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Encyclopedia > Night Court
Night Court

The fourth season cast of Night Court. Front row, left to right: John Larroquette, Harry Anderson, Markie Post. Back row, left to right: Charles Robinson, Richard Moll, Marsha Warfield
Genre Sitcom
Created by Reinhold Weege
Starring Harry Anderson
John Larroquette
Markie Post (1985-92)
Richard Moll
Charles Robinson (1985-92)
Marsha Warfield (1986-92)
Selma Diamond (1984-85)
Florence Halop (1985-86)
Ellen Foley (1984-1985)
Karen Austin (1984)
Paula Kelly (1984)
Opening theme by Jack Elliott
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of episodes 193
Production
Running time 30 minutes
(with commercials)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Original run January 4, 1984May 31, 1992
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Night Court was an American television situation comedy that aired on NBC from January 1984 until May 1992. The setting for the show was the night shift of a court in Manhattan, presided over by the young, unorthodox Judge Harry Stone (played by Harry Anderson). DVD cover for 1st season of the sitcom Night Court This is a DVD cover. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Reinhold Weege is an American television writer, producer and director. ... Harry Anderson (born October 14, 1952) is an American actor and magician. ... John Bernard Larroquette (born November 25, 1947) is an American Emmy Award-winning film and television actor. ... Marjorie Armstrong Post (born on November 4, 1950, in Palo Alto, California) is an actress, best known for her 1985–1992 role as Christine Sullivan on the NBC sitcom Night Court. ... Richard Moll (born January 13, 1943) is an American actor. ... Charlie Robinson (born November 9, 1945, in Houston, Texas) is a television actor who has been performing since the 1960s. ... Marsha Warfield (born March 5, 1954, in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an African-American actress best remembered for her 1986-1992 role on the popular NBC sitcom Night Court. ... Selma Diamond (August 5, 1920 - May 13, 1985) was a Canadian-born comedic actress and TV writer. ... Florence Halop (b. ... Ellen Foley (born 1951, St. ... Karen Austin (1954 - ) is an American actress from Welch, West Virginia. ... Paula Kelly (born October 21, 1943 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an Emmy Award-nominated African-American dancer and actress in motion pictures and television. ... Ramblin Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliot (born Elliott Charles Adnopoz, August 1, 1931) is an American folk performer. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A night shift is either a group of workers who work during the night, or the period in which they work. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Harry Anderson (born October 14, 1952) is an American actor and magician. ...


Night Court was created by comedy writer Reinhold Weege, who had previously worked on the award-winning and wry series Barney Miller in the 1970s and early 1980s. Some who began watching Night Court at its premiere were expecting a similar program, especially since they both began with a catchy bassline and featured law-enforcement personnel in New York City, but Night Court was a distinctly sillier show. Reinhold Weege is an American television writer, producer and director. ... Barney Miller was a comedy television series set in a New York City police station that ran from January 23, 1975, to May 20, 1982 on ABC. It was created by Danny Arnold (who also did work on Gilligans Island and The Brady Bunch) and Theodore J. Flicker. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In popular music a bassline, also bass line, is an instrumental part, or line, which is in the bass or lowest range and thus lower than the other parts and part of the rhythm section. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Contents

Description

Night Court, according to the first season DVD, was created without comedian/magician Harry Anderson in mind, but Anderson auditioned with the claim that he was Harry Stone. Anderson had developed a following with his performances on Saturday Night Live and made several successful appearances as "Harry the Hat" on another NBC sitcom, Cheers. (For the first several years of its run, Night Court aired on NBC Thursday nights after Cheers.) In later seasons, while Anderson remained the key figure, John Larroquette became the breakout personality, winning a number of awards and many fans for his performance as the lecherous Dan Fielding. A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90 minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Cheers is a popular American situation comedy produced by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with CBS Paramount Television for NBC. Cheers was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. ... John Bernard Larroquette (born November 25, 1947) is an American Emmy Award-winning film and television actor. ...


The comedy style on Night Court could best be described as broad, almost slapstick comedy. The main characters had personality quirks which made them slightly off-kilter. Logic and realism were frequently abandoned for the sake of a joke: cartoon animal Wile E. Coyote (a Warner Bros. property, like Night Court) once appeared in a brief gag as a defendant ("I know you're hungry, but leave the poor bird alone!"). A typical plot might have Judge Stone trying to stop a group of rival ventriloquists and their dummies from assaulting each other, (then NBC chairman) Brandon Tartikoff bailing out a Nielsen family so they could get home to watch Misfits of Science, or Harry pushing the court staff to meet a deadline of 200 cases to be adjudicated before midnight. Slapstick is a type of comedy involving exaggerated physical violence. ... Wile E. (Ethelbert) Coyote (also known simply as The Coyote) and the Road Runner are cartoon characters from a series of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons, created by Chuck Jones in 1948 for Warner Brothers. ... Warner Bros. ... A defendant or defender is any party who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff or pursuer in a civil lawsuit before a court, or any party who has been formally charged or accused of violating a criminal statute. ... Look up plot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen and his best-known sidekick, Charlie McCarthy. ... Brandon Tartikoff (January 13, 1949 — August 27, 1997) was a popular NBC executive who was credited with turning around NBCs low prime time reputation with such hit series as Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law, ALF, Family Ties, The Cosby Show, Cheers, Miami Vice, The Golden Girls, Knight Rider... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... Mark Thomas Miller and Courteney Cox in Misfits of Science Misfits of Science was a short-lived American superhero fantasy television series that aired on NBC Fridays at 8 PM EST from October, 1985 to February, 1986. ...


The show featured several defendants who appeared before the court again and again - notably the Wheelers (Mr. Wheeler was played by Brent Spiner), who initially pretended to be hicks from West Virginia but were later revealed as Yugoslavians, and at one point even ran a concession stand in the courthouse. Brent Jay Spiner (born February 2, 1949) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of the android Lieutenant Commander Data in the television and movie series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: Land of the South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Concession stand is the term used to refer to a place where patrons can purchase snacks or food at a theatre, fair, or other event. ...


Episodes

This is a list of episodes for the NBC sitcom Night Court. ...

Primary cast

  • Harry Anderson as Judge Harry Stone, a young, good-humored jurist and an amateur magician whose father was a former mental patient. Harry loved movies and fashions from the 1940s, and idolized crooner Mel Tormé.
  • The public defenders:
    • Gail Strickland as Sheila Gardner (in the pilot episode only).
    • Paula Kelly as Liz Williams (in the first season only, after the pilot).
    • Ellen Foley as Billie Young (in the second season only). A romantic interest for Harry Stone.
    • Markie Post as Christine Sullivan (from the third season until the show's end), who, though attractive and voluptuous, was honest to a fault and somewhat naïve. The primary romantic interest for Harry Stone throughout the series' run.
  • John Larroquette as Dan Fielding, a sex-obsessed narcissistic prosecutor who would do anything to get a woman to sleep with him.
  • The bailiffs:
    • Richard Moll as Bull Shannon, a (seemingly) dim-witted hulk of a figure who was actually gentle and often childlike. He was known for his catchphrase, "Ohh-kay".
    • The various female bailiffs (the first two of whom died early in the show's run), who were acerbic and comically gruff:
  • The court clerks:
    • Karen Austin as Lana Wagner (in the first season only). The original romantic interest for Harry Stone.
    • D.D. Howard as Charly Tracy. Clerk for the last two episodes of the first season after Lana Wanger's departure from the show.
    • Charles Robinson as Mac Robinson (from the second season until the show's end), a veteran of the Vietnam War, who was very sweet and would do anything for anyone. He always wore a cardigan, plaid shirt, and a knit tie.
  • Denice Kumagai as Quon Le Duc Robinson (occasional from second season on), Mac's wife, a refugee from Vietnam who was somewhat naive about America and its customs, but was loving and very devoted to him.
  • Mike Finneran as Art Fensterman (occasional throughout the entire run), a bumbling "fix-it man" attached to the courthouse
  • Joleen Lutz as Lisette Hocheiser (occasional last two seasons), a ditzy court reporter.

Harry Anderson (born October 14, 1952) is an American actor and magician. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Left To Right, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Dean Martin Crooner is an epithet given to a male singer of a certain style of popular songs, dubbed pop standards. ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ... Gail Strickland (born on 18 May 1947 in Birmingham, Alabama, USA) is an American actress. ... Paula Kelly (born October 21, 1943 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an Emmy Award-nominated African-American dancer and actress in motion pictures and television. ... Ellen Foley (born 1951, St. ... Marjorie Armstrong Post (born on November 4, 1950, in Palo Alto, California) is an actress, best known for her 1985–1992 role as Christine Sullivan on the NBC sitcom Night Court. ... John Bernard Larroquette (born November 25, 1947) is an American Emmy Award-winning film and television actor. ... This article is about narcissism as a word in common use. ... The prosecutor is the chief legal representative of the prosecution in countries adopting the common law adversarial system or the civil law inquisitorial system. ... Richard Moll (born January 13, 1943) is an American actor. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Selma Diamond (August 5, 1920 - May 13, 1985) was a Canadian-born comedic actress and TV writer. ... Florence Halop (b. ... Marsha Warfield (born March 5, 1954, in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an African-American actress best remembered for her 1986-1992 role on the popular NBC sitcom Night Court. ... Karen Austin (1954 - ) is an American actress from Welch, West Virginia. ... Charlie Robinson (born November 9, 1945, in Houston, Texas) is a television actor who has been performing since the 1960s. ... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... A cardigan (or Old Man Sweater) is a type of sweater/jumper with buttons down the front; by contrast, a pullover does not open in front, but forms a solid tube around the torso. ... This article is about the court reporters who are human beings transcribing sworn proceedings. ...

Supporting players and notable cameos

  • John Astin appeared occasionally as Harry's eccentric father Buddy, a former patient in a psychiatric hospital. His catchphrase was the capper to stories involving his hospital stay or past strange behavior: "...but I'm feeling much better now."
  • Mel Tormé played himself in several appearances (in the first episode, it is revealed that Harry is a fanatic of his).
  • William Utay played Dan's homeless lackey Phil Sanders (and, later, Phil's evil twin brother Will).
  • Brent Spiner (who later gained greater fame as Data in Star Trek: The Next Generation) played Bob Wheeler in a recurring role.

John Allen Astin (born March 30, 1930) is an Oscar nominated American actor who has appeared in numerous films and television shows, but is best known for the role of Gomez Addams on The Addams Family television series and similarly eccentric comedic characters. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ... other usages: Evil twin (wireless networks) Bart and Hugo Simpson, good and evil twins. ... Brent Jay Spiner (born February 2, 1949) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of the android Lieutenant Commander Data in the television and movie series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ...

Cast changes

The first few seasons of Night Court had an unusually large number of cast changes for such a long-running series. The only actors to appear consistently throughout the show's run were Harry Anderson, John Larroquette, and Richard Moll.

  • When Selma Diamond, the first female bailiff, died after two seasons, Florence Halop played a replacement character, only to die one season later. Night Court scripts addressed the deaths of both characters, which was uncharacteristic for a sitcom. There were whispers and jokes that both actresses had fallen prey to some sort of "Night Court Curse"; this is said to be one of the reasons that the show decided not to bring in a third elderly actress and instead replaced Halop with Marsha Warfield, who played Roz Russell. All three characters were written as mother-figures for Bull. Warfield's arrival marked the show's final cast change, and the ensemble remained intact for the remainder of the show's run.
  • Karen Austin only appeared as Lana Wagner for the first ten episodes, after which her character was only subsequently mentioned in the eleventh episode as "out sick" by a one-time character, and never again by regular cast members. She was kept in the titles of the remaining three episodes of the first season. Also cut from the show after the first season was Paula Kelly; the public defender role was filled by Ellen Foley for the second season, after which she in turn was replaced by Markie Post. The character of Lana had been planned to be a romantic interest for Harry Stone, but when Austin departed, that role was transferred to the new public defender characters.

Awards

During its nine season run, Night Court received a number of award and nominations. Both Selma Diamond (in 1985) and John Larroquette (in 1988) earned Golden Globe nominations, but lost to Faye Dunaway and Rutger Hauer respectively. The show has had more success with the Emmys and the first season earned a nomination for Paula Kelly. While the second season came around, the show had more success with the fans and critics and higher recognition came from the Academy of Television Arts. John Larroquette won four consecutive Emmys for best supporting actor in a comedy series from 1985 to 1988, before he withdrew his name from the ballot in 1989. Selma Diamond also earned a nomination in 1985, as a tribute for her sudden death, and the show's star Harry Anderson earned three consecutive nominations (from 1985 to 1987). The show earned three nominations for best comedy series, in 1985, 1987, and 1988. The show also received many minor awards and nominations in the areas of lighting, editing, sound mixing, and technical direction. In total, the show was nominated for thirty-one Emmys, winning seven. Faye Dunaway (born January 14, 1941, in Bascom, Florida) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ...


DVD releases

Season releases


Night Court proved to be unpopular with modern viewers, as the DVD release had very low sales and led the release schedules to be put on standstill. A year later, a "Best-Of" single was released to test the series, but that proved to be unpopular.

DVD Name Release Date Ep# Additional Info
The Complete First Season February 8, 2005 13
  • Interviews with Reinhold Weege and Harry Anderson.
  • Episode commentary on pilot.

Special releases is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

DVD Name Cover Art Release Date Ep# Additional Info
Television Favorites February 28, 2006 6
  • None

February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Trivia

  • Richard Moll had originally shaved his head for a role in the 1983 science fiction B-movie Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn. Producers liked the look for Bull, so he continued shaving his head for Night Court.
  • This was one of the few live-action series to feature a brief animated character (Wile E. Coyote) in an episode.
  • John Larroquette's character was called "Dan Fielding" almost exclusively, although his full name was quite different. When his parents visit him "from Paris" (Louisiana; Dan's father named the town after the city where he was stationed in World War II...Paris, Texas), they mention that his last name was "Elmore" and his middle name was "Fielding". In a different episode, where pregnant women and their spouses are stuck in the courtroom during a hurricane, Dan admits to one of the mothers that his first name is "Reinhold." (His coworkers would not learn his name until several years later, when a vengeful high school classmate of Dan's reveals it to them along with the fact that Dan used to play the accordion.) This was a nod to the unusual first name of the show's creator, Reinhold Weege. A second season episode gave Dan's middle initial as "K" but became "R" (presumably for Reinhold) after the revelation of his real given name
  • Although often portrayed as a simpleton, character Bull Shannon had a tested I.Q. of 181. When the results are given to him, he initially reads the page upside-down, and is subsequently surprised to find that 181 looks the same both ways.
  • Harry Stone was the youngest judge appointed to the bench in New York. According to Stone, he was selected because the mayor was filling all open seats on the last day of his term, and Stone was the only nominee on the list at home to answer his phone (it was a Sunday). Some trivia pages list this as being Super Bowl Sunday, but that was never stated, and would not coincide with when a Mayor of New York's term would end.
  • Judge Harry Stone's most frequent sentencing was "$50 fine and time served", a joke was made of it in an episode where the entire courtroom said it along with him.
  • Night Court was known as having one of the tallest male casts in the history of television, with Richard Moll at 6' 7 1/2", John Larroquette and Harry Anderson at 6'4" and Charles Robinson at 6'2".
  • Shelley Hack was originally slated for the role of Christine Sullivan in Season Two, but was dropped after two days' filming when producer Weege decided she wasn't right for the part. Markie Post was picked as her replacement, but had a year left on her contract with ABC (where she was appearing on The Fall Guy); Ellen Foley (as Billie Young) served as a temporary replacement until Post became available.
  • The theme of Night Court was performed on an episode of Family Guy by Bill Clinton and his secret service for "saxophone therapy" for Peter who had been injured while trying to lift Clinton's car.
  • In a classic episode of South Park where Cartman enters a Cheesy Poof jingle contest, he sings "I love Cheesy Poofs/You love Cheesy Poofs/If there were no Cheesy Poofs/we'd be lame/I'm talking Night Court in its 5th season laaaaaaaaaaaaame"
  • The seventh season of the series was originally intended to be its last. Then NBC renewed the show, forcing producers to come up with a new "final" eighth season, which meant changing the "finished" storylines from the previous year. Which they had to do again for the really, truly final ninth season.
  • Bull's given name is Nostradamus, so named because his mother "always loved that hunchback." Bull prefers no one correct her mistaken identification of Quasimodo.
  • On an Episode of Night Court, Bull recites the Opening Words from Days of our Lives Just Before the Theme Song Plays.
  • Richard Moll, John Larroquette and Harry Anderson are the only three actors to be on the show from the first to final season.

Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote The Road Runner cartoons are a series of Looney Tunes cartoons created by Chuck Jones for Warner Brothers. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Paris is a city located 98 miles (158 km) northeast of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex in Lamar County, Texas, in the United States. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ... IQ tests are designed to give approximately this Gaussian distribution. ... NY redirects here. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Shelley Hack in Falling from the Sky: Flight 174 Shelley Hack (born July 6, 1947 in Greenwich, Connecticut) is an American actress who is known for her short-lived role as Tiffany Welles on Charlies Angels. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The Fall Guy was an American television series produced for ABC. It ran from 1981 to 1986 and starred Lee Majors, Heather Thomas and Douglas Barr. ... Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other uses, see South Park (disambiguation). ... Eric Cartman on his tricycle Eric Theodore Cartman, voiced by Trey Parker, is a fictional character in the animated series South Park. ... Cameron Giles (born February 4, 1976), better known as Camron, or Killa Cam, is a platinum selling rapper from Harlem in New York City. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... Christopher Lee Rios (November 9, 1971–February 7, 2000), better known as Big Punisher or Big Pun, was a New York rapper of Puerto Rican descent who emerged from the underground rap scene in The Bronx in the late 1990s. ... Nelust Wyclef Jean (IPA pronunciation: ) (born October 17, 1972) is a Grammy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated Haitian-born American rapper, producer, and member of the hip hop trio The Fugees. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Nostradamus: original portrait by his son Cesar Michel de Nostredame (December 14, 1503 – July 2, 1566), usually Latinized to Nostradamus, was a French apothecary and reputed seer who published collections of prophecies that have since become famous world-wide. ... Hunchback may refer to one of the following. ... For the Rap Artist see Quasimoto. ... Days of our Lives is an American soap opera, which has aired nearly every weekday since November 8, 1965[2] on the NBC network in the United States, and has since been syndicated to many countries around the world. ...

External link

  • Night Court on TVLand.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
Night Court - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1206 words)
Night Court was an American television situation comedy that aired on NBC from January 1984 until May 1992.
Night Court was originally developed as a vehicle for comedian/magician Harry Anderson.
Night Court was known as having one of the tallest male casts in the history of television, with Richard Moll at 6' 7 1/2", John Larroquette and Harry Anderson at 6'4" and Charles Robinson at 6'2".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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