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Encyclopedia > Nike (mythology)
This article discusses the Greek Goddess. For the sports apparel and equipment company, see Nike, Inc.
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Other deities
Personified concepts

In Greek mythology, Nike (pronounced /ˈnaɪkiː/; Greek Νίκη pronounced [níːkɛː], meaning Victory), was a goddess who personified triumph throughout the ages of the ancient Greek culture. Depending upon the time of various myths, she was described as the daughter of Pallas (Titan) and Styx (Water), and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and of Zelus (Rivalry). Nike and her siblings all became described as attendants of Zeus when his cult gained the position of the dominant deity of the Greek pantheon and the roles of older deities were changed in new myths. According to classical (later) myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War against the older deities. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Her Roman counterpart is Victoria. Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Nike, Inc. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek , transliterated AsklÄ“piós; Latin Aesculapius) is the demigod of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... In Greek mythology, the Oneiroi were the sons of Hypnos, the god of sleep. ... In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... In Greek mythology, Eros was the god responsible for lust, love, and sex; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. ... Daughter of Nyx in Greek mythology, Apate was the personification of deceit. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Eris (ca. ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent was known as Somnus . ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... Triumph is a British car brand (see Triumph Motor Company), as well as a motorcycle brand (see Triumph Motorcycles). ... For other meanings of Pallas, see Pallas (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Styx (Στυξ) is the name of a river which formed the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, Hades. ... Kratos may refer to: Cratos, a son of Zeus in Greek myth Operation Kratos, a codeword for SO13 tactics for dealing with terrorists Kratos MS 50, a tool for Electron ionization Kratos, the main protagonist in the video game series, God of War Kratos Aurion, a character from the Tales... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: ), was the eleven-year [notes] series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ... Victoria on the reverse of this coin by Constantine II. In Roman mythology, Victoria was the goddess of victory. ...


Worship

Second century AD copy of the head of Nike - original by Paionios, 5th century BC.
Second century AD copy of the head of Nike - original by Paionios, 5th century BC.
Nike acroterion from the Temple of Artemis, Epidaurus, late 4th century BC.
Nike acroterion from the Temple of Artemis, Epidaurus, late 4th century BC.

Worship of the goddess Nike included processions, libations, or sacrifices that were performed to elicit the favour of Nike. Petitions in the form of prayers could be presented to the priestesses officiating in the temples, who would communicate these to the goddess at the sacred oracles. If an answer was received from the goddess it would be presented to the petitioner by the priestess. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1518 × 1878 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1518 × 1878 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 310 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (512 × 990 pixels, file size: 236 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 310 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (512 × 990 pixels, file size: 236 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... An acroterion or acroterium is an ornament placed on a plinth or acroter at the apex of the pediment of a building in the Classical style. ... Panoramic view of the theater at Epidaurus Epidaurus (Epidauros) was a small city (polis) in ancient Greece at the Saronic Gulf. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... This article is about prophetic oracles in various cultures. ...

Reconstruction of Nike standing in the hand of the gigantic statue of Athene in the Parthenon.

Temples also were used as banks and could store coins for safekeeping. The great statue of Athena Parthenos in the Parthenon in Athens is thought to have depicted Nike standing in the hand of the gigantic statue. This Nike statue was made of solid gold, which was (along with the gold plating of the Parthenos statue) the Athenian state's official gold deposit in the form of a "sacred treasury". Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 175 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The name of this media object is misspelled, incomplete, misleading, cryptic, or does not conform to an established naming convention. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 175 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The name of this media object is misspelled, incomplete, misleading, cryptic, or does not conform to an established naming convention. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ...


The Parthenon complex also included a Temple of Athena Nike, built around 410 BC. The Athenians dedicated a statue to Nike at Delphi also. The statue of Zeus at Olympia reportedly depicted Nike as well. On occasions, Athena was depicted with Nike's attributes. According to Pausanias, the statue of Athena Nike depicted a wingless Nike ("Nike Apteros"), supposedly so that the statue could never leave the city of Athens. Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 415 BC 414 BC 413 BC 412 BC 411 BC - 410 BC - 409 BC 408 BC 407... For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...


This temple at Olympia also has provided a famous surviving depiction of the goddess, Nike unfastening her sandal ("Nike Slancio"), which originally was part of the temple parapet. This statue is now on display in the Acropolis Museum in Athens. Another Nike statue, the headless Winged Victory of Samothrace, is featured in the Louvre. Nike also is depicted standing in the hand of another statue of Athena in the temple of Zeus in Malaki. Nike is on the old FIFA world cup trophy This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Winged Victory of Samothrace The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. ... This article is about the museum. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mythography | The Greek Goddess Nike in Myth and Art (382 words)
The Greek goddess Nike was the personification of victory in mythology.
Despite her ancestry, Nike fought on the side of the Olympian gods against the Titans, and thus was considered a manifest representation of the victory of the Olympians.
This did not mean that Nike's powers were confined to the military sphere: quite the contrary, in fact, for she symbolized victory in many areas of ancient Greek life, including athletics (perhaps this is why the legendary shoe manufacturer borrowed the name of this goddess) and other contests.
Nike (2121 words)
According to Greek mythology Nike sat at the side of Zeus, the ruler of the Olympian pantheon of Mount Olympus.
Nike is the 20th century footwear and athletic apparel that lifts the world's greatest athletes to new levels of mastery and achievement.
Since NIKE watches are water resistant, it is important that the watch be properly water tested whenever the case back is removed to ensure this resistance level is preserved.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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