FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
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Encyclopedia > Nineteenth century
Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century
Decades: 1800s 1810s 1820s 1830s 1840s 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s
Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical)

The 19th century lasted from 1801 to 1900 in the Gregorian calendar (using the Common Era system of year numbering). Common usage sometimes regards it as lasting from 1800 to 1899, but this is considered incorrect due to the nonexistence of a "Year Zero" before AD 1. The 19th century is also sometimes known as the eighteen hundreds (1800s), referring to the latter usage. Decades are almost always considered as starting with the "0" year and named accordingly ("1890s", etc.), so the first decade of a century technically overlaps back into the preceding one. These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ... Events and Trends Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1803 - 1815). ... Events and Trends End of the Napoleonic Wars in Europe (1803 - 1815). ... Events and Trends Nationalistic independence movements helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece declares independence from the Ottoman Empire (1821). ... Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria... Events and Trends Technology First use of anaesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long War, peace and politics First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi New Zealand. ... Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... Events and trends Italian unification under King Victor Emmanuel II. Wars for expansion and national unity continue until the incorporation of the Papal States (March 17, 1861 - September 20, 1870). ... Events and Trends Technology The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... // Events and Trends Technology Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... Nineteenth Century was a literary magazine founded in 1877 by Sir James Knowles. ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Gregorian calendar is the calendar widely used in the Western world. ... The Common Era (CE), also known as the Current Era and sometimes the Christian Era, is the period beginning with the year 1 onwards. ... Year numbering is the assignment of integers to calendar years for the purpose of naming the years. ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The presence or absence of year 0 is determined by convention among groups such as historians or astronomers. ... Events and Trends Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1803 - 1815). ...


Historians sometime use "Nineteenth Century" as a label for the era stretching from 1815 (The Congress of Vienna) to 1914 (The outbreak of the First World War). The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...

Contents


Events

1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Kingdom of Great Britain The Union Flag (1606-1800) The Kingdom of Great Britain, also sometimes known as the United Kingdom of Great Britain, was created by the merging of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England under the 1707 Act of Union to create a single kingdom... Capital Dublin Head of state King of Ireland Kings representative: Variously called Judiciar, Lord Deputy or Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Head of government: Chief Secretary for Ireland Parliament: Irish House of Commons and Irish House of Lords The Kingdom of Ireland was the name given to the English-ruled... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Barbary Wars were two wars between the United States of America and piratical city-states in North Africa. ... The states along the Barbary Coast, Algiers, Morocco, Tripoli, and Tunis, were collectively known as the Barbary States. ... North Africa is a region generally considered to include: Algeria Egypt Libya Mauritania Morocco Sudan Tunisia Western Sahara The Azores, Canary Islands, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Madeira are sometimes considered to be a part of North Africa. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... From Frank Bond, Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Meriwether Lewis, portrait by Charles Willson Peale Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery. ... William Clark (August 1, 1770 - September 1, 1838) was an explorer who accompanied Meriwether Lewis on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804–1806) was the first United States overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ... The Pacific Coast is any coast fronting the Pacific Ocean. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Muhammad `AlÄ« Muhammad `Ali; Pasha the Great; (many spelling variations, including Turkish Mehmet Ali (Kavalalı Mehmet Ali PaÅŸa), are encountered) (1769-August 2, 1849), was a viceroy of Egypt, and is sometimes considered the founder of modern Egypt. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Mexican War of Independence, which lasted from 1810 to 1821, was Mexicos struggle for independence against Spanish colonial rule. ... Events and Trends End of the Napoleonic Wars in Europe (1803 - 1815). ... Events and Trends Nationalistic independence movements helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece declares independence from the Ottoman Empire (1821). ... The South American Wars of Independence were fought in the 1810s and 1820s by colonies of Spain and Portugal that desired to break free from the nations that ruled them. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought on land in North America and at sea around the world between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ... Map of the Waterloo campaign The Battle of Waterloo, fought on June 18, 1815, was Napoleon Bonapartes last battle. ... The Napoleonic Wars was a series of wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule of France. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Year Without a Summer, also known as the Poverty Year and Eighteen hundred and froze to death was 1816, in which severe summer climate abnormalities destroyed crops in Northern Europe and the American Northeast. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Shaka Shaka (sometimes spelled Chaka) (ca. ... The Zulu are an African ethnic group of about 11 million people who live mainly in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was a joint-stock company of investors, which was granted a Royal Charter by Elizabeth I on December 31, 1600, with the intent to favour trade privileges in India. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The American Colonization Society (properly called The National Colonization Society of America) founded a colony on the coast of West Africa — Liberia, in 1820 — and transported free black people there, in an effort to remove them from the United States. ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Declaration of the War by Bishop Germanos at St. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... // French rule in Algeria, 1830–1962 Most of Frances actions in Algeria, not least the invasion of Algiers, were propelled by contradictory impulses. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Episode of the Belgian Revolution of 1830, Egide Charles Gustave Wappers (1834), in the Musée dArt Ancien, Brussels The Belgian Revolution was a conflict in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands that began with a riot in Brussels in August 1830 and eventually led to the establishment of... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Slavery Abolition Act was an 1833 act of the British Parliament abolishing slavery throughout the British Empire. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps The British Empire was the worlds first global power, a product of the European Age of Exploration that began with the global maritime empires of Portugal and Spain in the late 1400s. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... History of Spain Series Prehistoric Spain Roman Spain Medieval Spain Age of Reconquest Age of Expansion Age of Enlightenment Reaction and Revolution First Spanish Republic The Restoration Second Spanish Republic Spanish Civil War The Dictatorship Modern Spain Topics Economic History Military History Social History The Carlist Wars in Spain were... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Spanish Inquisition was the Inquisition acting in Spain under the control of the Kings of Spain. ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Texas Revolution was a war fought from October 2, 1835 to April 21, 1836 between Mexico and the Tejas portion of the Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877 until her death. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps The British Empire was the worlds first global power, a product of the European Age of Exploration that began with the global maritime empires of Portugal and Spain in the late 1400s. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian Era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... There were two Opium Wars between Britain and China. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Starvation during the famine The Great Famine or the Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór or An Drochshaol), known more commonly outside of Ireland as the Irish Potato Famine, is the name given to a famine in Ireland between 1845 and 1849. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... The Southwestern United States or simply the Southwest is a region of the United States that is drier in weather than the adjoining Southern United States and Western United States; the population is less dense and, with moderate Mexican and American Indian components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Communist Manifesto, also known as The Manifesto of the Communist Party, was first published on February 21, 1848, is one of the worlds most historically influential political tracts. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a series of revolutions triggered by the Revolution of 1848 in France, which erupted in February 1848 in Paris and soon spread to the rest of Europe. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... Gold rush handbill The California Gold Rush was a period in American history marked by mass hysteria concerning a gold discovery in Northern California. ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Events and trends Italian unification under King Victor Emmanuel II. Wars for expansion and national unity continue until the incorporation of the Papal States (March 17, 1861 - September 20, 1870). ... What is the price of the digging fee? The Victorian gold rush was a period in the history of Victoria in Australia between approximately 1851 and the early 1860s. ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Taiping Rebellion (1851–1864) was one of the bloodiest conflicts in history, a clash between the forces of Imperial China and those inspired by a Hakka self-proclaimed mystic named Hong Xiuquan (洪秀全), who was also a Christian convert. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... On March 31, 1854, the Convention of Kanagawa (Japanese: 神奈川条約, Kanagawa Jōyaku, or 日米和親条約, Nichibei Washin Jōyaku) was used by Commodore Matthew Perry of the U.S. Navy to force the opening of the Japanese ports of Shimoda and Hakodate to American trade and ended Japans 200 year policy... Sakoku (Japanese: 鎖国, literally country in chains) was the foreign relations policy of the Tokugawa shogunate, whereby nobody, whether foreign or Japanese, could enter or leave Japan on pain of death. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Crimean War 1853-6 The Crimean War lasted from 28 March 1854 until 1856. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (Ottoman Turkish for the Eternal State) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Ä°stanbul (Constantinople,Konstantiniyye) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 6. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Bessemer Converter, Schematic Diagram The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron. ... Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... View of the Tosco (ex Valero, originally Shell) Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... An engraving titled Sepoy Indian troops dividing the spoils after their mutiny against British rule gives a contemporary view of events from the British perspective. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The title page of the 1859 edition of On the Origin of Species. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Map of the division of the states during the Civil War. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured May... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The French intervention in Mexico was an invasion of Mexico by the army of France. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Cyrus Field was the instigator of the laying of the first transatlantic telegraph cable between North America and Europe August 5th 1858. ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... It has been suggested that Gastein Convention be merged into this article or section. ... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was a loose association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... The North German Confederation (German Norddeutscher Bund), a transitional grouping which existed (1867 - 1871) between the dissolution of the German Confederation and the founding of the German Empire, cemented Prussian control over the 22 states of Northern Germany and emanated that same control (via the Zollverein) into southern Germany. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Meiji Restoration (明治維新; Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Alaska Purchase from Russia by the United States occurred in 1867 at the behest of Secretary of State William Seward. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process that ultimately brought together a union among the provinces, colonies and territories of British North America to form the Dominion of Canada, a dominion of the British Empire, which today is the federal nation state called Canada. ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Poster announcing railroads opening The First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States was built across North America in the 1860s, linking the railway network of the eastern U.S. with California on the Pacific coast. ... 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1881 drawing of the Suez Canal The Suez Canal (Arabic, Qanā al-Suways), west of the Sinai Peninsula, is a 163-km maritime canal in Egypt between Port Said (BÅ«r SaÄ«d) on the Mediterranean Sea and Suez (al-Suways) on the Red Sea. ... Satellite image The Mediterranean Sea is a part of the Alanic Ocean almost completely enclosed by land, on the north by Europe, on the south by Africa, and on the east by Asia. ... Conshelf II in the Red Sea (Sudan) Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea (Arabic البحر الأحمر Baḥr al-Aḥmar, al-Baḥru l-’Aḥmar; Hebrew ים סוף Yam Suf; Tigrigna ቀይሕ ባሕሪ QeyH baHri) is a gulf or basin of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Franco-Prussian War (July 19, 1870 – May 10, 1871) was fought between France and Prussia (backed by the North German Confederation) allied with the south German states of Baden, Bavaria and Württemberg. ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Yellowstone National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was a joint-stock company of investors, which was granted a Royal Charter by Elizabeth I on December 31, 1600, with the intent to favour trade privileges in India. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Since the building of railroads they were the advance agents of industrialism, opening a national market for the first time and themselves providing a market for iron, steel, coal, and the products of related industries. ... Striking Teamsters defend themselves with pipes against armed police in the streets of Minneapolis, 1934. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (Ottoman Turkish for the Eternal State) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Ä°stanbul (Constantinople,Konstantiniyye) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 6. ... Plevna Monument near the walls of Kitai-gorod. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In the field of telecommunications, a telephone exchange (US: telephone switch) is a piece of equipment that connects phone calls. ... City nickname: The Elm City Location in the state of Connecticut Founded April 24, 1638 County New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Rorkes Drift The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between Britain and the Zulus, and signalled the end of the Zulus as an independent nation. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... The War of the Pacific was fought between Chile and the joint forces of Bolivia and Peru, from 1879 to 1884. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Boer guerrillas during the Second Boer War There were two Boer wars, one from December 16, 1880-March 23, 1881 and the second from October 11, 1899-May 31, 1902 both between the British and the settlers of Dutch, French and German origin (called Boers, Afrikaners or Voortrekkers) in South... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Pearl Street Station was the first central power plant. ... Electricity distribution is the penultimate process in the delivery of electric power, the part between transmission and user purchase from an electricity retailer. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Berlin Conference of 1884–85 regulated European colonisation and trade in Africa. ... The Scramble for Africa was the period between the 1880s and the start of World War I, when colonial empires in Africa proliferated more rapidly than anywhere else on the globe. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Wounded Knee massacre or the Battle of Wounded Knee was the last armed conflict between the Great Sioux Nation and the United States of America. ... The Indian Wars were a series of conflicts between the United States and Native American peoples (Indians) of North America. ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Japan and Qing China fought the First Sino–Japanese War (or the Qing-Japanese War or Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895)), primarily over control of Korea. ... Korea (한국/韓國/Hanguk, used by South / ì¡°ì„ /朝鮮/Joseon, used by North) is a formerly unified country, situated on the Korean Peninsula in northern East Asia, bordering on China to the northwest and Russia to the north. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The First Italo-Abyssinian War was one of the very few instances of successful armed African resistance to European colonialism in the 19th century. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the I Olympiad, were the first modern Summer Olympic Games and the first Games since Roman emperor Theodosius I banned the Ancient Olympic Games in AD 393 as part of the Christian campaign against paganism. ... The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A typical gold mining operation, on Bonanza Creek The Klondike Gold Rush was a frenzy of gold rush immigration to and gold prospecting in the Klondike near Dawson City in the Yukon Territory, Canada, after gold was discovered in the late 19th century. ... 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States of America gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ... 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Boxer forces in Tianjin The Boxer Uprising (Traditional Chinese: 義和團起義; Simplified Chinese: 义和团起义; pinyin: ; Righteous Harmony Society Uprising) was an uprising against Western commercial and political influence in China during the final years of the 19th century. ... The Eight-Nation Alliance (Chinese: 八國聯軍) was an alliance of 8 nations (Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States) which put out the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Link title1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... The Philippine-American War was a war between the armed forces of the United States and the Philippines from 1899 through 1913. ...

Significant people

Shrine of the Báb at night from above in Haifa, Israel Siyyid Mírzá Alí-Muhammad (میرزا علی‌محمد in Persian) (October 20, 1819 - July 9, 1850), was a merchant from Shiraz, Persia, who at the age of 25, claimed to be a new and independent Manifestation of God, and the promised... ... The room where The Báb declared His mission on May 23, 1844 in His house in Shiraz. ... Shrine of Baháulláh Mírzá Husayn-Alí (Persian: میرزا حسینعلی ) (b:1817-d:1892), who later took the title of Baháulláh (The Glory of God in Arabic) was the founder-prophet of the Baháí Faith. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís The Baháí Faith is an emerging global religion founded by Baháulláh, a nineteenth-century Iranian exile. ... Charles Baudelaire, photograph taken by Nadar. ... Henri Becquerel Antoine Henri Becquerel (December 15, 1852 – August 25, 1908) was a French physicist, Nobel laureate, and one of the discoverers of radioactivity. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770; died March 26, 1827) was a German composer of classical music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Prince Otto Eduard Leopold von Bismarck-Schönhausen, Duke of Lauenburg (April 1, 1815 – July 30, 1898) was one of the most prominent European aristocrats and statesmen of the nineteenth century. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ... Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of Romantic music, who predominantly lived in Vienna, Austria. ... Kate Chopin. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English poet, 1795 Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and as one of the Lake Poets. ... When Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species it shook the scientific world. ... Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction. ... A young Emily Dickinson, sometime around 1846-1847, for a long time the only known photograph of her. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák  listen (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of classical music. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 - October 18, 1931) was an inventor and businessman who developed many important devices. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was a famous American essayist and one of Americas most influential thinkers and writers. ... Michael Faraday Michael Faraday (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was a British scientist (a physicist and chemist) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ... Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege (November 8, 1848 – July 26, 1925) was a German mathematician, logician, and philosopher who is regarded as a founder of both modern mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. ... Antonio de La Gandara (December 16, 1861 - June 30, 1917) was a painter, pastellist and draughtsman. ... Garibaldi in 1866 Giuseppe Garibaldi (July 4, 1807 – June 2, 1882) was an Italian patriot and soldier of the Risorgimento. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Carl Friedrich Gauss (Gauß) (April 30, 1777 – February 23, 1855) was a German mathematician and scientist who contributed significantly to many fields, including number theory, analysis, differential geometry, geodesy, magnetism, astronomy and optics. ... Playwright/lyricist William S. Gilbert (1836-1911) and composer Arthur S. Sullivan (1842-1900) defined operetta or comic operas in Victorian England with a series of their internationally successful and timeless works known as the Savoy Operas. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe   Johann Wolfgang von Goethe? (pronounced [gø tÉ™, sometimes incorrectly pronunced Goth, Gurter and Gotha]) (August 28, 1749 – March 22, 1832) was a German novelist, dramatist, humanist, scientist, philosopher, and he conducted his civic services as a cabinet minister of Weimar. ... Self-portrait (1886) Vincent Willem van Gogh (March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890) was a Dutch painter, generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history. ... William Gilbert Grace (July 18, 1848–October 23, 1915) was an English cricketer who, by his extraordinary skills, made cricket perhaps the first modern spectator sport, and who developed most of the techniques of modern batting. ... Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was a Union general in the American Civil War and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... ... Nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne (July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... G.W.F. Hegel Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (August 27, 1770 - November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher born in Stuttgart, Württemberg, in present-day southwest Germany. ... Hóng Xiùquán (洪秀全, Wade-Giles: Hung Hsiu-chüan, born Hong Renkun 洪仁坤, Courtesy name Huoxiu 火秀; January 10, 1812-June 1, 1864) was a Hakka Chinese Christian who led the Taiping Rebellion and established the Heavenly Kingdom of Taiping, in which he was known as the Heavenly King (天王/T... Son of God is a biblical phrase from the Hebrew Bible, and the New Testament. ... Victor Hugo Victor-Marie Hugo (February 26, 1802–May 22, 1885) was a French author, designer, and artist. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767–June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ... ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797–1801) [[Vice President of the United States|Vice President, first (1789–1785) United States Secretary of State, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: ) (May 5, 1813 – November 11, 1855), a 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian, has achieved general recognition as the first existentialist philosopher, though some new research shows this may be a more difficult connection than previously thought. ... Libertadores or Liberators in the Spanish language, refers to the leaders of the revolutions which gained the nations of Latin America independence from Spain. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Robert Edward Lee, as a U.S. Army Colonel before the war Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured May... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... ... The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Fitz Hugh Ludlow, sometimes seen as Fitzhugh Ludlow, (September 11, 1836 – September 12, 1870) was an American author, journalist, and explorer; best-known for his autobiographical book The Hasheesh Eater (1857). ... Karl Marx Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883 London, UK) was an influential German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary organizer of the International Workingmens Association. ... James Clerk Maxwell (June 13, 1831–November 5, 1879) was a Scottish physicist, born in Edinburgh. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Gregor Johann Mendel Gregor Johann Mendel (July 22, 1822 – January 6, 1884) was an Austrian monk who is often called the father of genetics for his study of the inheritance of traits in pea plants. ... Florence Nightingale, OM (May 12, 1820 – August 13, 1910), who came to be known as The Lady with the Lamp, was the pioneer of modern nursing. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential classical liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the arts & crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Emperor Meiji (Mutsuhito) Mutsuhito (睦仁), the Meiji Emperor (明治天皇, literally Enlightened Rule Emperor) (3 November 1852–30 July 1912) was the 122nd Emperor of Japan. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) was a profoundly influential German philosopher, psychologist, and classical philologist. ... Saint Nikolai of Japan, Nikolai Kasatkin (born Ioan Dimitrovich Kasatkin August 1 of Julian calendar/ August 13 of Gregorian calendar, 1836 ; died February 16, 1912) was a Russian Orthodox priest, monk, and saint. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist. ... This daguerreotype of Poe was taken less than a year before his death at the age of 40. ... Sri Thakur Gadadhar Chattopadhyaya Ramakrishna Paramahamsa (Bangla: শ্রীরামকৄষ্ঞ পরমহংস) (February 18, 1836 - August 16, 1886) was a Bengali saint. ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ... Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Mormonism (also called Latter Day Saint theology or Mormon theology and Latter Day Saint culture or Mormon culture) is a religion, ethnic group, movement, ideology and subculture originating in the early 1800s as a product of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Dr. John Snow The English physician John Snow (March 15, 1813–June 16, 1858) was a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene, and a pioneer of epidemiology. ... Frederick Fred Spofforth (born in Balmain, Sydney on 9 September 1853, died in Surrey, England on 4 June 1926) also called the demon bowler was arguably the Australian cricket teams first and best pace bowler of the 19th century. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky   listen? (Russian: , Pëtr Ilič ÄŒajkovskij, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856 — circa January 7, 1943; baptismal name: Никола) was an inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. ... Leo Tolstoy, pictured late in life Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy   listen? (Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й; commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy) (September 9, 1828 – November 20, 1910; August 28, 1828 – November 7, 1910, O.S.) was a Russian novelist, social reformer, pacifist, Christian anarchist, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member... Mark Twain Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was a famous and popular American humorist, novelist, writer and lecturer. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (October 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was one of the great composers of Italian opera. ... Jules Verne. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877 until her death. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 in Leipzig – February 13, 1883 in Venice) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his groundbreaking symphonic-operas (or music dramas). His compositions are notable for their continuous contrapuntal texture, rich harmonies and orchestration, and elaborate... Walt Whitman Walt Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist born on Long Island, New York. ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was the second prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ...

Inventions, discoveries, introductions

List of 19th century inventions This is a chronological list of inventions. ...

Quadrupole (four-pole) magnet, focus particle beams in a particle accelerator. ... EPIDEMIOLOGY is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations (Rothman and Greenland), and the application of this study to control of health problems (Last 2001). ... Philology is the study of ancient texts and languages. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Mail order is a term which describes the buying of goods or services by mail delivery. ... This 1974 stamp from Japan depicts a Class 8620 steam locomotive. ... A bus is a large wheeled vehicle, intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver. ... Metro and Subway redirect here. ...

Decades and years

1790s 1790 1791 1792 1793 1794 1795 1796 1797 1798 1799
1800s 1800 1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 1809
1810s 1810 1811 1812 1813 1814 1815 1816 1817 1818 1819
1820s 1820 1821 1822 1823 1824 1825 1826 1827 1828 1829
1830s 1830 1831 1832 1833 1834 1835 1836 1837 1838 1839
1840s 1840 1841 1842 1843 1844 1845 1846 1847 1848 1849
1850s 1850 1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859
1860s 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869
1870s 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879
1880s 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889
1890s 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899
1900s 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
Romanticism
18th century - 19th century
Romantic music: Beethoven - Brahms - Strauss - Wagner
Romantic poetry: Blake - Burns - Byron - Goethe - Keats - Mickiewicz - Wordsworth
Romantic art - Copley - Goya - Hudson River School - Leutze
Romantic culture: Bohemianism - Romantic nationalism
...Preceded by the Age of Enlightenment Followed by Victorianism...
Followed by Modernism...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nineteenth Century Geometry (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) (5103 words)
During this period, the content of geometry and its internal diversity increased almost beyond recognition; the axiomatic method, vaunted since antiquity by the admirers of geometry, finally attained true logical sufficiency, and the ground was laid for replacing, in the description of physical phenomena, the standard geometry of Euclid by Riemann's wonderfully pliable system.
The present article reviews the aspects of nineteenth century geometry that are of major interest for philosophy and hints in passing, at their philosophical significance.
However, it had been practised in arithmetic for centuries, as the initial stock of natural numbers 1, 2, 3, …, was supplemented with zero, the negative integers, the non-integral rationals, the irrationals, and the so-called imaginary numbers.
Color Printing: Introduction (286 words)
Color Printing in the Nineteenth Century, a new exhibition in the Special Collections Exhibition Gallery of the Morris Library, University of Delaware, is curated by Iris Snyder of the Special Collections Department.
The nineteenth century was the turning point for technical development in color illustration.
Color Printing in the Nineteenth Century documents these changes in color printing technology by displaying some of the finest examples of books illustrated in color, published from the last quarter of the eighteenth century until the beginning of the twentieth century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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