FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Nicodemus
Saint Stephen Mourned by Saints Gamaliel and Nicodemus, follower of Carlo Saraceni, c. 1615 (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).
Saint Stephen Mourned by Saints Gamaliel and Nicodemus, follower of Carlo Saraceni, c. 1615 (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).

Nicodemus (Greek: Νικόδημος) was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, who, according to the Gospel of John, showed favour to Jesus. He appears three times in the Gospel: the first is when he visits Jesus one night to listen to his teachings (John 3:1-21); the second is when he states the law concerning the arrest of Jesus during the Feast of Tabernacles (John 7:45-51); and the last follows the Crucifixion, when he assists Joseph of Arimathea in preparing the corpse of Jesus for burial (John 19:39-42). Image File history File links Follower of Carlo Saraceni, Italian (Venetian), about 1579–1620 Saint Stephen Mourned by Saints Gamaliel and Nicodemus about 1615 Oil on canvas 113. ... Image File history File links Follower of Carlo Saraceni, Italian (Venetian), about 1579–1620 Saint Stephen Mourned by Saints Gamaliel and Nicodemus about 1615 Oil on canvas 113. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... The Pharisees (from the Hebrew perushim, from parash, meaning to separate) were, depending on the time, a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought among Jews that flourished during the Second Temple Era (536 BCE–70 CE). ... For the tractate in the Mishnah, see Sanhedrin (tractate). ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Sukkot (Hebrew:  ; booths. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ...


The discussion with Jesus is the source of several common expressions of contemporary Christianity, specifically, the descriptive phrase born again used to describe the experience of believing in Jesus as Saviour, and John 3:16, a commonly quoted verse used to describe God's plan of salvation. Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ... John 3:16 (chapter 3, verse 16 of the Gospel of John) is one of the most widely quoted verses from the Christian Bible. ...


An apocryphal work under his name — the Gospel of Nicodemus — was produced at some point in the medieval era, and is mostly a reworking of the earlier Acts of Pilate, which recounts the harrowing of Hell. Apocrypha (from the Greek word , meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... The Acts of Pilate, also known as the Gospel of Nicodemus, is a book of the New Testament apocrypha. ... The Acts of Pilate (Latin Acta Pilati) is a book of the New Testament apocrypha. ... The Harrowing of Hell is a doctrine in Christian theology referenced in the Apostles Creed and the Athanasian Creed (Quicumque vult), which states that Jesus descended into Hell. His descent to the underworld has been termed the most controversial phrase in the Apostles Creed. ...


Though there is no clear source of information about this Nicodemus outside the Gospel of John, the Jewish Encyclopedia and many Biblical historians have theorised that he is identical to Nicodemus ben Gurion, mentioned in the Talmud as a wealthy and popular holy man reputed to have had miraculous powers. Christian tradition asserts that Nicodemus was martyred sometime in the first century. Nicodemus is venerated as a Saint by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. Roman Catholics celebrate his memorial on August 3. The Franciscan Order erected a Church carrying his name and the name of St. Joseph of Arimathea in Ramla. The Orthodox Church celebrates him on the Sunday of the Myrrhbearers, a variable date falling always on the third Sunday of Pascha (Easter) and also on August 2, the date when sacred tradition states that his relics were found, along with those of the Apostle and Protomartyr Stephen and Gamaliel (another member of the Sanhedrin who, according to a Christian tradition, converted to Christianity, though many postmodernists now dispute this). The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... Nicodemus ben Gurion was a wealthy Jew who lived in Jerusalem in the first century C.E. He is widely believed to be identical to the Nicodemus mentioned in the Gospel of John. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Saints redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... Ramla (Hebrew רמלה Ramlāh; Arabic الرملة ar-Ramlah, colloquial Ramleh), is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... Eastern Orthodox icon of Mary Magdalene as a Myrrhbearer The term Myrrhbearers (Greek: Μυροφόραε, Myrophorae; Slavonic: Святых Жен Мироносиц) refers to the women who came to the tomb of Christ early in the morning and were the first witnesses of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Catholic Church bases all of its teachings on Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture (The Bible). ... Relics can be: Relics: the remains of saints (usually bones), honored in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. ... The Seventy Disciples or Seventy-two Disciples were early followers of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Luke . ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... St. ... Gamaliel the Elder, or Rabbi Gamaliel I, was the grandson of the great Jewish teacher Hillel the Elder. ...


Nicodemus was portrayed by Sir Laurence Olivier in the television series Jesus of Nazareth (miniseries) (1977) Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


References

  • Cornel Heinsdorff: Christus, Nikodemus und die Samaritanerin bei Juvencus. Mit einem Anhang zur lateinischen Evangelienvorlage (= Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte, Bd.67), Berlin/New York 2003

Gaius Vettius Aquilinus Juvencus was a Spanish Christian and Latin poet of the fourth century. ...

See also

Eastern Orthodox icon of Mary Magdalene as a Myrrhbearer The term Myrrhbearers (Greek: Μυροφόραε, Myrophorae; Slavonic: Святых Жен Мироносиц) refers to the women who came to the tomb of Christ early in the morning and were the first witnesses of the Resurrection of Jesus. ...

External links

Jesus meets with Nicodemus
Life of Jesus: Ministry Events
Preceded by
Temple Cleansing
  New Testament 
Events
Followed by
Samaritan Woman
at the Well
According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years. ... The narrative of Jesus and the Money Changers occurs in both the Synoptic Gospels and in the Gospel of John, although it occurs close to the end of the Synoptic Gospels (at Mark 11:15-19, 11:27-33, Matthew 21:12-17, 21:23-27 and Luke 19:45... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For the genre of Christian-themed music, see gospel music. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Icon of Christ in a Greek Orthodox church This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... Christian views of Jesus consist of the teachings and beliefs held by Christian groups about Jesus, including his divinity, humanity, and earthly life. ... This article is about Jesus the man, using historical methods to reconstruct a biography of his life and times. ... This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... In the New Testament, Cleophas is the single English rendering of two men, who are in the Greek originalsCleopas, an abbreviated form of Cleopatros, a commonplace Hellenistic name meaning son of a renowned father, and the other Clopas. Cleopas was one of the two disciples to whom the risen... Anna at the presentation of Jesus (right), from Giotto, Chapel of Scrovegni. ... Annas (also Ananus), son of Seth, was a Jewish High Priest from AD 6 to 15 and remained an influential leader afterwards. ... This article is about the biblical character Barabbas. ... Bartimaeus (more accurately Bar Timaeus, Son of Timaeus) is the name given in the Gospel of Mark to a blind man healed by Jesus as he exited Jericho (Mark 10:46-52). ... The Blind Man of Bethsaida is a story told only in Mark 8:22-26. ... Yhosef Bar Kayafa (Hebrew יְהוֹסֵף בַּר קַיָּפָא, ), also known as Caiaphas (Greek Καϊάφας) in the New Testament, was the Jewish high priest to whom Jesus was taken after his arrest in the garden of Gethsemane, and who played a part in Jesus trial before the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate. ... In the New Testament, Cleophas is the single English rendering of two men, who are in the Greek originalsCleopas, an abbreviated form of Cleopatros, a commonplace Hellenistic name meaning son of a renowned father, and the other Clopas. Cleopas was one of the two disciples to whom the risen... Statue of St Dismas (1750) in BÅ™eznice, Czech Republic. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ... Gestas, also spelled Gesmas is the apocryphal name (first appearing in the Gospel of Nicodemus) given to one of the two thieves who was crucified alongside Jesus. ... For other persons named Joachim, see Joachim (disambiguation). ... Joanna was one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazareth, often considered to be one of the disciples. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... Joses, in Hebrew, means He that forgives. Joses is one of the brothers of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Mark 6:3 and its parallel passage in Matthew 13:54 - 57. ... Lazarus is the name of two separate characters in the New Testament. ... Jesus healing the man from Gerasa. ... Longinus pierces the side of Christ. ... Luke the Evangelist (לוקא, Greek: Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... In the New Testament of the Bible, Malchus was the name of a servant of the high priest who helped try to arrest Jesus. ... Mark the Evangelist (מרקוס, Greek: Μάρκος) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark and a companion of Peter. ... For other uses, see Martha (disambiguation). ... This article is about the disciple of Jesus. ... Virgin Mary redirects here. ... Mary anoints Jesus in Bethany in this icon. ... Mary of Clopas (Greek: Maria he tou Klopa) was one of various Marys named in the New Testament. ... Jesus raises the young man at Nain from the dead because of his pity for the widow. ... For other uses, see Bartholomew (disambiguation). ... Nicodemus ben Gurion was a wealthy Jew who lived in Jerusalem in the first century C.E. He is widely believed to be identical to the Nicodemus mentioned in the Gospel of John. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Simeon the Righteous by Alexey Yegorov. ... According to the Gospel of Mark (15:21-22), Matthew (27:32), and Luke (23:26) Simon of Cyrene (שמעון Hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew Šimʿon, Tiberian Hebrew Šimʿôn) was compelled by the Romans to carry the cross of Jesus as Jesus was taken to his crucifixion: And as they came... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Susanna is the name of one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazarath. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... This article is about the supernatural being. ... In Christianity, the disciples were the students of Jesus during his ministry. ... The symbols of the four Evangelists are here depicted in the Book of Kells The Four Evangelists are the four followers of Jesus to whom are ascribed the writings forming the four Gospels of the New Testament: the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. ... Note that the subject Godfearers has no direct bearing upon Marc Edmund Jones and the Sabian Assembly, about which more is to be found in the context of an article at [1]. This pre-script to this article on Godfearers has been written because a google-search read-out for... The Herodians were a sect or party mentioned in Scripture as having on two occasions--once in Galilee, and again in Jerusalem--manifested an unfriendly disposition towards Jesus (Mark iii. ... Three Kings, or Three Wise Men redirects here. ... Eastern Orthodox icon of Mary Magdalene as a Myrrhbearer The term Myrrhbearers (Greek: Μυροφόραε, Myrophorae; Slavonic: Святых Жен Мироносиц) refers to the women who came to the tomb of Christ early in the morning and were the first witnesses of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... Proselyte, from the Greek proselytos, is used in the Septuagint for stranger (1 Chronicles 22:2), i. ... For the ethnic group of this name, see Samaritan. ... For the tractate in the Mishnah, see Sanhedrin (tractate). ... The Seventy Disciples or Seventy-two Disciples were early followers of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Luke . ... Sofer can refer to: A scribe Moses Sofer Jekuthiel Sofer Rube John Sofer This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Zealot redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For... Saint Andrew (Greek: Ανδρέας, Andreas), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle and the elder brother of Saint Peter. ... “Bartholomew” redirects here. ... James, son of Alphaeus was one of the Twelve Apostles. ... Saint James, son of Zebedee (d. ... John the Apostle (Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. ... Jesus and the Beloved Disciple, polychromed and gilded wood, c 1320 The phrase the disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John, but in none of the other accounts of Jesus. ... St John the Evangelist, imagined by Jacopo Pontormo, ca 1525 (Santa Felicita, Florence) John the Evangelist (d. ... Saint John on Patmos by Hans Baldung Grien, 1511 Saint John of Patmos, by Jean Fouquet John of Patmos is the name given to the author of the Book of Revelation (or Book of the Apocalypse) in the New Testament. ... Iscariot redirects here. ... For other uses, see Saint Jude (disambiguation). ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי, Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew: Mattay; Septuagint Greek: Ματθαίος, Matthaios), most often called Saint Matthew, is an important Christian figure, and one of Jesus Twelve Apostles. ... This article is about the New Testament figure. ... St Peter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Saint Philip. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The apostle... Judas the Zealot is a New Testament figure whose identity is not completely clear. ... Saint Thomas the Apostle, Judas Thomas or Didymus, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ... St Peter redirects here. ... St. ... Agabus - a prophet, probably one of the seventy disciples of Christ. ... This article is about Ananias and Sapphira. ... Ananias was one of the Seventy Apostles sent out by Jesus in Luke 10. ... Apollos (Απολλως; contracted from Apollonius) was an early Jewish Christian, who is mentioned several times in the New Testament. ... Priscilla and Aquila were a First Century Christian couple described in the New Testament. ... Aristarchus, a Macedonian of Thessalonica (Acts 27:2), was an early Christian mentioned in a few passages of the New Testament. ... Elymas the sorcerer is struck blind before Sergius Paulus. ... Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... Cornelius was a Roman Centurion who is considered by Christians to be the first Gentile to convert to the faith, as related in Acts of the Apostles, 10:1. ... The name Demetrius occurs in two places in the Bible, both in the New Testament: a Diana-worshipping silversmith who incited a riot against the Apostle Paul (Acts 19:24-41) a disciple commended in 3 John 1:12. ... Dionysius the Areopagite was the judge of the Areopagus who, as related in Acts, xvii, 34, was converted to Christianity by the preaching of Saint Paul. ... Dorcas is a female name of Greek origins, (in Aramaic - Tabitha), which means gazelle. ... Eutychus was a boy tended to by St. ... Gamaliel the Elder, or Rabbi Gamaliel I, was the grandson of the great Jewish teacher Hillel the Elder. ... Saint James the Just (יעקב Holder of the heel; supplanter; Standard Hebrew YaÊ¿aqov, Tiberian Hebrew Yaʿăqōḇ, Greek Iάκωβος), also called James Adelphotheos, James, 1st Bishop of Jerusalem, or James, the Brother of the Lord[1] and sometimes identified with James the Less, (died AD 62) was an important figure... Jason appears in the Bible in Acts 17. ... Joseph Barsabbas (also known as Justus) is a figure of early Christian history. ... Judas of Galilee or Judas of Gamala led a violent resistance to a census imposed for Roman tax purposes by Quirinius in Iudaea Province around 6 CE. The revolt was crushed brutally by the Romans. ... Lucius of Cyrene was, according to the book of acts, one of the founders of the Christian Church in Antioch of Syria. ... Luke the Evangelist (לוקא, Greek: Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... Lydia of Thyatira was the first recorded convert to Christianity in Europe. ... Mark the Evangelist (מרקוס, Greek: Μάρκος) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark and a companion of Peter. ... Mary (Hebrew מרים Miryām, Miryam Bitter) the mother of John, surnamed Mark, was one of the earliest of Jesuss disciples. ... St. ... Philip the Evangelist appears several times in the Acts of the Apostles but should not be confused with Philip the Apostle. ... Priscilla and Aquila were a First Century Christian couple described in the New Testament. ... ). Saint Publius is venerated as the first Bishop of Malta It was the same Publius who received the Apostle Paul during his shipwreck on the island as recounted in the Acts of the Apostles. ... This article is about Ananias and Sapphira. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The Seven Deacons were leaders elected by the early Christian church to minister to the people of Jerusalem. ... This article is about the first century figure from early Christianity. ... Silvanus was one of the Seventy Apostles, those followers of Jesus sent out by him in Luke 10. ... Simeon of Jerusalem, son of Cleophas was the leader of the church of Jerusalem, sometimes called the Jewish Christians, and according to most Christian traditions the second Bishop of Jerusalem. ... For the film, see Simon Magus (film). ... Sopater so-pa-ter, sop-a-ter (gr ΣωπατρoÏ‚; Sopatros, saviour of his father, Eastons reads The father who saves, Holmans reads “sound parentage”) Sopater was the son of Pyrhus, a man from the city of Berea, he accompanied Paul along with Aristarchus and Secundus the Thessalonians, Gaius... St. ... Theudas is also the name of a follower of Paul of Tarsus, who taught Valentinius, for more information, see Theudas (teacher of Valentinius) Theudas (Thoo duhs) Personal name meaning, gift of God. ... For other uses of Timothy, see Timothy (disambiguation). ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... In Christianity, Tychicus was a biblical disciple and companion of St. ... This is a tentative list of topics regarding political institutions of Ancient Rome. ... Aretas IV Philopatris was the King of the Nabataeans from roughly 9 BC to AD 40. ... Cornelius was a Roman Centurion who is considered by Christians to be the first Gentile to convert to the faith, as related in Acts of the Apostles, 10:1. ... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... Coin of Herod Archelaus Herod Archelaus (23 BC – c. ... Herod Philip II was the son of Herod the Great and his third wife Mariamne II. He became the second husband of Herodias after 6 and their child was Salome. ... Herod the Great. ... Longinus pierces the side of Christ. ... Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene, according to Luke 3:1, in the time of John the Baptist. ... Pilate redirects here. ... Pontius Pilates wife is unnamed in the New Testament (Matth. ... The Virgin and St Joseph register for the census before Governor Quirinius. ... Coin of Salome (daughter of Herodias), queen of Chalcis and Armenia Minor. ... For other persons named Tiberius, see Tiberius (disambiguation). ... Front and back of a Judean coin from the reign of Agrippa I. // Agrippa I also called the Great (10 BC - 44 AD), King of the Jews, was the grandson of Herod the Great, and son of Aristobulus IV and Berenice. ... Agrippa II (AD 27–100), son of Agrippa I, and like him originally named Marcus Julius Agrippa. ... Marcus Antonius Felix (Felix in Greek: ο Φηλιξ, born between 5/10-?) was the ancient Rome procurator of Iudaea Province 52-60, in succession to Ventidius Cumanus. ... Claudius Lysias is a figure mentioned in the New Testament book of the Acts of the Apostles. ... Porcius Festus was procurator of Judea from about 58 to 62 AD, succeeding Antonius Felix. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The word epistle is from the Greek word epistolos which means a written letter addressed to a recipient or recipients, perhaps part of exchanged correspondence. ... Achaichus was one of the members of the church of Corinth who, with Fortunatus and Stephanas, visited Paul while he was at Ephesus, for the purpose of consulting him on the affairs of the church (I Corinthians 16:17). ... Archippus (literally, master of the horse), a Christian evangelist, preaching at the time of the writings of Paul, in Colossae. ... For the 2nd century martyr of Tivoli, see St. ... Diotrephes was a man mentioned by John the Apostle in his letter to Gaius (3 John, verses 9–11). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... According to the Epistle to the Romans found in the New International Version of the New Testament, Erastus was Corinths director of public works[1], a position of high status. ... Jesus Justus or Iesous ho legomenos Ioustos (in Greek) is refereed to by the Apostle Paul of Tarsus in Colossians 4:11 Paul tells the Church at Colossae in his letter from Rome that Jesus who is called Justus sends his greetings. ... Junia (ιουνιαν) was an apostle of the 1st century, recorded by Paul in the Epistle to the Romans chapter 16 verse 7. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... Nymphas meaning nymph. ... Philemon was the recipient of a private letter from Paul of Tarsus. ... Phoebe (Christian woman) was mentioned by the Apostle Paul in Romans 16:1 as a deaconess of the early Christian church located in Cenchrea, an eastern port of Corinth. ... Syntyche - meaning fortunate; affable. ... For other uses, see Antipas. ... For other uses, see Four Horsemen. ... Apollyon (top) battling Christian in John Bunyans The Pilgrims Progress. ... In Christian eschatology, the Two Witnesses are two individuals, concepts or corporate beings described in chapter 11 of the Book of Revelation in the events leading up to the second coming of Christ. ... Peter Paul Rubens Woman of the Apocalypse The phrase Woman of the Apocalypse refers to a character from the Book of Revelation 12:1-10. ... Beast. ... The Three Angels messages are the three messages given by three angels in Revelation . ... A 1800s Russian engraving depicting the Whore of Babylon riding the seven-headed Beast. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years. ... According to the canonical Gospels, Jesus worked many miracles in the course of his ministry, which may be categorized into cures, exorcisms, dominion over nature, three instances of raising the dead, and various others. ... The parables of Jesus, found in the synoptic gospels, embody much of Jesus teaching. ... The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ... St. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... A folio from P46, an early 3rd century collection of Pauline epistles. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, gospels Matthew, Mark, and Luke are so similar that they are called the synoptic gospels (from Greek, συν, syn, together, and οψις, opsis, seeing). ... The word epistle is from the Greek word epistolos which means a written letter addressed to a recipient or recipients, perhaps part of exchanged correspondence. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... General epistles are books in the New Testament in the form of letters. ... The Apostolic Age is, to some church historians, the period in early church history during which some of Christs original apostles were still alive and helping to influence church doctrine, polity, and the like. ... // Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Early Christianity is the Christianity of the three centuries between the death of Jesus ( 30) and the First Council of Nicaea (325). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elim Sanctuary - Gays & Christianity - Nicodemus the Night Seeker (2088 words)
So, quietly Nicodemus came not knowing what to expect and calling Jesus, a "teacher from God" to learn of a new law, a new way of obedience so that God can be with him to do great works like Jesus and to have the assurance to be numbered in the kingdom of God.
Nicodemus was stunned, still carnal in mind, he asked how can one be re-birthed not realising that it is of spiritual birth that is not result of sex or the work in bed between a man and women.
Nicodemus knew then that one must be born again in the spirit, but how to do it since there are no works that can be done to achieve it.
Nicodemus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (239 words)
Nicodemus (Greek: Νικόδημος) was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, who, according to the Gospel of John, showed favour to Jesus.
Though there is no clear source of information about this Nicodemus outside the Gospel of John, the Jewish Encyclopedia and many Biblical historians have theorised that he is identical to Nicodemus ben Gurion, mentioned in the Talmud as a wealthy and popular holy man reputed to have had miraculous powers.
Nicodemus is venerated as a Saint by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m