPU SGI 62.5 MHz 64-bit RCP
Media ROM cartridge
System storage Cartridge battery, Controller Pak
Controller input Up to 4 Nintendo 64 controllers
Online service RANDnetDD (Japan only)
Units sold Worldwide: 32.9 million (as of March 31, 2006)[2][3]
Best-selling game Super Mario 64, 11 million (as of May 21, 2003)[4]
Predecessor Super Nintendo Entertainment System
Successor Nintendo GameCube

The Nintendo 64 (ニンテンドウ六四 Nintendō Rokuyon?, NINTENDO64), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendo's third home video game console for the international market. Named for its 64-bit processor, it was released on June 23, 1996 in Japan, September 29, 1996 in North America, March 1, 1997 in Europe and Australia, September 1, 1997 in France and December 10, 1997 in Brazil. It is notable for being Nintendo's last home console to use cartridges to store games (with Nintendo switching to a proprietary optical format for the GameCube), and for being the first modern home console to come with a controller featuring an analog stick. Image File history File links Nintendo_64_Logo. ... Picture I took of my N64 Released under the GFDL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A console manufacturer is a company that manufactures and distributes video game consoles. ... Nintendo Company Ltd. ... Game console redirects here. ... Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... North American redirects here. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... CPU redirects here. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ... NEC Corporation (Jp. ... GPU redirects here. ... IBM PCjr; two ROM cartridge slots are below the floppy drives. ... For other uses, see Battery. ... Standard Controller Pak, rear view. ... The Controllers are a fictional extraterrestrial race existing in the DC Universe. ... The Nintendo 64DD (DD being short for Disk Drive) is an expansion system for the Nintendo 64. ... This is a list of video game consoles and handheld game consoles that have sold or shipped at least one million units. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more, including the top ten best-selling franchises. ... For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Nintendo GameCube ), often abbreviated as GCN, is Nintendos fourth home video game console and is part of the sixth generation era. ... Nintendo Company Ltd. ... Game console redirects here. ... In computing, a 64-bit component is one in which data are processed or stored in 64-bit units (words). ... CPU redirects here. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... North American redirects here. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


The N64 was released with two launch games, Super Mario 64 and Pilotwings 64, plus an extra one in Japan, Saikyō Habu Shōgi. The N64's suggested retail price was US$199 at its launch and it was later marketed with the slogan: "Get N, or get Out!" As of March 31, 2006, the N64 has sold 32.9 million units worldwide.[2][3] Super Mario Brothers was a launch title for the NES. A launch title is a video game that has been made available to consumers synchronously with its respective video game console, meaning they are the only available games at the time of the consoles launch. ... For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... Pilotwings 64 is a video game for the Nintendo 64, released in 1996, along with the launch of the console. ... Saikyō Habu Shōgi ) is a Japanese board game simulation for the Nintendo 64. ... The (manufacturers) suggested retail price (MSRP or SRP), list price or recommended retail price (RRP) (originally, Monroney suggested retail price) of a product is the price the manufacturer recommends that the retailer sell it for. ... USD redirects here. ... For the Bob Marley song, see Slogans (song). ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The "Ultra 64" logo from Cruis'n USA.

The Nintendo 64 was the culmination of work by Nintendo, Silicon Graphics (SGI), and MIPS Technologies. The SGI-based system design that ended up in the Nintendo 64 was originally offered to Tom Kalinske, then CEO of Sega of America by James H. Clark, founder of Silicon Graphics. SGI had recently bought out MIPS Technologies and the two companies had worked together to create a low-cost CPU/3D GPU combo that they thought would be ideal for the console market. A hardware team from Sega of Japan was sent to evaluate the chip's capabilities and they found faults which MIPS subsequently solved. However, Sega of Japan ultimately decided against SGI's design.[5] In the early stages of development, the Nintendo 64 was referred to by the code name "Project Reality".[6] This moniker came from the speculation within Nintendo that the console could produce CGI on par with then-current supercomputers. In 1994, the console was given the name Nintendo Ultra 64 in the West. The console's design was shown for the first time in late Spring 1994. The first picture of the console ever shown featured the Nintendo Ultra 64 logo and showed a game cartridge, but no controller. The final console was identical to this, but with a different logo. When the system together with the controller was fully unveiled in a playable form to the public on November 24, 1995, the console was introduced as the "Nintendo 64" in Japan, contrary to speculation of it being called "Ultra Famicom",[7] at the 7th Annual Shoshinkai Software Exhibition in Japan. Photos of the event were disseminated on the web by Game Zero magazine two days later.[8] Official coverage by Nintendo followed later via the Nintendo Power website and print magazine. In February 1995 Nintendo of America announced a delay of Nintendo Ultra 64 until September 1996 in North America. Simultaneously it was announced that Nintendo had adopted a new global branding strategy, calling the console Nintendo 64 everywhere. Subsequently the PAL introduction was further delayed, finally being released in Europe on March 1, 1997.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 35 KB) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 35 KB) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... Cruisn USA is racing game released in 1994 at the arcades developed by Midway Games and Nintendo. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ... MIPS Technologies, formerly MIPS Computer Systems, is most widely known for developing the MIPS architecture and a series of pioneering RISC CPUs. ... Thomas Tom Kalinske is an American businessman, best known as the president and CEO of Sega of America from 1990 to 1996. ... Chief Executive redirects here. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... For other uses, see Supercomputer (disambiguation). ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Software redirects here. ... The 2006 LinuxWorld trade show at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center. ... Game Zero Magazine was a U.S. based video game magazine published from 1992 to 1998 (although primary publication stopped in 1996). ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


During this stage of development two companies, Rareware (UK) and Midway (USA), created the arcade games Killer Instinct and Cruis'n USA which claimed to use the Ultra 64 hardware. In fact, the hardware had very little in common with what was finally released; the arcade games used hard drives and TMS processors, although they were based on the MIPS R4600 CPU.[citation needed] Killer Instinct was the most advanced game of its time graphically, featuring pre-rendered movie backgrounds that were streamed off the hard drive and animated as the characters moved horizontally. Nintendo dropped "Ultra" from the name on May 1, 1996, just months before its Japanese debut, because the word "Ultra" was trademarked by another company, Konami, for its Ultra Games division. The console was finally released on June 23, 1996.[1] Rare, Ltd is a United Kingdom-based video game development company. ... Midway Games (NYSE: MWY) (formerly Midway Manufacturing) is an American video game publisher. ... For the FOX television series, see Killer Instinct (TV series) For the reference to the human behaviour, see Killer Instinct (human behaviour). ... Cruisn USA is racing game released in 1994 at the arcades developed by Midway Games and Nintendo. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN), better known in the electronics industry (and popularly) as TI, is an American company based in Dallas, Texas, USA, renowned for developing and commercializing semiconductor and computer technology. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... The Ultra Games logo. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Market share

The North American launch on September 29, 1996 ended with 500,000 N64 units sold in the first four months.[9] Benimaru Itoh, a developer for EarthBound 64 and friend of Shigeru Miyamoto, speculated in 1997 that the N64's lack of popularity in Japan was due to the lack of role-playing video games.[10] As of March 31, 2005, the N64 has sold 5.54 million units in Japan, 20.63 million in the Americas, and 6.75 million in other regions.[11] is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Mother 3 ) is a role-playing video game for the Game Boy Advance handheld game console, developed by HAL Laboratory and Brownie Brown, published by Nintendo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


Among fifth generation video game consoles, as of 2007, the PlayStation has shipped 102.49 million units worldwide, the most of its generation; production had continued until March 23, 2006.[12][13] The N64 came in a distant second with 32.9 million units sold,[2][3] and the Sega Saturn came in third with 17 million units sold.[14] In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... Game console redirects here. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ...


The system was frequently marketed as the world's first 64-bit gaming system. A few years prior Atari claimed to have made the first 64-bit game console with their Jaguar, though the Jaguar's technical abilities were often debated based upon varying definitions of what constitutes a 64-bit system and its limitations with regards to generating 3D graphics when compared to competitors such as the Sony Playstation and the Nintendo 64.


Hardware

The new controller included with Nintendo 64 consisted of 1 analog stick, 2 shoulder buttons, 1 digital cross pad, 6 face buttons, a 'start' button, and one digital trigger (Z). It beat the Sega Saturn's analog controller to market by approximately one month.[15] An analog stick from the Nintendo GameCube game controller An analog stick, sometimes called thumbstick, often mistakenly referred to as a joystick, is an input device for a controller (often a game controller) that is used for two-dimensional input. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ...


The official prefix for the Nintendo 64's model numbering scheme is "NUS-", a reference to the system's original name, Nintendo Ultra Sixty-Four.

Nintendo 64 chipset: CPU, RCP, and RDRAM.
Nintendo 64 chipset: CPU, RCP, and RDRAM.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (686x740, 58 KB) Nintendo 64 chipset: CPU, RCP, 2x RDRAM. Chips scanned by Swaaye I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (686x740, 58 KB) Nintendo 64 chipset: CPU, RCP, 2x RDRAM. Chips scanned by Swaaye I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License...

Central processing unit

The Nintendo 64's central processing unit (CPU) is a MIPS R4300i-based NEC VR4300.[16] The CPU was clocked at 93.75 MHz and connects to the rest of the system through a 32-bit data bus. VR43045 is a RISC 5-stage scalar in-order execution processor with an integrated floating point unit. It is a 64-bit processor, in that it has 64-bit registers, a 64-bit instruction set, and 64-bit internal data paths. However, the cost-reduced NEC VR4300 CPU utilized in the console only has 32-bit buses whereas more powerful MIPS CPUs are equipped with 64-bit buses.[16] (In this respect, the N64 CPU is similar to the 32-bit Motorola 68000 which is considered a 16-bit architecture, due to its bus limitation.) Many games took advantage of the chip's 32-bit processing mode as the greater data precision available with 64-bit data types is not typically required by 3D games. Also 64-bit data uses twice as much RAM, cache, and bandwidth, thereby reducing the overall system performance.[17] This was later taken advantage of by emulators such as the UltraHLE and Project64 that had to run on 32-bit PC systems. These emulators performed most calculations at 32-bit precision, and trapped the few OS subroutines that actually made use of 64-bit instructions.[17] CPU redirects here. ... A MIPS R4400 microprocessor made by Toshiba. ... For other uses, see NEC (disambiguation). ... 32-bit is a term applied to processors, and computer architectures which manipulate the address and data in 32-bit chunks. ... In computer architecture, a bus is a subsystem that transfers data or power between computer components inside a computer or between computers and typically is controlled by device driver software. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scalar processors represent the simplest class of computer processors. ... In computer engineering, out-of-order execution, OoOE, is a paradigm used in most high-performance microprocessors in order to make use of cycles that would otherwise be wasted by a certain type of costly delay. ... A floating point unit (FPU) is a part of a computer system specially designed to carry out operations on floating point numbers. ... In computing, a 64-bit component is one in which data are processed or stored in 64-bit units (words). ... In computer architecture, a processor register is a small amount of very fast computer memory used to speed the execution of computer programs by providing quick access to frequently used values—typically, these values are involved in multiple expression evaluations occurring within a small region on the program. ... An instruction set is [a list of] all the instructions, and all their variations, that a processor can execute. ... The Motorola 68000 is a 16/32-Bit [1] CISC microprocessor core designed and marketed by Freescale Semiconductor (formerly Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector). ... The precision of a value describes the number of digits that are used to express that value. ... This article is about emulators in computer science. ... UltraHLE is an emulator allowing games for the Nintendo 64 game console to be run on a computer. ... Project64 is a Nintendo 64 emulator for the Windows platform that was first released in 2001. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Exception handling. ...


The CPU has an internal 32 KiB L1 cache but no L2 cache. It was built by NEC on a 0.35 µm process and consists of 4.6 million transistors. The CPU is cooled passively by an aluminum heatspreader that makes contact with a steel heat sink above.[18] A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Diagram of a CPU memory cache A CPU cache is a cache used by the central processing unit of a computer to reduce the average time to access memory. ... Diagram of a CPU memory cache A CPU cache is a cache used by the central processing unit of a computer to reduce the average time to access memory. ... A micrometre (American spelling: micrometer, symbol µm) is an SI unit of length equal to one millionth of a metre, or about a tenth of the diameter of a droplet of mist or fog. ... NASAs Glenn Research Center cleanroom. ... Assorted discrete transistors A transistor is a semiconductor device, commonly used as an amplifier or an electrically controlled switch. ... Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the substance or device. ...


Memory

The final major component in the system is the memory, also known as RAM. The Nintendo 64 was the first console to implement a unified memory subsystem, instead of having separate banks of memory for CPU, audio, and video, for example. The memory itself consists of 4 MiB of RAMBUS RDRAM (expandable to 8 MiB with the Expansion Pak) with a 9-bit data bus at 500 MHz providing the system with 562.5 MB/s peak bandwidth. RAMBUS was quite new at the time and offered Nintendo a way to provide a large amount of bandwidth for a relatively low cost. The narrow bus makes board design easier and cheaper than the higher width data buses required for high bandwidth out of slower-clocked RAM types (such as VRAM or EDO DRAM). However RDRAM, at the time, came with a very high access latency, and this caused grief for the game developers because of limited hardware performance.[citation needed] RAM redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... Direct Rambus DRAM or DRDRAM (sometimes just called Rambus DRAM or RDRAM) is a type of synchronous dynamic RAM, designed by the Rambus Corporation. ... The 4MB Expansion Pak The Expansion Pak is a RAM add-on for the Nintendo 64 game console, released in 1998. ... Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of random access memory that stores each bit of data in a separate capacitor within an integrated circuit. ... Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) is a type of random access memory that stores each bit of data in a separate capacitor within an integrated circuit. ...


Video

The system provides both composite video and s-video through the MULTI-OUT connection on the back. The MULTI-OUT connector was also used on the earlier SNES and later GameCube systems, however the Nintendo 64 removed certain pin connections for providing RGB video, despite having the capability built-in. Composite video, also called CVBS (Composite Video Blanking and Sync), is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. ... S-Video (also known as Y/C) is a baseband analog video format offering a higher quality signal than composite video, but a lower quality than RGB and component video. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... The Nintendo GameCube ), often abbreviated as GCN, is Nintendos fourth home video game console and is part of the sixth generation era. ... REDIRECT RGB color model ...


Hardware color variations

A Nintendo 64 console and controller in Atomic Orange color.
A Nintendo 64 console and controller in Atomic Orange color.

The standard Nintendo 64 was dark gray, nearly black. A Jungle Green color was first available with the Donkey Kong 64 bundle. The Funtastic Series used brightly-colored, translucent plastic. There were six different Funtastic Series colors: Fire Orange, Grape Purple, Ice Blue, Jungle Green, Smoke Black, and Watermelon Red. Nintendo released a banana-like Nintendo 64 controller for the debut of Donkey Kong 64 in the United States. The Millennium 2000 controller, available exclusively as part of a Nintendo Power promotional contest, was a special silver controller in the United States. It is the only official Nintendo 64 controller to feature all black buttons. The first ever gold controller was released by a contest from the Nintendo Power magazine as part of a drawing. One was also released with shorter "arms" that for most made it hard to use. In late 1997 through 1998, a few gold Nintendo 64 controller packages were released worldwide; in the United Kingdom there was a limited edition GoldenEye 007 console pack which came with a standard grey console and a copy of Goldeneye. Also, a limited edition gold controller with standard grey console set was released in Australia and New Zealand in early 1998 without a game. This edition was endorsed by an advertising campaign which featured footage of N64 games including Top Gear Rally and ended with Australian swimmer Ian Thorpe wearing the gold controller as a medal around his neck. Nintendo released a gold controller for the debut of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time in Japan. Soon after, bundle packs of the game, controller and gold Nintendo 64 were released for the US and PAL markets. The Pokémon Edition Nintendo 64, with a Pokémon sticker on the left side, included the "Pokémon: I Choose You" video. The Pokémon Pikachu Nintendo 64 had a large, yellow Pikachu model on a blue Nintendo 64. It has a different footprint than the standard Nintendo 64 console, and the expansion port is covered. It also shipped with a unique blue Pokémon controller, and orange in Japan. The Limited Edition Star Wars bundle, which was available only during time of release of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and came bundled with Star Wars: Episode I Racer, is actually the exact same dark gray color as the regular Nintendo 64, and the "Limited Edition" on the box refers to the bundle itself, not the console.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 621 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 621 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture myself. ... Donkey Kong 64 is a 3D platformer video game developed by Rare for the Nintendo 64. ... For the film, see GoldenEye. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ...


Cartridges were usually gray in color, but sometimes occasionally in different colors as well. Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 3, Rally Challenge 2000, WWF No Mercy, WWF WrestleMania 2000, Rugrats in Paris, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six, Madden NFL 2002, Road Rash 64, Armorines: Project S.W.A.R.M. and Turok 2: Seeds of Evil had black cartridges; Rayman 2, Turok 2, Battletanx: Global Assault, and Army Men: Sarge's Heroes 2 had green ones (in North America only); Donkey Kong 64, Earthworm Jim 3D, and Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2 had yellow ones; Rocket: Robot on Wheels, Spider-Man (2000 video game), All Star Baseball 2001, and NFL Quarterback Club 2001 had red cartridges; Pokémon Stadium 2 had a gold-and-silver cartridge; The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Collector's Edition) and The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask had gold ones; and Tony Hawk's Pro Skater, Hydro Thunder, Bassmasters 2000, The World Is Not Enough, WCW Backstage Assault, and Madden NFL 2001 had blue ones.[citation needed] Tony Hawks Pro Skater 3, often called THPS3, is a video game in the Tony Hawks series. ... Rally Challenge 2000 is a racing game for the Nintendo 64, it was released in 2000. ... WWF No Mercy is a professional wrestling video game released in 2000 on the Nintendo 64 console and published by THQ. It is based on the World Wrestling Federations annual pay-per-view of the same name. ... WWF WrestleMania 2000 is a professional wrestling video game released in 1999 on the Nintendo 64 (N64) console. ... This article is about the first game in the Rainbow Six computer and video game series. ... Screenshot Madden NFL 2001 (Nintendo 64) Madden NFL is an American football video game developed by Electronic Arts Tiburon (EA) for EA Sports. ... Screenshot of Road Rash for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis For the common abrasion injury caused by high-speed contact with rough pavement, see road rash. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rayman_2:_Revolution. ... Turok 2: Seeds of Evil is a first-person shooter video game for Windows 9x, the Nintendo 64, and the Game Boy Color. ... Donkey Kong 64 is a 3D platformer video game developed by Rare for the Nintendo 64. ... Earthworm Jim 3D is to date the last console game in the Earthworm Jim series. ... Tony Hawks Pro Skater 2, often called THPS2, is the second game in the Tony Hawks series. ... Spider-Man is an action game based upon the Marvel Comics character, Spider-Man, mostly upon his incarnation on the 1994 animated series. ... NFL Quarterback Club 2001 is an american football game for the Nintendo 64, it was released in 2001. ... Pokémon Stadium 2 (Pokémon Stadium GS in Japan) is a video game for the Nintendo 64. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ... Tony Hawks Pro Skater (THPS), released as Tony Hawks Skateboarding in Europe, is a skateboarding video game, and the first in the Tony Hawks series. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The World Is Not Enough is a first-person shooter video game based on the James Bond film of the same name. ... WCW Backstage Assault is a video game by Electronic Arts. ... Screenshot of Madden NFL 2001 (Nintendo 64) Screenshot of John Madden Football 93 (Sega Genesis) Madden NFL is an American football video game developed by Electronic Arts Tiburon (EA) for EA Sports. ...


Accessories

Main article: Nintendo 64 accessories

Programming difficulties

The Nintendo 64 had weaknesses that were caused by a combination of oversight on the part of the hardware designers, limitations on 3D technology of the time, and manufacturing capabilities. One major flaw was the limited texture cache of 4 KB. This made it extremely difficult to load anything but small textures into the rendering engine, especially textures with high color depth, and was the primary cause of blurry graphics. The small texture limitation caused blurring because developers would stretch these small textures to cover a surface and then the console's bilinear filtering would blur them even more. To make matters worse, because of how the renderer was designed, if mipmapping was used, the texture cache was effectively halved to 2 KB. To put this in perspective, this cache could be quickly filled with even small textures (a 64×64 16-color texture is 2 KB and a 128×64 4 bpp texture is 4 KB). Modern video cards and consoles (2006) frequently deal with 1024 x 1024 8 bpp and larger textures, and have a more flexible texture cache (not always larger). Towards the end of Nintendo 64's lifetime, creative developers managed to use tricks, such as multi-layered texturing and heavily-clamped small texture pieces, to simulate larger textures. Conker's Bad Fur Day is possibly the best example of this ingenuity. Games would often also use plain colored Gouraud shading instead of texturing on certain surfaces, especially in games with themes not targeting realism (e.g., Super Mario 64).[citation needed] For other uses, see cache (disambiguation). ... A kilobyte (derived from the SI prefix kilo-, meaning 1,000) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to either 1,000 bytes or 1,024 bytes (210), depending on context. ... Color depth is a computer graphics term describing the number of bits used to represent the color of a single pixel in a bitmapped image or video frame buffer. ... A zoomed small portion of a bitmap of a cat, using nearest neighbor filtering (left) and bicubic filtering (right). ... In 3D computer graphics texture mapping, MIP maps (also mipmaps) are pre-calculated, optimized collections of bitmap images that accompany a main texture, intended to increase rendering speed and reduce artifacts. ... Conkers Bad Fur Day is a Nintendo 64 video game developed and published by Rare, and distributed by Nintendo. ... Gouraud shaded sphere - note the inaccuracies towards the edges of the polygons. ... For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ...


There were other challenges for developers to work around. Z-buffering significantly crippled the RDP's fillrate. Thus, for maximum performance, managing the z-depth of objects, so objects would appear in the right order and not on top of each other, was put on the programmer instead of the hardware. Most Nintendo 64 games were actually fill-rate limited, not geometry limited, which is ironic considering the great concern for Nintendo 64's low ~100,000 polygon per second rating during its time. In fact, World Driver Championship was one of the most polygon-intense Nintendo 64 games and frequently would push past Sony PlayStation's typical in-game polygon counts. This game also used custom microcode to improve the RSP's capabilities.[citation needed] Z-buffering is a term in computer graphics which refers to management of image depth coordinates in 3-d graphics, mainly used in hardware, more seldom in software. ... World Driver Championship is a automobile racing video game. ...


The unified memory subsystem of Nintendo 64 was another critical weakness for the machine. The RDRAM had very high access latency and this mostly canceled out its high bandwidth advantage. A high latency memory subsystem creates delays in how fast the processors can get the data they need, and how fast they can alter this data. Game developers also said that the Nintendo 64's memory controller setup was fairly poor, and this magnified the situation somewhat. The R4300 CPU was the worst off component because it had to go through the RCP to access main memory, and could not use DMA (the RCP could) to do so, so its RAM access performance was quite poor. There was no memory prefetch or read under write functionality either.[citation needed] Direct Rambus DRAM or DRDRAM (sometimes just called Rambus DRAM or RDRAM) is a type of synchronous dynamic RAM, designed by the Rambus Corporation. ... Direct memory access (DMA) is a feature of modern computers that allows certain hardware subsystems within the computer to access system memory for reading and/or writing independently of the central processing unit. ... In Computer architecture, instruction prefetch is a common technique used in modern microprocessors to speed up the execution of a program by reducing wait states. ...

Star Wars: Battle for Naboo's draw distance.
Star Wars: Battle for Naboo's draw distance.

One of the best examples of the benefits of custom microcode on the Nintendo 64 was Factor 5's N64 port of the Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine PC game. The Factor 5 team wanted the game to run in high resolution mode (640×480) because of the crispness it added to the visuals. The machine was taxed to the limit running at 640×480 so they absolutely needed the best hardware performance possible. Firstly, the Z-buffer could not be used because it alone consumed a huge amount of the console's texture fillrate. To work around the 4 KB texture cache the programmers came up with custom texture formats and tools to help the artists make the best possible textures. The tool would analyze each texture and try to choose the best texture format to work with the machine and look as good as possible. They took advantage of the cartridge as a texture streaming source to squeeze as much detail as possible into each environment, and work around RAM limitations. They wrote microcode for real-time lighting, because the SGI code was poor for this task, and they wanted to have even more lighting than the PC version had used. Factor 5's microcode allowed almost unlimited real-time lighting, and significantly boosted the polygon count. In the end, the game was more feature-filled than the PC version, and unsurprisingly, was one of the most advanced games for Nintendo 64.[19] Image File history File links Naboo1. ... Image File history File links Naboo1. ... Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine is a video game for the Nintendo 64, Microsoft Windows, and Game Boy Color based on the character and film series Indiana Jones. ... Streaming may mean: Streaming media, multimedia data transferred in a stream of packets that are interpreted and rendered, in real time, by a software application as the packets arrive. ...


Factor 5 also showed ingenuity with their Star Wars games such as Star Wars: Rogue Squadron and Star Wars: Battle for Naboo, where their team again used custom microcode. In Star Wars: Rogue Squadron the team tweaked the microcode for a landscape engine to create the alien worlds. For Star Wars: Battle for Naboo they took what they learned from Rogue Squadron and pushed the machine even farther to make the game run at 640×480, also implementing enhancements for both particles and the landscape engine. Battle for Naboo enjoyed an impressive draw distance and large amounts of snow and rain, even with the high resolution.[20] This article is about the series. ...


Cartridges

Nintendo 64 games were ROM cartridge based. Cartridge size varied from 4 MiB (32 Mbit) (i.e., Automobili Lamborghini and Dr. Mario 64) to 64 MiB (512 Mbit) for Resident Evil 2 and Conker's Bad Fur Day. Some of the cartridges included internal EEPROM or battery-backed-up RAM for saved game storage. Otherwise game saves were put onto a separate memory card, marketed by Nintendo as a Controller Pak. IBM PCjr; two ROM cartridge slots are below the floppy drives. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... For the motor company, see Lamborghini. ... Dr. Mario is a puzzle game based on the original Dr. Mario. ... Resident Evil 2, known in Japan as Biohazard 2 ), is a survival horror game by Capcom originally released for the PlayStation in 1998. ... Conkers Bad Fur Day is a Nintendo 64 video game developed and published by Rare, and distributed by Nintendo. ... EEPROM (also written E2PROM and pronounced e-e-prom or simply e-squared), which stands for Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory, is a type of non-volatile memory used in computers and other electronic devices to store small amounts of data that must be saved when power is removed... Standard Controller Pak, rear view. ...


The selection of the cartridge for the Nintendo 64 was a key factor in Nintendo's being unable to retain its dominant position in the gaming market. Most of the cartridge's advantages did not manifest themselves prominently and they were ending up nullified by the cartridge's shortcomings, which turned off customers and developers alike. Especially for the latter, it was costly and difficult to develop for ROM cartridges, as their limited storage capacity constrained the game's content.[citation needed]


Most third-party developers switched to the PlayStation (such as Square and Enix, whose Final Fantasy VII and Dragon Quest VII were initially pre-planned for the N64), while some who remained released fewer games to the Nintendo 64 (Capcom, with only 3 games; Konami, with 13 N64 games and over 50 to the PlayStation), and new game releases were few and far between while new games were coming out rapidly for the PlayStation. Most of the N64's biggest successes were developed by Nintendo itself or by second-parties of Nintendo, such as Rareware.[citation needed] Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... The Enix Corporation ) was a company that produced Japanese video games and manga. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... Dragon Quest VII: Eden no Senshi-tachi (Japanese: エデンの戦士たち, lit. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ...


Despite the controversies, the N64 still managed to support popular games such as GoldenEye 007 and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, giving it a long life run. Much of this success was credited to Nintendo's strong first-party franchises, such as Mario and Zelda, which had strong name brand appeal yet appeared exclusively on Nintendo platforms. The N64 also secured its share of the mature audience thanks to GoldenEye 007, Nightmare Creatures, Perfect Dark, Doom 64, Resident Evil 2, Shadow Man, Conker's Bad Fur Day, Duke Nukem 64, Duke Nukem: Zero Hour, Mortal Kombat 4, and Quake II.[citation needed] For the film, see GoldenEye. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ... This is a list of video game franchises organised alphabetically by name. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... A Legend of Zelda series logo The Legend of Zelda series (often shortened to Zelda, TLoZ, or LoZ), by Nintendo, is a series of video games created by celebrated game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. ... For the film, see GoldenEye. ... Nightmare Creatures is a 3D action/adventure video game released for the Sony PlayStation and PC in 1997, and Nintendo 64 in 1998. ... This article is about the video game. ... Doom 64 is a video game for the Nintendo 64 released by Midway Games in 1997. ... Resident Evil 2, known in Japan as Biohazard 2 ), is a survival horror game by Capcom originally released for the PlayStation in 1998. ... Shadow Man is a video game developed by Acclaim Studios Teesside and published by Acclaim Entertainment. ... Conkers Bad Fur Day is a Nintendo 64 video game developed and published by Rare, and distributed by Nintendo. ... Duke Nukem 64 is a Nintendo 64 port of the first-person shooter PC (MS-DOS) video game Duke Nukem 3D. There are many changes from the PC version. ... Mortal Kombat 4 (1997) was the last game in the Mortal Kombat series to have an arcade version. ... -1...


In 2001, the Nintendo 64 was replaced by the disc-based Nintendo GameCube. The Nintendo GameCube ), often abbreviated as GCN, is Nintendos fourth home video game console and is part of the sixth generation era. ...


Nintendo cited several advantages for making the N64 cartridge-based.[21] For example, ROM cartridges have very fast load times in comparison to disc-based games, as contemporary CD-ROM drives rarely had speeds above 4x. This can be observed from the loading screens that appear in many Sony PlayStation games but are typically non-existent in N64 versions. ROM carts were so much faster than the 2x CD-ROM drives in other consoles that developers could stream data in real-time off them. This was done in Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine, for example, to make the most of the limited RAM in the N64.[19] Also, ROM cartridges are difficult and expensive to duplicate, thus resisting piracy, albeit at the expense of lowered profit margin for Nintendo. While unauthorized interface devices for the PC were later developed, these devices are rare when compared to a regular CD drive and popular mod chips as used on the PlayStation. Compared to the N64, piracy was rampant on the PlayStation. The cartridges are also far more durable than compact discs, the latter which must be carefully used and stored in protective cases. This makes the cartridges better suited for young children who do not know how to take care of CD-ROMs. It also prevents accidental scratches and subsequent read errors.[21] It is possible to add specialized I/O hardware and support chips (such as co-processors) to ROM cartridges, as was done on some SNES games (notably Star Fox, using the Super FX chip).[21] Nintendo Company Ltd. ... IBM PCjr; two ROM cartridge slots are below the floppy drives. ... CD redirects here. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine is a video game for the Nintendo 64, Microsoft Windows, and Game Boy Color based on the character and film series Indiana Jones. ... Look up RAM, Ram, ram in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The copyright infringement of software (also known as software piracy) refers to several practices when done without the permission of the copyright holder: Creating a copy and/or selling it. ... Profit margin, Net Margin or Net Profit Ratio all refer to a measure of profitability. ... A modchip is a device used to play import games and/or circumvent the digital rights management of many popular game consoles, including the Xbox and PlayStation. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Star Fox ) (also known as Star Wing in Europe due to trademark issues) is the first game in the Star Fox series of video games. ... Super FX-rendered 3D polygon graphics in the SNES game Star Fox The Super FX is probably the most widely recognized coprocessor chip used in select Super Nintendo (SNES) video game cartridges. ...


ROM cartridges also have disadvantages associated with them. While game cartridges are more resistant than CDs to physical damage, they are sometimes less resistant to long-term environmental damage, particularly oxidation or wear of their electrical contacts causing a blank or frozen screen, or static electricity. Console cartridges are usually larger and heavier than optical discs and hence take up more room to store. They also have a more complex manufacturing processes, which meant that games were usually more expensive than their optical counterparts. The cartridges held a maximum of 64 MB of data, whereas CDs held over 650 MB. As fifth generation games became more complex in content, sound, and graphics, it pushed cartridges to the limits of their storage capacity. Games ported from other media had to use data compression or reduced content in order to be released on the N64. Extremely large games could be made to span across multiple discs on CD-based systems, while cartridge games had to be contained within one unit since using an additional cartridge was prohibitively expensive (and was never tried). Because of a cartridge's space limitations, full motion video was not usually feasible for use in cut-scenes. The cut-scenes of some other games used graphics generated by the CPU in real-time.[22] In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ...


Graphics

Screenshot of Super Mario 64, showing limited texture detail and Gouraud shading (Mario himself). The trees are two dimensional and always facing the camera. (Known as a billboard)
Screenshot of Super Mario 64, showing limited texture detail and Gouraud shading (Mario himself). The trees are two dimensional and always facing the camera. (Known as a billboard)

Graphically, results of the Nintendo cartridge system were mixed. The N64's graphics chip was capable of trilinear filtering, which allowed textures to look very smooth compared to the Sega Saturn and the PlayStation; neither could provide better than nearest neighbor interpolation, resulting in textures that were highly pixelated compared to the N64.[citation needed] screenshot N64 Super_Mario_64 Start, made by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... screenshot N64 Super_Mario_64 Start, made by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... Spherical texture mapping Texture mapping is a method, pioneered by Edwin Catmull, of adding detail, surface texture, or colour to a computer-generated graphic or 3D model. ... Gouraud shaded sphere - note the inaccuracies towards the edges of the polygons. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard (advertising), a large outdoor sign usually used for advertising Billboard (magazine), a magazine devoted to the music industry The Billboard charts, inspired by the magazine The Billboard Music Award, sponsored by the magazine Billboard antenna, an array of parallel antennas with flat reflectors A method... Trilinear filtering is an extension of the bilinear texture filtering method, which also performs linear interpolation between mipmaps. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... An example of pixelation. ...


However, the smaller storage size of ROM cartridges limited the number of available textures, resulting in games which had blurry graphics because of the liberal use of stretched, low-resolution textures, which was compounded by the N64's 4096-byte limit on a single texture. Some games, such as Super Mario 64, use a large amount of Gouraud shading or very simple textures to produce a cartoon-like look. This fit the themes of many games, and allowed this style of imagery a sharp look. Gouraud shaded sphere - note the inaccuracies towards the edges of the polygons. ...



Later cartridges, such as Resident Evil 2, featured more ROM space, which demonstrated that N64 was capable of detailed in-game graphics when the media permitted, though this came at an expense.[citation needed] Resident Evil 2, known in Japan as Biohazard 2 ), is a survival horror game by Capcom originally released for the PlayStation in 1998. ...


Production

This era's competing systems from Sony and Sega (the PlayStation and Saturn, respectively) used CD-ROM discs to store their games. These discs are much cheaper to manufacture and distribute, resulting in lower costs to third party game publishers. As a result, game developers who had traditionally supported Nintendo game consoles were now developing games for the competition because of the higher profit margins found on CD based platforms.[citation needed] Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... This article is about the video game company. ...


Cartridges took much longer to manufacture than CDs, with each production run (from order to delivery) taking 2 to 3 weeks (or more).[23] By contrast, extra copies of a CD based game could be ordered with a lead time of a few days. This meant that publishers of N64 titles had to attempt to predict demand for a game ahead of its release. They risked being left with a surplus of expensive cartridges for a failed game or a weeks-long shortage of product if they underestimated a game's popularity.[23]


The cost of producing an N64 cartridge was far higher than producing a CD: one gaming magazine at the time cited average costs of twenty-five dollars per cartridge, versus 10 cents per CD. Publishers had to pass these higher expenses to the consumer and as a result, N64 games tended to sell for higher prices than PlayStation games did. While most PlayStation games rarely exceeded $50, N64 titles could reach $79.99.[24] Sony's line of PlayStation Greatest Hits retailed for $19.99 each, while Nintendo's Player's Choice value line had an MSRP of $39.99. In the United Kingdom, prices around the time of introduction for N64 cartridges were £54.99, and PlayStation games at £44.99 for new titles.[citation needed]


Cartridge-copy counter-measures

Each Nintendo 64 cartridge contains a so-called lockout chip (similar in spirit to the 10NES) to prevent manufacturers from creating unauthorized copies of games, and to discourage production of unlicensed games. Unlike previous versions, the N64 lockout chip contains a seed value which is used to calculate a checksum of the game's boot code. To discourage playing of copied games by piggybacking a real cartridge, Nintendo produced five different versions of the chip. During the boot process the N64 would compute the checksum of the boot code and verify it with the lockout chip in the game cartridge, failing to boot if the check failed. Some games, such as Banjo Tooie, perform additional checks while running.[citation needed] Particularly sought after games such as Rush'n'Attack, Kirby's Adventure or Yie Ar Kung Fu had spring loaded blades at the end of articulated arms coupled with fingercuffs internal to the Nintendo 64 console. When a pirated cartridge was inserted the cuffs would lock around the pirate's knuckles and the blades would extend from the cartridge to carve a Nintendo Offence Number on the perpetrator's forearm. This number encoded the game copied, the method attempted, as well as the console serial number and purchase location. This means of copy prevention was discontinued after some children were found to be allergic to the inks injected subcutaneously during the branding procedure. The RAMBO-1, a version of Tengens Rabbit lockout chip 10NES was the authentication code for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) video game console. ... A checksum is a form of redundancy check, a simple way to protect the integrity of data by detecting errors in data that are sent through space (telecommunications) or time (storage). ... In computing, booting (booting up) is a bootstrapping process that starts operating systems when the user turns on a computer system. ... Banjo-Tooie is a platform and action-adventure hybrid video game developed by Rare and published by Nintendo in 2000 for the Nintendo 64 as a part of the Banjo-Kazooie series. ... Kirbys Adventure, known in Japan as Hoshi no Kirby: Yume no Izumi no Monogatari , lit. ... Yie-Ar Kung Fu is a game where some guy named Oolong fights martial arts masters. ...


Games

See also: List of Nintendo 64 games and Player's Choice

The Nintendo 64 game library included a number of critically acclaimed and widely sold games.[25] The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was critically acclaimed on release and has come top of many polls for best game ever. Super Mario 64 was the system's best selling title (selling over eleven million copies) and also received praise from critics. 1997's GoldenEye 007, was nominated by Marc Russo as one of the greatest games of all time, and, in his words, remains "to this day . . . the finest game I've ever played across any platform or genre."[26] Its release was exclusive to the Nintendo 64 system. This is a complete list of all 387 games for the Nintendo 64 video game system, organized alphabetically by their English titles or their alphabet conversions. ... The NTSC Players Choice release of the GameCube title Star Fox Adventures. ... The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time was a video game released in 1998, and the first Zelda game for the Nintendo 64. ... For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... For the film, see GoldenEye. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Nintendo 64 Roms: Games". Lycos. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  2. ^ a b c "A Brief History of Game Console Warfare: Nintendo 64". BusinessWeek. McGraw-Hill. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  3. ^ a b c "Annual Report 2006" (PDF) 14. Nintendo. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  4. ^ "All Time Top 20 Best Selling Games" (2003-05-21). Archived from the original on 2006-02-21. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  5. ^ "Tom Kalinske Interview". SEGA 16. Archived from the original on 2007-07-01. Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  6. ^ Greenstein, Jane (1996-09-13). "For developers, Nintendo 64 may be too costly.". HighBeam. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  7. ^ Liedholm, Marcus (1998-01-01). "The N64's Long Way to completion". Nintendo Land. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  8. ^ "Coverage of the Nintendo Ultra 64 Debut from Game Zero". Game Zero. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  9. ^ "Sega Dreamcast Sales Outstrip Expectations in N. America". Comline Computers (1999-10-06). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  10. ^ Takao Imamura, Shigeru Miyamoto (1997). Nintendo Power August, 1997 - Pak Watch E3 Report "The Game Masters". Nintendo, 104-105. 
  11. ^ "05 Nintendo Annual Report - Nintendo Co., Ltd." (PDF) 33–34. Nintendo. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  12. ^ "PlayStation Cumulative Production Shipments of Hardware". Sony Computer Entertainment Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-09-05.
  13. ^ Sinclair, Brendan (2006-03-24). "Sony stops making original PS". News at GameSpot. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  14. ^ Blake Snow (2007-05-04). "The 10 Worst-Selling Consoles of All Time". GamePro.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  15. ^ "The Sega Saturn 3D Control Pad". Axess.com. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  16. ^ a b "Main specifications of VR4300TM-series". NEC. Retrieved on 2006-05-20.
  17. ^ a b "N64, God of all systems". Google Groups (1997-07-26). Retrieved on 2006-05-20.
  18. ^ "Inside Nintendo". Inside Nintendo. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  19. ^ a b "Bringing Indy to N64 (Infernal Machine)". IGN (2000-11-09). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  20. ^ "Interview: Battling the N64 (Naboo)". IGN64 (2000-11-10). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  21. ^ a b c (1994) Nintendo Power August, 1994 - Pak Watch (in English). Nintendo, 108. 
  22. ^ The Snes Cd-Rom
  23. ^ a b Bacani, Cesar and Mutsuko, Murakami (1997-04-18). "Nintendo's new 64-bit platform sets off a scramble for market share". Asiaweek. Archived from the original on 2005-12-26. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  24. ^ "Biggest Blunders" (May 2005). GamePro: 45. 
  25. ^ "IGN N64: Editors' Choice Games". IGN. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  26. ^ "The Greatest Games of All Time - The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time". GameSpot (2003-06-20). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... July 26 is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Asiaweek, the English edition, was a news magazine focusing on Asia, published weekly by Asiaweek Limited, a subsidiary of Time Inc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Nintendo 64
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Image File history File links Portal. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Packaging for the Color TV game (6) Nintendos Color TV Game Series debuted in 1977 with the Color TV Game 6. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... The NES 2 alongside its similarly redesigned dog bone game controller The NES 2 is a compact redesign of the original Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) video game console from Nintendo. ... The AV Famicom The AV Family Computer was a redesign of the original Family Computer video game console released by Nintendo in Japan in the early 1990s. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Super Game Boy Box art. ... The BS-X logo. ... Nintendos Virtual Boy ) (also known as the VR-32 during development) was the first portable game console capable of displaying true 3D graphics. ... The Nintendo 64DD (DD being short for Disk Drive) is an expansion system for the Nintendo 64. ... This article is about the home console. ... The Nintendo GameCube ), often abbreviated as GCN, is Nintendos fourth home video game console and is part of the sixth generation era. ... WaveBird controller The WaveBird Wireless Controller is an RF-based wireless controller manufactured by Nintendo for the GameCube video game console. ... The Panasonic Q multimedia console was a Nintendo GameCube with the ability to play DVDs, audio CDs, MP3 and CDs as well as several other features. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... (New Wide Screen), 1982 The Game & Watch (G&W) series were handheld electronic games made by Nintendo and created by its game designer Gunpei Yokoi from 1980 to 1991. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Game Boy ) line is a line of battery-powered handheld game consoles sold by Nintendo. ... The Game Boy ) line is a line of battery-powered handheld game consoles sold by Nintendo. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The Game Boy Advance SP ), released in February 2003, is an upgraded version of Nintendos Game Boy Advance. ... Game Boy Micro , trademarked Game Boy micro) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. ... The Nintendo DS (sometimes abbreviated NDS or more commonly DS) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. ... NDSL redirects here. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Nintendo Vs. ... The Play Choice 10 was a stand-up arcade video game hardware unit, for which the unit owner could purchase up to ten arcade games. ... The Nintendo Super System is an arcade system, which was used to preview Super Nintendo games in the U.S.. It was basically a Super Nintendo set up to use a menu which allowed the player to play the games for a certain amount of time depending on how many... The Triforce is an arcade system board developed jointly by Nintendo, Namco, and Sega, with the first games appearing in 2002. ... For other uses of R.O.B., see Rob. ... The Japanese Nintendo Power Glove, manufactured by PAX The Power Glove (1989) is a controller accessory for the Nintendo Entertainment System designed by the team of Grant Goddard and Sam Davis for Abrams/Gentile Entertainment, made by Mattel in the United States and PAX in Japan. ... The Power Pad (known in Japan as Family Trainer, and in Europe and briefly in the United States as Family Fun Fitness) is a floor mat game controller released in the United States for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... DK Bongos DK Bongos are drum-like controllers for the Nintendo GameCube game series Donkey Konga, Donkey Konga 2, Donkey Konga 3, and Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat. ... The U-Force is an accessory for the Nintendo Entertainment System made by Brøderbund. ... Nintendo optical discs refer to the optical disc format used to distribute video games released by Nintendo. ... This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ... Philips Videopac G7000 shown playing Pickaxe Pete The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, and also by many other names, was a video game console released in 1978. ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... The Telstar is a video game console produced by Coleco which first went on sale in 1976. ... Packaging for the Color TV game (6) Nintendos Color TV Game Series debuted in 1977 with the Color TV Game 6. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... The Fairchild Channel F is the worlds second cartridge-based video game console, after the Magnavox Odyssey. ... The RCA Studio II is a videogame console made by RCA that debuted in 1977. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... The VC 4000 is an early 8-bit cartridge-based game console released in Germany in 1978 by Interton. ... Magnavox Odyssey² video game console The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, in the United States as the Magnavox Odyssey² and the Philips Odyssey², and also by many other names, is a video game console released in 1978. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... Emerson Arcadia 2001, intended as a portable game console, the Arcadia 2001 was released by Emerson Radio Corp in mid-1982. ... The Atari 5200 SuperSystem, or simply Atari 5200, is a video game console that was introduced in 1982 by Atari as a replacement for the famous Atari 2600. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Vectrex is an 8-bit video game console developed by General Consumer Electric (GCE) and later bought by Milton Bradley Company. ... The SG-1000 ), which stands for Sega Game 1000, is a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Sega Master System is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega and was first released in 1986. ... The Atari 7800 is a video game console released by Atari in June 1986 (a test market release occurred two years earlier). ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... CD-i or Compact Disc Interactive is the name of an interactive multimedia CD player developed and marketed by Royal Philips Electronics N.V. CD-i also refers to the multimedia Compact Disc standard utilized by the CD-i console, also known as Green Book, which was co-developed by... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... For other uses, see 3DO. Crash n Burn on the 3DO, the systems first bundled title. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... The PC-FX console The PC-FX was NECs 32-bit sequel to its PC Engine (US:TurboGrafx 16). ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark, and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube ), often abbreviated as GCN, is Nintendos fourth home video game console and is part of the sixth generation era. ... For the Xboxs successor, see Xbox 360. ... In the history of video games, the seventh generation, which is also the current generation, primarily focuses on the consoles released since 2004 by Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nintendo 64 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5193 words)
Nintendo 64 is perhaps best known for one of its launch titles, Super Mario 64, which is still considered to have set the standard for 3D platform games and is considered by many to be one of the greatest games ever published.
The Nintendo 64 had some glaring weaknesses that were caused by a combination of oversight on the part of the hardware designers, limitations on 3D technology of the time, and manufacturing capabilities.
This was the primary cause of Nintendo 64's blurry texturing, secondary to the blurring caused by the bilinear filtering and limited ROM storage.
Nintendo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8728 words)
Nintendo has the reputation of historically being both the oldest intact company in the video game console market and one of the most influential and well-known console manufacturers, as well as being the most dominant entity in the handheld console market.
Nintendo decided that to avoid facing the same problems, they would only allow games that received their "Seal of Quality" to be sold for the Famicom, using a chip called 10NES to "lockout" or prevent unlicensed games from working.
Nintendo of Australia, its Australian division, is based in Scoresby, Melbourne, Victoria, and Nintendo Europe, the European division, is based in Großostheim, Germany.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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