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Encyclopedia > Ninja Gaiden
Ninja Gaiden
Developer(s) Tecmo
Publisher(s) Tecmo
Designer(s) Sakurazaki
Release date(s) JPN December 9, 1988
NA March, 1989
EUR August 15, 1991
Genre(s) Platformer / Beat 'em up
Mode(s) Single player
Platform(s) NES, MS-DOS, PC Engine, SNES, Xbox, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Mobile phones
Media Cartridge
Input Control pad

Ninja Gaiden (忍者龍剣伝 Ninja Ryūkenden, lit. Legend of the Ninja Dragon Sword in Japanese, also known as Shadow Warriors in Europe) is a platform game for the NES developed by Tecmo. Originally released in Japan towards the end of 1988, it was the first in a popular trilogy of Ninja Gaiden (忍者外伝) titles for the NES featuring the adventures of Ryu Hayabusa. The game is renowned for its innovative use of cinematic cutscenes, as well as for its high level of difficulty.[1] The game's success spawned two sequels and several ports to other video game systems. Image File history File links NG_NES.PNG‎ Ninja Gaiden for the NES. This image is cover art for a computer or video game, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the games publisher or developer. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates computer or video games. ... Tecmo, Ltd. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tecmo, Ltd. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms. ... An Iggy Pop album where his band first becomes known as the Trolls,Iggy Pop,Whitey Kirst,Pete Marshall,Alex Kirst,LloydMoosemanRoberts ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... NES redirects here. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES (pronounced either as a word or acronym), is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft. ... PlayStation 3 ) is Sony Computer Entertainments seventh-generation video game console, third in the PlayStation series. ... The Xbox 360 is the successor to Microsofts Xbox video game console, developed in cooperation with IBM, ATI, Samsung and SiS. Information on the console first came through viral marketing campaigns and it was officially unveiled on MTV on May 12, 2005, with detailed launch and game information divulged... In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... A game controller is an input device used to control a video game. ... Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft. ... Ninja Gaiden is a video game released for the Xbox featuring the Dragon Ninja, Ryu Hayabusa. ... Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms. ... NES redirects here. ... Tecmo, Ltd. ... Notable events of 1988 in computer and video games. ... Ryu Hayabusa is a fictional video game character who stars in the Ninja Gaiden series of video games, as well appearing in the Dead or Alive fighting game series, all developed by Team Ninja, a part of publisher Tecmo. ...

Contents

Story

Ryu Hayabusa of the Dragon Ninja Clan finds a letter from his father, Ken Hayabusa, explaining that he was leaving for a duel with some unknown warrior. The letter claimed that, should he not return, Ryu was to take the Dragon Sword, a mystical weapon and family heirloom said to have grown from the fang of a dragon, to America, where he should seek out a man named Walter Smith. The reason for this is not given, but Ryu honors his father's last request, vowing to take his revenge on the man who must have killed him. Soon after his arrival in America, Ryu is ambushed by a mysterious gang of thugs, who pursue him into a bar, occupied only by an axe wielding giant of a man known as the Barbarian, a member of the mysterious Malice Four. Ryu manages to defeat the powerful, but slow, lumbering warrior without too much difficulty, his speed and skill proving vastly superior. Not long, perhaps mere moments after, Ryu is approached from behind by a woman in black, who he quickly dismisses, an act he pays for, as the woman promptly shoots him.


Ryu wakes up some time later in some sort of cell, realizing it must have been a tranquilizer gun that was used against him. Strangely enough, the same woman opens the cell, and urges him to leave. She is evasive of Ryu's questions, insisting that he get out as soon as possible. Before he does, she gives him something, a small dark statue of some hideous creature that Ryu knows nothing about. Confused, he does so, wanting nothing so much as to continue his mission.


Wherever he has been taken, it is obviously someplace very remote, as he is forced to navigate some semi-crumbled ruins in view of the mountains, where he is again ambushed by his mysterious assailants. The attack ends when he comes to an altar room, where a tall masked man wielding a blade on a chain faces him in battle. His name is Bomberhead. He, too, is of the Malice Four. And he, like the Barbarian, falls to the Dragon Blade.


Some time later, Ryu finally locates Walter Smith in a cabin by the oceanside. After telling the slightly paranoid old man his identity, and assuring him that he is not, in fact, there to kill him, Smith tells him that Ryu's father had made it his goal to protect two statues that he and Walter, an archeologist, had discovered during an excavation of some old ruins. Namely, the Demon Statues of Light and Shadow. Ryu then remembers his encounter with the woman, and much to Walter's surprise, reveals his possession of the Shadow Statue. Ryu's father was trying to protect the Statue of Light during his mysterious battle, but fell to his enemy's sword, and lost the statue to him. During the conversation, a masked figure suddenly breaks into the cabin, snatches the Shadow Statue, and leaves almost as quickly as he came. Alarmed for reasons not yet explained, Smith orders Ryu to retrieve the statue.


Ryu chases the man across the beach, and even up into the mountains, where an armed ambush is waiting for him. This attempt fails, and Ryu manages to corner the man in a cave. The man, a ninja named Basaquer, is also of the Malice Four, and fights Ryu to his inevitable bitter end. Retriving the statue, Ryu makes the long way back to Smith's cabin, only to find out, to his shock, that Smith has been mortally wounded. Dying, Walter begs Ryu to protect both statues before he passes away. A moment later, Ryu turns to find three suited men, two of them armed and aiming at him, who take him into custody.


Ryu is taken to a dark room, and when the lights come on, he is introduced to Foster, the director of the CIA. Foster explains that the woman who shot him was one of their agents, and that they have been monitoring the activity of someone named Guardia De Meiux, better known as The Jaquio, for some time. Foster claims that Jaquio wishes to gain both statues for the purpose of unleashing a demon said to have once been defeated by a previous wielder of the Dragon Blade, who had sealed its spirit and power inside the Demon Statues. He then gives Ryu a choice; a suicide mission in Brazil to infiltrate The Jaquio's temple fortress and eliminate him, or, it is implied, die right then and there at his agents' hands.


This is, of course, no choice at all.


Ryu agrees to the mission, knowing that the alternative would be letting the Jaquio destroy the world as we know it. Ryu parachutes into a jungle in Brazil, and makes his way up the mountains to the temple, sneaking in through some old mining tunnels, and working his way up through the inner sanctum of Jaquio's lair. Upon coming face to face with the man, after killings his pets and guardians, the monstrous Kelberos', he discovers that The Jaquio has kidnapped the woman under Foster's command, a minion holding her at knifepoint, and offers Ryu his second lose/lose choice of the day. Let the girl die, or hand the statue over to him. Ryu gives up the statue, but the Jaquio doesn't hold up his end of the bargain, setting off a trap door that drops Ryu into the dungeons below.


Ryu manages to escape, fighting his way up the mountainside, and back into the temple, where he meets the leader of the Malice Four, Jaquio's strongest warrior: Bloody Malth. He goads Ryu into battle with the revelation that he was the man who fought and defeated Ken Hayabusa. After being fatally wounded, Malth reveals that Ryu's father is still alive, but assures Ryu that the Dragon Ninja would be dead before he meets him.


Going further into the compound, Ryu eventually finds his father. However, he has been brainwashed and has become a servant of the Jaquio by the name of the Masked Devil. Ryu has no choice but to fight his father. Ryu breaks Jaquio's hold over the elder Hayabusa by destroying a magical orb mounted in Jaquio's throne room, but their reunion is short lived as Jaquio fires a mystical bolt at Ryu. Ken throws himself in front of the blast, taking it in Ryu's place, and is mortally wounded. Enraged, Ryu throws himself into battle with Jaquio, and kills the scorceror before returning to his father's side. It seems that Ken is dying, and that Ryu will lose him once again. He, along with the girl, urges Ryu to retrieve the statues, as Jaquio has already completed his preparations, and the Demon will be unleashed upon the arrival of the Black Moon.


Before Ryu can do this, there is a sudden eclipse of the moon... and the Demon, a god of pure destruction, is unleashed. Ryu, his bloodline being that of the man who first sealed the Demon, and charged with insuring that this never happen, fights and destroys the Demon with the power of the Dragon Sword.


Ken, now, is at the end of his rope, and, with his dying breath, tells Ryu to escape with the girl. The two of them manage to make it out in time to watch it collapse into rubble from a nearby mountainside. As they stand in silence, overlooking the ruins that mark the graves of Ken Hayabusa, the Jaquio and the Demon, the girl receives a call from Foster, who congratulates her for a job well done. He orders her to retrieve the Demon Statues for him, and, now that the Dragon Ninja is no longer needed, kill Ryu. She hesitates, and Ryu takes the commuincator from her, telling Foster that he demands two rewards for his service. The first, he has already received. The second, he says before casting the radio off the mountain, is Foster himself, when they meet again.


The girl asks him what the reward he had already received was, and he says, simply, that it is her. He picks this moment to ask her her name, and she tells him it is Irene Lew. They embrace, and watch, silently, as the sun rises behind the temple ruins.


Ryu's Enemies

The Malice Four

Jaquio's lieutenants in Ninja Gaiden. Personally chosen by the Jaquio himself, these four villains will do anything and everything to stop Ryu Hayabusa from completing his mission. The Malice Four are as follows:

  • The Barbarian: Known as the Executioner of South America, and feared by the natives, the Barbarian uses the Amazon rainforests of Brazil as his hideout. Although his weapon, according to the instruction manual, claims to be a huge ax, it looks more like a scimitar instead. The easiest of the bosses. Ryu encounters him inside Jay's Bar.
  • Bomberhead: Second-in-command of the Malice Four. Originally from the Bronx, he was abandoned at a young age and quickly fell into a life of crime. Aside from being a member of the Malice Four, he also controls the streets of New York as the Lord of Evil. His main weapon is a sickle attached to a chain. Found lurking inside Amura's Altar.
  • Basaquer: A master of various Chinese martial arts. Was a member of a Chinese killers' organization called the "Five Ranges of Doom," but was thrown out because of his sadistic methods. However, instead of a liability, the Jaquio sees him as a perfect candidate for the Malice Four. Ryu corners him inside Yomi's Cave while in pursuit to recover the stolen Shadow Demon Statue.
  • Bloody Malth: The boss of the Malice Four, and the only person who bested Ryu's father, Ken Hayabusa, in combat. He is the cursed man of Northern European legend, since he bears the "Iron Mask of Blood" and the "Shield of Death." When he was younger, he mastered Japanese martial arts and studied Eastern Philosophy. He is considered the second-hardest boss in Ninja Gaiden by some, but can be easily dispatched with certain tactics. Once Malth is defeated, he tells Ryu some shocking news before he dies: "Your father is alive." Malth awaits Ryu at the Place of Red Execution.

Jaquio and his Servants

  • Kelbeross - Once Jaquio's pet dog, Kelbeross was given up as a sacrifice to the evil spirits the Jaquio had pledged his life to. As a result, the soul of Kelbeross returns and takes the form of a pair of creatures, continuing to be a loyal servant, protecting Jaquio.
  • The Masked Devil - Ryu's father, under Jaquio's mind control. The Masked Devil was being controlled via a crystal on the wall of the throne room, which Ryu promptly shattered, freeing his father from the grip of the Jaquio.
  • Guardia de Mieux, a.k.a. The Jaquio - The self-proclaimed "evil demon king", he is the almighty evil, determined to take over the world by utilizing the power of a long-sealed God. He believes in the legends that surround the evil temple ruins deep in the Amazon. He has taken over the temple to build an empire of evil, and utilize its spiritual powers. However, there may be more to his plans than meets the eye...
  • The Demon (Jashin) - The ancient God of Destruction sealed away centuries ago by Shinobi, an ancestor of the Dragon Clan. Shinobi managed to seal it in two statues of Light and Shadow, before separating the statues so that the beast could never return. Jaquio, however, plans to free this monster, and gain tremendous power from the energy that will be released when it comes to life.

Reception

Upon its release, Ninja Gaiden was met with high sales, directly spawning the 1990 sequel, Ninja Gaiden II: The Dark Sword of Chaos. However, some critics have bemoaned Ninja Gaiden's gameplay as being too similar to another successful NES platformer, Castlevania.[2] In recent times, the game has been considered "groundbreaking" for its pioneering use of stylized cutscenes, as well as its high quality music and dark atmosphere.[3][4] Castlevania , lit. ...


The title's extreme difficulty is often a source of both praise and contempt. Of particular note was Ninja Gaiden's final set of levels, where a death forced the player several stages back to replay the hardest area in the game.[1][5]


Ninja Gaiden also received strong publicity in Nintendo Power during 1989. It was featured on the cover of the magazine's fifth issue[6] and was satirized in the following issue in a Howard and Nester comic strip.[7][8] Speaking to the game's difficulty, Ninja Gaiden also appeared in several issues that year in the magazine's Counselor's Corner and Classified Information help sections.[9] Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly American news and strategy magazine from Nintendo. ... Nester (in Pilotwings 64, Lark) was the long-time teenage mascot and comic strip star of Nintendo Power magazine, as well as a sometime video game character. ...


The title is still revered today was one of the most popular games for the Nintendo Entertainment System. In a 2006 Joystiq reader poll including over 12,000 votes, Ninja Gaiden ranked #10 in a vote on top games for the system.[10] In a followup feature to an Electronic Gaming Monthly article, "The 200 Greatest Videogames of Their Time", readers wrote in to discuss games they felt were ignored in the list; Ninja Gaiden placed 19th in the top 25 games discussed.[11] During the end of 2005, Nintendo Power ran a serial feature, the Top 200 Nintendo Games Ever, spanning games for all Nintendo systems where Ninja Gaiden was ranked #89.[12] Joystiq is a video gaming weblog founded in June 2004 that has since become one of the most successful sites within the Weblogs, Inc. ...


Origin and ports

Although the NES game, Ninja Gaiden, was the second title to bear the name, there were few similarities to the original arcade game. Ninja Gaiden in the arcade was a two-player co-op beat 'em up, reminiscent of other street fighting games such as Double Dragon and Renegade. The arcade game's controls were sloppy and slow by comparison. Besides the opening cinematic of a ninja duel and the similar opening urban stages, the NES and arcade games had different gameplay, graphics, and storylines.[13] Ninja Gaiden is a 1988s arcade game released by Tecmo. ... Doom popularised co-op on the PC. Cooperative gameplay (often abbreviated as co-op) primarily refers to a feature in video games that allows players to work together as teammates with the absence of player-controlled competitors. ... An Iggy Pop album where his band first becomes known as the Trolls,Iggy Pop,Whitey Kirst,Pete Marshall,Alex Kirst,LloydMoosemanRoberts ... Billy and Jimmy Lee, the protagonists of the Double Dragon series. ... Renegade is a video game released in American and European arcades in 1986 by Taito. ...


Many video games were released bearing the Ninja Gaiden name between 1989 and 1992, including games for the PC, Atari Lynx, Sega Master System, Sega Mega Drive, and Game Gear. However, the only version that was a direct port of the NES title was the 1992 Japan-only release for the PC Engine. It featured an alternate English translation and more colorful graphics, as well as various difficulty and gameplay tweaks from the original.[14] The Atari Lynx is Ataris only handheld game console, and the worlds first handheld portable gaming system with a color display. ... The Sega Master System (SMS for short) is an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world. ... The Sega Game Gear was Segas first portable gaming system. ... The PC Engine was a video game console released by NEC, a Japanese company, in 1987. ...


Along with the two other Ninja Gaiden games for the NES, this title appeared in the enhanced remake for the SNES, Ninja Gaiden Trilogy. Some reviewers appreciated the redrawn graphics and music in this version, but others found it an inadequate effort. Electronic Gaming Monthly reviewers compared it unfavorably to another updated NES remake, Mega Man: The Wily Wars, and called Trilogy "an exact port-over with no noticeable enhancements in graphics, sound and play control".[15] In the video game subculture, an enhanced remake (also called updated classics) is an updated version of a video or computer game that was originally developed for a less advanced system. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES (pronounced either as a word or acronym), is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... This is a compilation of the 3 Ninja Gaiden games on the NES with minor graphic and sound update and added a password system to the first game. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ...


The Trilogy version of the game also appeared as an unlockable bonus feature on the Xbox game that relaunched the series in 2004.[16] The same year, Tecmo also began releasing episodic chapters of Ninja Gaiden for mobile phones in low-priced installments for small groups of levels.[17] It is currently only available for purchase in Japan, although the official English Tecmo Games mobile website has begun advertising it for a future release along with a mobile version of Tecmo Bowl.[18] The complete game is planned for mobile release in four installments.[19] Ninja Gaiden is a video game released for the Xbox featuring the Dragon Ninja, Ryu Hayabusa. ... Episodic gaming refers to a distribution system of selling computer and video games in a sequence of episodes, akin to a serialized novel, where each episode is sold as a separate purchase and in the end together form a continuous story or experience. ... Tecmo Bowl, created in 1988 by Tecmo, Inc. ...


Other appearances

A novelization of this game under the Worlds of Power line of NES game adaptations was published in July 1990 by Scholastic Press. It was written by Peter Lerangis under the pseudonym "A.L. Singer", though the book is also often credited to "F.X. Nine", a pen name for the main Worlds of Power writer, Seth Godin. As with all of the Worlds of Power books, the amount of violence present in the video game was severely toned down for the novel, due to concerns of appropriateness for the young target audience. Similarly, it did not strictly adhere to the storyline of the game, changing the ending so that Ryu's father survived at the conclusion. The book's cover, which was a replication of the North American box art, was infamous for the kunai held in Ryu's front hand being airbrushed out, leaving him prodding an empty fist.[20] The Worlds of Power books were a series of novelizations of video games for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ...


A soundtrack CD, Ninja Ryukenden: Tecmo GSM-1, was released by Pony Canyon in February 1989.[21] It features an arranged medley of various music from the game, as well as slightly enhanced versions of the original game's tracks. The CD also included music from the original arcade version of Ninja Gaiden. Pony Canyon is a large Japanese company, established on October 1st 1966, which publishes music, DVD and VHS videos, movies and video games. ...


English Trivia

  • Some players might find it difficult to make sense of the names "Kelbeross" and "Basaquer", due to the English used. The correct names, if used, would've been Berserker and Kerberos, but since Berserker (バーサーカー, bāsākā) is pronounced "Bah-sah-kah" in Japanese and Kerberos (ケルベロス, keruberosu) - Greek for Cerberus - is spelled "Ke-ru-be-ro-su", Engrish spellings were used and are more familiarized with American players.

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In Norse mythology, Berserkers (or Berserks) were warriors who fought naked, in an uncontrollable rage or trance of fury, the berserkergang. ... Kerberos can refer to different things: Kerberos (mythology), the hound of Hades. ... Cerberus - Watercolour by William Blake In Greek mythology, Cerberus or Kerberos (Greek Κέρβερος, Kerberos, demon of the pit), was the hound of Hades—a monstrous three-headed dog (sometimes said to have 50 or 100 heads) with a snake for a tail and serpentine mane. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Parish, Jeremy (May 9, 2004). Ninja Gaiden NES Review. 1up.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  2. ^ Kohler, Chris (January 30, 2006). Retro Rip-Offs: Some of the Most Egregious Plagiarisms in Classic Gaming. 1up.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  3. ^ Turner, Benjmain and Nutt, Christian (July 15, 2003). Nintendo Famicom: 20 Years of Fun. GameSpy. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  4. ^ Waugh, Eric-Jon Rossel (June 27, 2006). The Ten Greatest Years in Gaming. Next Generation. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  5. ^ Kalata, Kurt. Ninja Gaiden review. Classic Review Archive. Retrieved on 2006-08-25.
  6. ^ Nintendo Power. March/April 1989.
  7. ^ The Howard & Nester Comics Archive.
  8. ^ Nintendo Power. May/June 1989.
  9. ^ Nintendo Power, issues 6-9. May-December 1989.
  10. ^ Snow, Blake (June 18, 2006). Readers vote on top 10 NES games. Joystiq. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  11. ^ EGM Staff. (February 28, 2006) "The Top 25 Games EGM 25 Dissed!". EGM.
  12. ^ Nintendo Power, Vol. 198, p. 74. December 2005.
  13. ^ Sharkey, Scott (March 2004). Ninja Gaiden - Arcade vs. NES. 1up.com.
  14. ^ Nussbaum, Jeff. Ninja Ryukenden for PC Engine review. The Ninja Gaiden Homepage. Accessed on 2006-08-23.
  15. ^ Ninja Gaiden Trilogy review, reprinted at 1up.com. Electronic Gaming Monthly #73. August 1995.
  16. ^ Brightman, James (February 10, 2004). Ninja Gaiden Extras Confirmed...Again. GameDaily. Retrieved on 2006-08-23.
  17. ^ Buchanan, Levy (July 16, 2004). Ninja Gaiden Episode I: Destiny - Tecmo's classic ninja roars into action on handsets. IGN. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  18. ^ Tecmo 100% Games - Mobile. Accessed on 2006-08-10.
  19. ^ Score, Avery (Sept. 28, 2004). Ninja Gaiden Preview, Episodes II-IV. GameSpot.
  20. ^ Struck, Shawn and Sharkey, Scott (August 3, 2006). 8-Bit Lit: Inside the NES' Worlds of Power Series. 1up.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  21. ^ Nussbaum, Jeff. Miscellaneous. The Ninja Gaiden Homepage. Accessed on 2006-08-10.

1UP.com is a video-game site owned and operated by Ziff Davis Media, the media conglomerate behind popular videogame magazines Computer Gaming World (CGW) (now known as Games for Windows: The Official Magazine (or GFW) Magazine), Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM), and the now-defunct Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... Joystiq is a video gaming weblog founded in June 2004 that has since become one of the most successful sites within the Weblogs, Inc. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... IGN is a multimedia news and reviews website that focuses heavily on video games. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... GameSpot is a computer and video gaming website that was launched in May 1996 by Pete Deemer, Vince Broady, and Jon Epstein. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ...

External links

v  d  e
Ninja Gaiden video games

Ninja Gaiden (arcade) • Ninja Gaiden (NES) • II • III • Shadow • Trilogy • Ninja Gaiden (Xbox) MobyGames is a website devoted to cataloging computer and video games, both past and present. ... GameFAQs is a gaming website that has hosted FAQs and walkthroughs for gamers since November 1995. ... Ninja Gaiden (忍者外伝) is a series of video games by Tecmo featuring the dragon ninja, Ryu Hayabusa. ... It has been suggested that Multiplayer game be merged into this article or section. ... Ninja Gaiden is a 1988s arcade game released by Tecmo. ... This game was called Shadow Warriors in some places becuase of the too violent name Ninja Gaiden Shadow. It´s music is considered by some people to be some of the greatest game music ever. ... This is a compilation of the 3 Ninja Gaiden games on the NES with minor graphic and sound update and added a password system to the first game. ... Ninja Gaiden is a video game released for the Xbox featuring the Dragon Ninja, Ryu Hayabusa. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ninja Gaiden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1525 words)
The arcade version of Ninja Gaiden (released in 1988 in North America and 1989 in Japan) was a Double Dragon-style beat 'em up, in which the player controls a nameless ninja, as he travels to various regions of America (such as San Francisco, New York and Las Vegas) to defeat an evil cult.
The original Ninja Gaiden, a platformer, was released in Japan on December 9, 1988, in the United States in March, 1989, and in Europe on August 15, 1991.
For instance, in Ninja Gaiden II, the main character sprite is orange while the "split clones" are blue, a reversal of the original design.
Ninja - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3641 words)
Ninja and shinobi-no-mono, along with shinobi, another variant, became popular in the post-World War II phonetically with the kanji 志能備, has been traced as far back as Japan's Asuka period, when Prince Shotoku is alleged to have employed one of his retainers as a ninja.
Ninja as a group first began to be written about in 15th century feudal Japan as martial organizations predominately in the regions of Iga and Koga of central Japan, though the practice of guerilla warfare and undercover espionage operations goes back much further.
Ninja are said to have made use of weapons that could be easily concealed or disguised as common tools, the bo, and handclaws (shuko, neko-te tekagi) probably being the most famous, except for the amazing shuriken (throwing stars), popularized by comic book mail order advertisements.
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