FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Nikolaus Lenau
Lenau in 1839
Lenau in 1839

Nikolaus Lenau was the nom de plume of Nikolaus Franz Niembsch von Strehlenau (August 25, 1802 - August 22, 1850), an Austrian poet. Image File history File links Lenau. ... Image File history File links Lenau. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... --69. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ...


He was born at Csatád near Temesvar in Hungary, now Lenauheim in Romania. His father, a government official, died at Budapest in 1807, leaving his children in the care of their mother, who in 1811 married again. In 1819 Nikolaus went to the University of Vienna; he subsequently studied Hungarian law at Bratislava and then spent the best part of four years in qualifying himself in medicine. Unable to settle down to any profession, he had already begun to write verse; and the disposition to sentimental melancholy inherited from his mother, stimulated by disappointments in love and by the prevailing fashion of the romantic school of poetry, descended into gloom after his mother's death in 1829. Map of Romania showing Timisoara Timişoara (Hungarian: Temesvár, German: Temeswar or Temeschburg, Serbian: Temišvar, Turkish: Tamışvar) is a city in western Romania, in the Banat region, Timiş county, population 329,554 in 2000. ... Budapest seen from north. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... University of Vienna, main building, seen from Beethovens apartment The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) in Austria was founded in 1365 by Rudolph IV and hence named Alma mater Rudolphina. ... Bratislava (until 1919: PreÅ¡porok in Slovak, Pressburg in German and English; Pozsony in Hungarian) is the capital of Slovakia and the countrys largest city, with a population of some 450,000. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Soon afterwards, a legacy from his grandmother enabled him to devote himself wholly to poetry. His first published poems appeared in 1827, in JG Seidl's Aurora. In 1831 he went to Stuttgart, where he published a volume of Gedichte (1832) dedicated to the Swabian poet, Gustav Schwab. Here he also made the acquaintance of Ludwig Uhland, Justinus Kerner, Karl Mayerl and others; but his restless spirit longed for change, and he determined to seek for peace and freedom in America. 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Stuttgart, a city located in southern Germany, is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg with a population of approximately 590,000 as of September 2005 in the city and around 3 million in the metropolitan area. ... Gustav Benjamin Schwab (June 19, 1792 - November 4, 1850) was the author of Gods and Heroes of Ancient Greece. ... Johann Ludwig Uhland (April 26, 1787 - November 13, 1862), was a German poet. ... Justinus Andreas Christian Kerner (September 18, 1786 - February 21, 1862), was a German poet and medical writer. ... ...


In October 1832 he landed at Baltimore and settled on a homestead in Ohio. But the reality of life in the primeval forest fell lamentably short of the ideal he had pictured; he disliked the Americans with their eternal English lisping of dollars (englisches Talergelispel); and in 1833 he returned to Germany, where the appreciation of his first volume of poems revived his spirits. From then on he lived partly in Stuttgart and partly in Vienna. In 1836 appeared his Faust, in which he laid bare his own soul to the world; in 1837, Savonarola, an epic in which freedom from political and intellectual tyranny is insisted upon as essential to Christianity. In 1838 his Neuere Gedichte proved that Savonarola had been the result of a passing exaltation. Of these new poems, some of the finest were inspired by his hopeless passion for Sophie von Löwenthal, the wife of a friend. In 1842 appeared Die Albigenser, and in 1844 he began writing his Don Juan, a fragment of which was published after his death. Soon afterwards his never well-balanced mind began to show signs of aberration, and in October 1844 he was placed under restraint. He died in the asylum at Oberdöbling near Vienna. 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the city in the US state of Maryland. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs, Czech: Vídeň, Slovak: Viedeň, Romany Vidnya; Serbian: Beč) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine states (Land Wien). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Faust or Faustus is the protagonist of a popular German tale that has been used as the basis for many different fictional works. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Beliefs Though enormous diversity exists in the beliefs of those who self-identify as Christian, it is possible to venture general statements which describe the beliefs of a large majority . ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Don Juan is a legendary fictional libertine, whose story has been told many times by different authors. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Lenau's fame rests mainly upon his shorter poems; even his epics are essentially lyric in quality. He is the greatest modern lyric poet of Austria, and the typical representative in German literature of that pessimistic Weltschmerz which, beginning with Lord Byron, reached its culmination in the poetry of Giacomo Leopardi. Epic can mean: Epic poetry, a style of poetry EPIC, an abbreviation Epic Age, a time period in Indian history Epic, a series of wargames Epic Records, a record label Epic Comics, an imprint of Marvel Comics Epic Illustrated, an anthology series published by Marvel Comics Epic Games, a computer... Weltschmerz (from the German language meaning world-pain or world-weariness, see wiktionary entry) is a term coined by the German author Jean Paul and denotes the kind of feeling experienced by someone who understands that the physical reality can never satisfy the demands of the mind. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Giacomo Leopardi Giacomo Leopardi, Count (June 29, 1798 – June 14, 1837) was a major Italian Romantic poet, often considered alongside Dante and Petrarch as Italys greatest poets. ...


Lenau's Sämtliche Werke were first published in 4 vols. by A. Grun (1855).


Reference

Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ...

External links

  • Internationale Lenau-Gesellschaft (in German)
  • Nicolaus Lenau Links
Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Nikolaus Lenau

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nikolaus Lenau - definition of Nikolaus Lenau in Encyclopedia (540 words)
Nikolaus Lenau was the nom de plume of Nikolaus Franz Niembsch von Strehlenau (August 25, 1802 - August 22, 1850), and Austrian poet.
In 1819 Nikolaus went to the University of Vienna; he subsequently studied Hungarian law at Bratislava and then spent the best part of four years in qualifying himself in medicine.
Lenau's fame rests mainly upon his shorter poems; even his epics are essentially lyric in quality.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m