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Encyclopedia > Nickel (United States coin)
Nickel (United States)
Value: 0.05 U.S. dollar
Mass: 5.000 g  (0.161 troy oz)
Diameter: 21.21 mm  (0.835 in)
Thickness: 1.95 mm  (0.077 in)
Edge: plain
Composition: 75% Cu
25% Ni

"Wartime Nickels"
From mid-1942 to 1945
56% Cu
35% Ag
9% Mn
Years of Minting: 1866–Present, excepting 1922, 1932, and 1933
Catalog Number: -
Obverse
Obverse
Design: Thomas Jefferson
Designer: Jamie Franki
Design Date: 2006
Reverse
Reverse
Design: Monticello
Designer: Felix Schlag
Design Date: 1938

The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. “USD” redirects here. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals, black powder, and gemstones. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... General Name, symbol, number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 54. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1978x1980, 2138 KB) Source United States Mint Date 2006-04-06 Author United States Mint Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Jefferson Nickel (United States... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1978x1980, 2073 KB) Source United States Mint Date 2006-04-06 Author United States Mint Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nickel (United States coin) Gallery... Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. ... Felix Oscar Schlag, (December 4, 1891 - March 9, 1974), was the designer of the current United States five cent coin. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... “USD” redirects here. ...


The nickel's design since 1938 has featured a profile of President Thomas Jefferson on the obverse. From 1938 to 2003, Monticello was featured on the reverse. For 2004 and 2005, nickels featured new designs to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition; these new designs were called the Westward Journey nickel series. In 2006, Monticello returned to the reverse, while a new image of Jefferson facing forward was featured on the obverse. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... “Lewis and Clark” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

General history

Prior to introduction of the nickel, five-cent pieces were very small silver coins called half dimes. Due to shortages of silver during and after the American Civil War, an alternative metal was needed for five-cent coinage, and the copper-nickel alloy still in use today was selected. Numerous problems plagued the coinage of nickels through the middle of the 20th century due to the extreme hardness of the alloy, but modern minting equipment has proven more than adequate for the task. This article is about the chemical element. ... The half dime was a silver coin, valued at five cents, formerly minted in the United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ...


Nickels have always had a value of one cent per gram (even when special nickel-free versions were issued temporarily during World War II). They were designed as 5 grams in the metric units when they were introduced in 1866, shortly before the Act of July 28, 1866 declared the metric system to be legal for use in the United States. BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Applying the term "nickel" to a coin actually precedes the usage of five-cent pieces made from nickel alloy. The term was originally applied to the Indian Head cent coin from 18591864 which was composed of copper-nickel. Throughout the Civil War these cents were referred to as "nickels" or "nicks". When the three-cent nickel came onto the scene in 1865, these were the new "nickels" to the common person on the street. In 1866, the Shield nickel hit the spotlight and forever changed the way Americans associated coins made from nickel alloy with a particular denomination. The Indian Head one-cent coin was produced by the United States Mint from 1859 to 1909. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Shield nickel, minted from 1866 to 1883, was Americas first nickel five-cent piece. ...


Local calls placed from public phone booths in the United States cost a nickel in most places until the early 1950s, when the charge was doubled to a dime (10 cents). However, in some places — notably in New Orleans, but mostly in scattered rural areas — the price for such calls remained at a nickel as late as the mid-1970s. This gave rise to the phrase "It's your nickel" in conversations to refer to the prerogative of the person who paid for the phone call to steer the conversation. cost of a ride on a public transit vehicle — such as a bus or subway — also stood at a nickel during the same period that a pay-phone call carried that charge, in many cities. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... A dime is a coin issued by the United States Mint with a denomination of one-tenth of a United States dollar, or ten cents. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... “Autobus” redirects here. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ...


Shield nickel (1866–1883)

Main article: Shield nickel

The shield nickel, designed by James B. Longacre, was the first nickel five-cent piece minted in the United States, in accordance with the Act of May 16, 1866. There is an early variety with rays passing from the numeral 5 through the spaces between the stars. These were minted only in 1866 and part of 1867. Longacre's original design had failed to take into account the difficulties of minting with such a hard alloy, and the rays caused a general lack of detail in areas on the opposite face of the coin. The Shield nickel, minted from 1866 to 1883, was Americas first nickel five-cent piece. ... James Barton Longacre, (August 11, 1794 - January 1, 1869) an American engraver, was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his death. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Shield nickels with and without rays
Shield nickels with and without rays

The metallurgical difficulties were the source of many minting errors in the Shield nickels. It is unusual to find a piece that does not have die cracks, and such examples trade for more in uncirculated condition, unlike many other coins where die cracks are considered an interesting variety with slight to moderate premium value. There are also many overdates, doubled dates and other punch errors.
Shield nickel Combined image from [1] and [2]. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Shield nickel Combined image from [1] and [2]. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Liberty Head V nickel (1883–1913)

Main article: Liberty Head nickel
V nickel with and without 'cents'
V nickel with and without 'cents'

Liberty Head (V) Nickels were officially minted from 1883 to 1912. However, an unknown mint official illegally produced an unknown quantity of V Nickels with the date 1913. There are currently only five known genuine examples of this 1913 coin (though many counterfeits exist), making them some of the most valuable coins in existence. At one point, all five known 1913 coins were owned by Colonel E.H.R Green, son of the famous Hetty Green. The "Olsen specimen", named for a previous owner, was auctioned in 2003 for $3 million. Legend Numismatics, a coin dealership in Lincroft, New Jersey, bought another from collector Ed Lee of Merrimack, New Hampshire on June 2, 2005 for $4.15 million, the second-highest price ever paid for a rare U.S. coin. These coins were made famous by B. Max Mehl, a coin dealer from Texas, who in the 1930s placed advertisements in newspapers throughout the United States offering $50 for one of these nickels. No one took him up on the offer, which was in reality an advertising ploy for his business (and its "Star Rare Coins Encyclopedia and Premium Catalogue"), but numismatists credit his search as contributing to increased interest in coin collecting. The original Liberty nickel design indicated the denomination only with a large Roman numeral V. The Liberty Head nickel, sometimes referred to as the V nickel due to its reverse design, was an American nickel five-cent piece. ... V Nickel Combined from [1] and [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... V Nickel Combined from [1] and [2] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Henrietta Hetty Howland Robinson Green (1834-1916) Henrietta Hetty Howland Robinson Green (November 21, 1834 – July 3, 1916) was an American businesswoman, remarkable for her frugality during the Gilded Age, as well as for being the first American woman to make a substantial impact on Wall Street. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Lincroft CDP in Monmouth County Lincroft is a part of Middletown Township, in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... Next to the Breezeway at Merrimack Town Hall Merrimack is a town located in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... “Advert” redirects here. ... Numismatics is the scientific study of currency and its history in all its varied forms. ... This article is about a hobby. ...


The original 1883 issue lacked the word "cents" on the reverse. Since the nickels were the same size as five-dollar gold pieces, some counterfeiters plated them with gold and attempted to pass them off as such. According to legend, a deaf-mute person named Josh Tatum was the chief perpetrator of this fraud, and he could not be convicted because he simply gave the coins in payment for purchases of less than five cents, but did not protest if he was given change appropriate to a five-dollar coin. There is no historical record of Tatum outside of numismatic folklore, however, so the story may well be apocryphal.[1] Deaf-mute was a term historically used by hearing people to identify a person who was deaf and could not speak. ...


Sometimes the 1883 nickel is referred to as the "Racketeer Nickel", and Josh Tatum is sometimes cited as the source of the saying, "You're not Joshin' me, are you?"


V nickels were minted only at Philadelphia until 1912, when Denver and San Francisco each minted a small quantity. All five 1913 examples were minted in Philadelphia. The D or S mint mark is located on the reverse, just below the left-hand dot near the seven-o'-clock position on the rim.


Buffalo nickel (1913–1938)

Main article: Indian Head nickel

The buffalo nickel (also known as the Indian head nickel) was produced from 1913 to 1938, inclusive. Mint marks for the coins are on the reverse, beneath the words "Five Cents" and above the rim. The Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco mints all participated in the mintage, though San Francisco generally had a much smaller annual production than either of the other two mints. The Indian Head (Buffalo) nickel was designed by James Earle Fraser. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Seal of the U.S. Mint The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ...

Buffalo nickel

The buffalo nickel, as designed by James Earle Fraser, featured a profile of a Native American on the obverse and an American Bison (buffalo) on the reverse. Fraser said he used Indian chiefs in the composite portrait. His memory was often faulty in this regard. The most likely models were Iron Tail, Two Moons and Adoeette. Adoeette was also known as Big Tree. There are several Indians who thought they were a model for the coin, including Two Guns White Calf and Isaac Johnny John John Big Tree. They are sometimes incorrectly named as having posed for Fraser. Neither did. The model for the bison may have been "Black Diamond," from New York City's Central Park Zoo. Fraser's design is generally considered to be among the best designs of any U.S. coin. Matte proof coins were specially struck for collectors from 1913 to 1917 at the Philadelphia mint. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (946x470, 207 KB)1935 Buffalo Nickel, photo taken by user Bobby131313 with an Olympus C-750 Ultra Zoom Bobby 04:04, 21 September 2006 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (946x470, 207 KB)1935 Buffalo Nickel, photo taken by user Bobby131313 with an Olympus C-750 Ultra Zoom Bobby 04:04, 21 September 2006 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... End of the Trail James Earle Fraser (November 4, 1876 – October 11, 1953) was an American sculptor, born in Winona, Minnesota. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Iron Tail Iron Tail (Sinte Maza) was an Oglala Sioux who fought alongside Sitting Bull at the Battle of Little Big Horn. ... Two Moons was a chief of the Cheyenne Native American tribe. ... Chief John Big Tree (2 June 1877 – 6 July 1967), was a Native American actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


There was a type change in mid-1913 when the mound on the reverse was changed mid-year to an incuse flat plane because of wear problems. Thus, with the three mints, there are six types of 1913 nickels. There was no change to the date placement, so the dates on many early buffalo nickels have been completely worn off. As the series progressed, the date was gradually struck with larger and bolder numerals, which ameliorated the problem.


Often, dateless buffalo nickels can have their dates "restored" by applying a ferric chloride solution to the date area. From a collecting standpoint this destroys the value of the coin, taking it from "very worn" to "very worn and chemically damaged". In addition to weak dates, many buffalo nickels — especially those minted in Denver or San Francisco in the 1920s — are found with the horn and/or tail on the reverse, or the word "LIBERTY" on the obverse, badly struck and lacking complete detail. The 1926-D is particularly noted for these defects. R-phrases , S-phrases , Related Compounds Other anions Iron(III) fluoride Iron(III) bromide Other cations Iron(II) chloride Manganese(II) chloride Cobalt(II) chloride Ruthenium(III) chloride Related coagulants Iron(II) sulfate Polyaluminium chloride Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25...


Four valuable varieties exist in the series. In 1918 some of the Denver mint nickels were minted from a redated 1917 die. The resulting 1918/7-D overdate is a rare and sought-after coin. This previously occurred with 1914 Philadelphia strikes, showing traces of a 3 under the last digit in the date. Also, in 1937 excessive polishing of a Denver mint die following a die clash removed most of the right foreleg, leading to the famous "three legged" variety. One estimate is that the number released may be only about 20,000, and specimens in higher grades are particularly valuable. Collectors should be cautious when purchasing this variety since counterfeits have been extensively produced. A 1936-D "3 1/2 leg" variety also exists. However, the most valuable is the 1916 doubled die. The most well preserved examples of this variety trade for between $250,000 and $500,000 when they appear at public auction.


Some 1.2 billion buffalo nickels were issued during the coin's 26-year lifespan, and only one date/mintmark combination (the 1926-S) had a mintage of less than 1 million. No buffalo nickels were made in 1922, 1932, or 1933. The lack of 1922 nickels, as well as some other denominations, resulted from the Mint's placing a priority on silver dollar production in that year, and no nickels — and many other denominations — were issued in 1932 or 1933 due to the Great Depression. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Because some people consider this design to be one of the best ever used on American coinage, the Mint has reused the design on the 2001 commemorative buffalo dollar and the 2006-Date American Buffalo gold bullion coin. The American Buffalo is a 24 karat gold bullion coin first released by the United States Mint in June 2006. ...


Profile of Jefferson nickel (1938–2004)

The Jefferson nickel, designed by Felix Schlag in a Mint-sponsored contest, was minted beginning in 1938. (In 1966 his initials were added to the base of the bust.) The obverse features a profile of Thomas Jefferson, while the reverse features his Virginian estate, Monticello. All three mints turned out vast quantities of Jefferson nickels until 1954, when San Francisco halted production for 14 years, resuming only from 1968 to 1970. Since 1970, all nickels for circulation have been minted at Philadelphia and Denver. Mint marks may be found on the reverse, in the right field between Monticello and the rim, on nickels from 1938 to 1964. From 1965 to 1967, no mint marks were used, and beginning in 1968, the mint mark was moved to the obverse, just below the date, where it remains today. In 1980, the Philadelphia mint began using a "P" mint mark on all nickels. This design is by far the most common currently in circulation. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1523x1500, 492 KB) Summary Obtained from the U.S. Mint. ... U.S. nickel reverse (public domain from usmint. ... Felix Oscar Schlag, (December 4, 1891 - March 9, 1974), was the designer of the current United States five cent coin. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Wartime nickels

From mid 1942 to 1945, so-called "Wartime" composition nickels were created. These coins are 56% copper, 35% silver and 9% manganese. The only other U.S. coins to use manganese are the Sacagawea and presidential dollars. These coins are usually a bit darker than regular nickels, said to be due to their manganese content (as was true of many British coins minted from 1920 through 1947). However, carefully-protected proof sets of these coins are difficult to tell from the standard alloy. A more likely reason for the darker appearance of the wartime coin was due to exposure to sulfur during circulation, which invariably gave the coins a mild and somewhat distinctive dark silver tarnish.[citation needed] General Name, symbol, number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 54. ... The Sacagawea dollar, along with the Presidential Dollar series, is one of the two current United States dollar coins. ... Reverse of Presidential dollar coin The Presidential $1 Coin Program is part of an Act of Congress, Pub. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 3, p Appearance lemon yellow Standard atomic weight 32. ...


The wartime nickel features the largest mint mark ever to grace a United States coin, located above Monticello's dome on the reverse. This mark was a large D or S if appropriate for those mints, but nickels of this series minted in Philadelphia have the unique distinction of being the only U.S. coins minted prior to 1979 to bear a P mint mark. When the price of silver rose in the 1960s the "war nickels" quickly disappeared from circulation, a process often aided by their distinctive silver-tarnish appearance, which sometimes appeared in banded form from contact of coins with sulfur-containing elastic bands in pockets. Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. ...


An unofficial variety of the wartime coin dated 1944 was made in 1954 when counterfeit nickels were produced by Francis LeRoy Henning of Erial, New Jersey. He had previously been arrested for counterfeiting $5 bills. The 1944 nickels were quickly spotted since Henning neglected to add the large mintmark. He also made counterfeit nickels dated 1939, 1946, 1947 and 1953. It is estimated that more than 100,000 of Henning's nickels reached circulation. These can still be found in pocket change, and there is a thriving collectors' market for them, although owning a counterfeit is technically illegal. Henning dumped another 200,000 nickels in Copper Creek, New Jersey, of which only 14,000 were recovered. Another 200,000 are thought to have been dumped in the Schuylkill River. When caught, Henning was sentenced to 3 years in jail, and was required to pay a $5,000 fine. For other uses, see Counterfeit (disambiguation). ... “NJ” redirects here. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... The Schuylkill River, pronounced SKOO-kull (IPA: ), is a river in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ...


As collectibles

Jefferson nickels are one of the easiest sets of any denomination to collect from circulation. One can still find coins from the 1940s in circulation on occasion. Many Jefferson nickel collectors look for fully struck steps on the image of Monticello. Premiums are paid for coins with five or six full steps. These are fairly rare, even on current issues. Proofs and special mint set coins (1965–1967), as well as matte proofs, exist, and have value above circulating coinage. Specialists look for the number of discernable steps on the facade of Monticello, and those without wear are known as "Full Step" Jefferson Nickels. One of the rarest, or "key dates" of the series is the 1950-D nickel. It has the lowest mintage of all the Jeffersons minted. However, they are not hard to find in higher grades, since it was known by the public from the beginning that the mintage was low, and thus they were hoarded. In uncirculated condition, the 1939-D, 1939-S, and 1942-D are far rarer than the 1950-D and command higher prices than any other coins in the series. // The hobby of collecting consists of acquiring specific items based on a particular interest of the collector. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... A beautiful example of a proof coin. ...


Westward Journey nickel series

Throughout the 20th century, Congress allowed the U.S. Mint to make changes to coinage every 25 years without specific authorization. Since the 1990s the government had begun to respond to lobbying in favor of changing coinage design. This led to the State Quarters series and in 2002, a proposal to change 2003 nickels as well. Initial proposals by the Mint had a new obverse based on a portrait by Gilbert Stuart, and a reverse with an American Indian and a bald eagle facing west. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Seal of the U.S. Mint The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Self portrait, 1778 Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America...


Congressman Eric Cantor (R-Virginia), the Chief Deputy Majority Whip for his party, objected to the lack of consultation with Congress about their proposal, and was particularly concerned that Monticello, located near his district, would not return to the reverse of the nickel in 2006. Some raised the issue that the Mint's proposed new reverse did not relate specifically enough to Lewis & Clark or the Louisiana Purchase, the events that the proposed changes were meant to commemorate. This led to the enactment of Public Law 108-15, the American 5-cent Coin Design Continuity Act, in 2003. This act, originally dubbed the Keep Monticello on the Nickel Act by Cantor, modified the United States Code to require the return to a depiction of Monticello starting in January 2006, and permanently eliminate the Mint's right to change it again without Congressional approval. The delay and controversy meant the Mint ran out of time to change the reverse of the nickel in 2003. Eric Ivan Cantor (born June 6, 1963) is an American politician who has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 2001, representing Virginias 7th congressional district (map). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Majority Whip is an elected member of the U.S. House of Representatives who assists the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader to coordinate ideas on and garner support for proposed legislation. ... Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. ... The American 5-cent Coin Design Continuity Act (Public law 108-15, 31 United States Code 5101) allowed coinage of the commemmorative Westward Journey Nickel Series and mandated that Monticello be depicted on the 2006 nickel, as it had been previously. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Upon passage of Cantor's new law, the Mint proposed the Westward Journey nickel series. The series consisted of two new reverse designs for 2004 and two for 2005.

Download high resolution version (1192x1192, 279 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

2004 designs

In 2004, the reverse of the nickel changed, with two different designs during the year. The first design, placed into circulation on March 1, 2004, featured a design based upon a rendition of the original Indian Peace Medal commissioned for Lewis and Clark's expedition. It was designed by Norman E. Nemeth. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Indian Peace Medals were a symbol of the relationships between the United States federal government and Native Americans in the late 1700s and 1800s, until the term of President Andrew Johnson ended. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ...


In the autumn of 2004, the reverse changed again to feature a view of Lewis and Clark's keelboat in full sail that transported members of the Corps of Discovery expedition and their supplies through the rivers of the Louisiana Territory. This design depicts Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in full uniform, standing in the bow of the keelboat. This nickel was designed by Al Maletsky.
This article is about the temperate season. ... A Keelboat is a keeled boat built for the navigation of rivers. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase. ... For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ...

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2005 designs

On September 16, 2004, the U.S. Mint unveiled its new designs for 2005. They had been chosen by John W. Snow on July 22, 2004 but were not disclosed to the public. The U.S. Mint revealed that the Felix Schlag depiction of Thomas Jefferson was being done away with in favor of a more modern depiction of Jefferson. The new obverse of the Jefferson nickel was designed by Joe Fitzgerald and engraved by Don Everhart II. Its circulation began on February 28, 2005. is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joe Fitzgerald one of the designers of the new, 2005 US nickel. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Also unveiled on September 16, 2004 were two new reverses. A depiction of the American bison temporarily returns to the reverse after a 67-year absence. The new reverse was designed by Jamie N. Franki and engraved by Norman E. Nemeth. The U.S. Mint had been lobbied to include the American bison on the nickel in the hope of keeping the public interested in its continuing recovery after nearly being hunted to extinction after the completion of the transcontinental railroad. is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ...


The final Westward Journey nickel reverse was designed by Joe Fitzgerald and engraved by Donna Weaver. It depicts the Pacific Ocean and the words from William Clark's diary upon reaching it. In a controversial move, the U.S. Mint decided to amend Clark's actual words. He had originally written, "Ocian in view! O! The Joy!" but as the spelling "ocian" is nonstandard (and might have led to hoarding in the mistaken belief that the Mint had made an error that would soon be corrected), the U.S. Mint decided to modify it to "ocean".
Joe Fitzgerald one of the designers of the new, 2005 US nickel. ... For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ...


Forward-Facing Jefferson (2006- )

In 2006, the nickel returned to using Felix Schlag's Monticello design on a newly cast reverse, while the obverse features a new forward-facing portrait of Jefferson, based on the 1800 Rembrandt Peale painting of Jefferson. It is the first U.S. circulating coin that features the image of a President facing forward. The new obverse was designed by Jamie Franki. The word Liberty is shown in Jefferson's own handwriting, as it was on the 2005 Westward Journey nickels.[2][3]
Felix Oscar Schlag, (December 4, 1891 - March 9, 1974), was the designer of the current United States five cent coin. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Self-Portrait - Rembrandt Peale Rembrandt Peale (22 February 1778 - 3 October 1860) was a United States Neoclassical painter. ...


Metal value

As of October 2007, the value of the metal in the coin has reached 6.8 cents, a 36% premium over its face value,[4] due to the rising costs of copper and nickel[5] against a falling U.S. Dollar. In an attempt to avoid losing large quantities of circulating nickels to melting, the United States Mint introduced new interim rules on December 14, 2006 criminalizing the melting and export of pennies and nickels. Violators of these rules can be punished with a fine of up to $10,000, five years imprisonment, or both.[6] For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nickels minted from 1942-1945 during World War II contain 0.05626 oz. silver. The silver content of these "war nickels" as of October, 2007 is worth $0.77.


Popular Culture

  • During the Depression, some states, particularly Washington, coined nickels made of wood. This brought about the line, "Don't take any wooden nickels!"
  • A songwriter named Lou Carter composed a novelty song titled "A Noseful of Nickels," which ends "I would sneeze all my nickels at-choo."
  • In an issue of Mad Magazine in the 1970s, this dialogue appeared:

Q. "What happened to the Indian on the nickel?"
A. "The same thing that happened to the Indian in America!"
This article deals with the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sneeze (disambiguation). ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ...


See also

A Canadian nickel is a coin worth five cents, patterned on the corresponding coin in the neighbouring United States, and introduced in Canada in 1922. ... Production values for each year are the sum of all facility outputs of business strike coins. ...

References

Books and articles

  • Q. David Bowers. U.S. 3-cent and 5-cent Pieces. Wolfeboro, NH: Bowers & Merena Galleries, 1985
  • Annette R. Cohen & Ray M. Druley. The Buffalo Nickel. Arlington VA: Potomac Enterprises, 1979
  • Thomas C. Day. "Joseph Wharton and Nickel Coinage". The Numismatist, October 1987
  • Bill Fivaz. "Reverse Carvings on Buffalo Nickels". Nickel News, Winter 1987
  • Kevin Flynn, et al. The Authoritative Reference on Buffalo Nickels. Zyrus Press, 2007
  • Alan Herbert. "1943/1942-P War Nickel". PAK Newsletter, March 1978
  • Kenneth R. Hill. "The 1872 Small Date Over Large Date". Nickel News, Summer 1988
  • Robert W. Julian. "The Lowly Nickel". Coin World, March-April 1987
  • Tom LaMarre. "B. Max Mehl: The 1913 Nickel Man". Rare Coin Review, Spring 1987
  • David W. Lange. Complete Guide to Buffalo Nickels. 2nd ed. Virginia Beach: DLRC Press, 2000
  • Bernard Nagengast. The Jefferson Nickel Analyst. Sidney, OH: Bernard Nagengast, 1979
  • Bernard Nagengast. "Rarity of Full Step Jefferson Nickels". Nickel News, Summer/Fall 1988
  • Gloria Peters and Cynthia Mohon. The Complete Guide to Shield and Liberty Head Nickels Virginia Beach: DLRC Press, 1995
  • Delma K. Romines. Hobo Nickels. Newberry Park, CA: Lonesome John Publishing Co., 1982
  • J.T. Stanton. "Doubling Your Fun with Jefferson Nickels." Nickel News, Fall 1987
  • Dwight H. Stuckey. The Counterfeit 1944 Jefferson Nickel. Charleston, SC: Dwight Stuckey, 1982
  • Robert R. Van Ryzin. "Which Indian Really Modeled?" Numismatic News, February 6, 1990
  • Michael Wescott with Kendall Keck. The United States Nickel Five-Cent Piece: History and Date-by-Date Analysis. Wolfeboro, NH: Bowers & Merena Galleries, 1991
  • Jim Wrzesinski. "Errors on the U.S. War Nickel". Errorscope, September 1987

Web-based information

  1. ^ http://www.coinbooks.org/club_nbs_esylum_v03n19.html
  2. ^ http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/nickel/index.cfm?action=returnToMonticello
  3. ^ http://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?action=press_release&ID=617
  4. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/money/2006-12-14-melting-ban-usat_x.htm
  5. ^ Prices of copper and nickel
  6. ^ December 14, 2006 press release by United States Mint concerning new rules outlawing the melting of pennies and nickels

External links

Preceded by
Half dime
Five Cent Coin of the United States
1866–Present
Succeeded by
Current

 
 

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