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Encyclopedia > Nicholas de Giers

Nikolay Karlovich Giers (1820-1895) was a Russian Foreign Minister during the reign of Alexander III. He was one of the architects of the Franco-Russian Alliance, which was later transformed into the Triple Entente. 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Painting of Tsar Alexander III (1886), by Ivan Kramskoi (1837-1887), original, 41 x 36 in. ... The Franco-Russian Alliance, originally a secret agreement, was signed in January 1894 between France and Russia. ... The Triple Entente was the alliance formed in 1907 between the United Kingdom, France and Russia after the signing of the Anglo-Russian Entente. ...


Giers, or Girs, was born on the 21st of May 1820. Like his predecessor, Prince Gorchakov, he was educated at the lyceum of Tsarskoye Selo, near St Petersburg, but his career was much less rapid, because he had no influential protectors, and was handicapped by being a Protestant of Teutonic origin. At the age of eighteen he entered the service of the Eastern department of the ministry of foreign affairs, and spent more than twenty years in subordinate posts, chiefly in south-eastern Europe, until he was promoted in 1863 to the post of minister plenipotentiary in Persia. Here he remained for six years, and, after serving as a minister in Switzerland and Sweden, he was appointed in 1875 director of the Eastern department and assistant minister for foreign affairs under Prince Gorchakov, whose niece he had married. 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Pushkins portrait of Alexander Gorchakov Alexander Mikhailovich Gorchakov (1798-1883) was a Russian statesman from the Gorchakov princely family. ... A lyceum is most often used today to denote either an educational institution (most often a school of secondary education in parts of Europe) or a public hall used for cultural events like concerts. ... Tsarskoye Selo (Царское Село in Russian, may be translated as “Tsar’s Village”), a former residence of the royal families and visiting nobility 24 km south of St. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Persia and Persian can refer to: the Western name for Iran. ... Pushkins portrait of Alexander Gorchakov Alexander Mikhailovich Gorchakov (1798-1883) was a Russian statesman from the Gorchakov princely family. ...


On the death of Alexander II in 1881 it was generally expected that M. de Giers would be dismissed as deficient in Russian nationalist feeling, for Alexander III was credited with strong anti-German Slavophile tendencies. In reality the young tsar had no intention of embarking on wild political adventures, and was fully determined not to let his hand be forced by men less cautious than himself. What he wanted was a minister of foreign affairs who would be at once vigilant and prudent, active and obedient, and who would relieve him from the trouble and worry of routine work while allowing him to control the main lines, and occasionally the details, of the national policy. M. de Giers was exactly what he wanted, and accordingly the tsar not only appointed him minister of foreign affairs on the retirement of Prince Gorchakov in 1882, but retained him to the end of his reign in 1894. Alexander II (1818-1881) Alexander (Aleksandr) II (Russian: Александр II Николаевич) (April 17, 1818–March 13, 1881) was the Emperor (tsar) of Russia from March 2, 1855 until his assassination. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Painting of Tsar Alexander III (1886), by Ivan Kramskoi (1837-1887), original, 41 x 36 in. ... Slavophile is a Westernized variant of the original Russian term Slavianophile. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In accordance with the desire of his august master, M. de Giers followed systematically a pacific policy. Accepting as a fait accompli the existence of the triple alliance, created by Bismarck for the purpose of resisting any aggressive action on the part of Russia and France, he sought to establish more friendly relations with the cabinets of Berlin, Vienna and Rome. To the advances of the French government he at first turned a deaf ear, but when the rapprochement between the two countries was effected with little or no co-operation on his part, he utilized it for restraining France and promoting Russian interests. He died on the 26th of January 1895, soon after the accession of Nicholas II. Alternate meanings: See Bismarck (disambiguation). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Nicholas II, Tsar of Russia Nicholas II of Russia ( 18 May 1868 – 17 July 1918 ) was the last crowned Emperor of Russia. ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911), contend supporters, in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...



 
Russian and Soviet Foreign Ministers
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Ivan Viskovatyi | Vasily and Andrey Shchelkalov | Ivan Gramotin | Pyotr Tretyakov | Almaz Ivanov | Afanasy Ordin-Naschokin | Artamon Matveyev | Vasily Golitsyn | Emelian Ukraintsev | Lev Naryshkin | Fyodor Golovin | Peter Shafirov | Gavrila Golovkin | Andrey Osterman | Alexey Bestuzhev-Ryumin | Mikhailo Vorontsov | Nikita Panin | Ivan Osterman | Alexander Bezborodko | Feodor Rostopchin | Petr Panin | Viktor Kochubey | Alexander Vorontsov | Adam Jerzy Czartoryski | Andrei Budberg | Nikolay Rumyantsev | John Capodistria | Karl Robert Nesselrode | Alexander Gorchakov | Nicholas de Giers | Alexis Lobanoff de Rostoff | Nikolay Shishkin | Mikhail Muravyov | Vladimir Lambsdorff | Alexander Izvolsky | Alexander Sazonov | Nikolay Pokrovsky | Pavel Milyukov | Mikhail Tereshchenko | Leon Trotsky | Georgy Chicherin | Maxim Litvinov | Vyacheslav Molotov | Andrey Vyshinsky | Dmitri Shepilov | Andrey Gromyko | Eduard Shevardnadze | Aleksandr Bessmertnykh | Boris Pankin | Andrey Kozyrev | Yevgeny Primakov | Igor Ivanov | Sergey Lavrov This page lists foreign ministers of Russian Empire, Soviet Union, and Russian Federation: // Heads of Posolsky Prikaz, 1549-1699 Ivan Viskovatyi 1549-70 Brothers Vasily and Andrey Shchelkalov 1570-1601 Ivan Gramotin 1605-06, 1610-12, 1618-26, 1634-35 Pyotr Tretyakov 1608-10, 1613-18 Almaz Ivanov 1635-67... Russian coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Ivan Mikhailovich Viskovatiy (Viskovatov) (Иван Михайлович Висковатый (Висковатов) in Russian) (? - 25. ... Vasily Yakovlevich Shchelkalov (Василий Яковлевич Щелкалов in Russian) (? – 1610 or 1611) and Andrey Yakovlevich Shchelkalov (Андрей Яковлевич Щелкалов) (? - c. ... Ivan Taraseivich Gramotin (? - 1638) was a Russian diplomat and head of the Posolsky Prikaz. ... Almaz (Yerofey) Ivanovich Ivanov (Алмаз (Ерофей) Иванович Иванов in Russian) (? — April 27 (May 7), 1669) was a Russian statesman. ... Afanasy Lavrentievich Ordin-Naschokin (1605 - 1680) was one of the greatest Russian statesmen of the 17th century. ... Artamon Sergeyevich Matveyev (Артамон Сергеевич Матвеев in Russian) (1625 - 1682) was a Russian statesman, diplomat and Ukraine and took part in some of Russias wars with Poland. ... Peter I permitted the Galitzines to take an emblem of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania as their coat of arms Galitzine, more correctly Golitsyn (Russian: Голицын), is one of the largest and noblest princely houses of Russia. ... Emelian (also spelled Yemelian) Ignatievich Ukraintsev (Емельян Игнатьевич Украинцев in Russian) (1641 - September 12(23), 1708) was a Russian diplomat and statesman. ... Count Feodor Alekseyevich Golovin (1650 - 1706) was the last Russian boyar and the first Russian chancellor. ... Baron Peter Pavlovich Shafirov (1670 - 1739), Russian statesman, one of the ablest coadjutors of Peter the Great, was of obscure, and in all probability of Jewish, extraction. ... Count Gavriil Ivanovich Golovkin (Гавриил Иванович Головкин in Russian) (1660-1734) was a Russian statesman. ... Andrey Ivanovich Ostermann (1686-1747) Count Andrei Ivanovich Osterman (June 9, 1686 _ May 31, 1747) was a German-born Russian statesman who came to prominence under Tsar Peter I of Russia (Peter the Great) and served until the accession of the Tsesarevna Elizabeth. ... Count Aleksei Petrovich Bestuzhev-Ryumin (Алексе́й Петро́вич Бесту́жев-Рю́мин) (1693 - 1768), Grand Chancellor of Russia, who was chiefly responsible for the Russian foreign policy during the reign of Empress Elizaveta Petrovna. ... Count Mikhail Illarionovich Vorontsov (Михаи́л Илларио́нович Воронцо́в) (1714 - 1767) was a Russian statesman and diplomat. ... Count Nikita Ivanovich Panin (Russian: ) (September 18, 1718–March 31, 1783) was an influential Russian statesman and political mentor to Catherine the Great for the first eighteen years of her reign. ... Prince Alexander Andreyevich Bezborodko (1747-1799) was the Grand Chancellor of Russia and chief architect of the Catherine the Greats foreign policy after the death of Nikita Panin. ... Count Fyodor Vasilievich Rostopchin (Фёдор Васильевич Ростопчин in Russian) (3. ... Count Viktor Pavlovich Kochubey Russian: (1768-1834) is Russian statesman and a close aide of Alexander I of Russia. ... Count Alexander Romanovich Vorontsov (1741-1805) was the Russian imperial chancellor during the early years of Alexander Is reign. ... Noble Family Czartoryski Coat of Arms Czartoryski Parents Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski Izabela Fleming Consorts Anna Zofia Sapieha Children with Anna Zofia Sapieha Witold Czartoryski Władysław Czartoryski Izabella Elżbieta Czartoryska Date of Birth January 14, 1770 Place of Birth Warsaw, Poland Date of Death July 15, 1861 Place of Death Montfermeil... The Rumyantsev family were the Russian counts prominent in the imperial politics of the 18th and early 19th century. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc. ... Count Karl Robert Nesselrode (December 14, 1780 - March 23, 1862) was a Russian diplomat and a leading European conservative statesman of the Holy Alliance. ... Pushkins portrait of Alexander Gorchakov Alexander Mikhailovich Gorchakov (1798-1883) was a Russian statesman from the Gorchakov princely family. ... Prince Aleksey Borisovich Lobanov-Rostovsky (December 30, 1824 - August 30, 1896) was a Russian statesman, probably best remembered for having published the Russian Genealogical Book (in 2 volumes). ... See also: Mikhail Muravyov Count Mikhail Nikolayevich Muraviev (Михаил Николаевич Муравьёв in Russian) (April 19, 1845 - June 21, 1900) was a Russian statesman who advocated transfer of Russian foreign policy from Europe to the Far East. ... Count Vladimir Nikolayevich Lambsdorff or Lamsdorf (1845 – 1907) was Russian foreign minister (1901 – 1906). ... Alexander Petrovich Izvolski (1856 – Russian diplomat. ... Sergey Dmitrievich Sazonov (1860 – 1927) was Russian foreign minister (1910 – 1916). ... Pavel Nikolayevich Milyukov (Cyrillic: Павел Николаевич Милюков) (1859-1943) was (alongside Vladimir Lenin and Peter Stolypin) the greatest Russian politician of pre-revolutionary years. ... 1915 passport photo of Trotsky Leon Davidovich Trotsky (Russian: Лев Давидович Троцкий; also transliterated Leo, Lev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij and Trotzky ) (October 26 (O.S.) = November 7 (N.S.), 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (Лев Давидович Бронштейн), was a Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist intellectual. ... Georgy Vasilyevich Chicherin (Russian: Георгий Чичерин) (1872–1936) was Peoples Commissar of Foreign Affairs in the Soviet government from 1918 to 1930. ... Maxim Litvinov Maxim Litvinov (Макси́м Макси́мович Литви́нов (Maksim Maksimovič Litvinov), real name Макс Ва́ллах (Max Wallach, or Meir Genoch Mojsiejewicz Wallach-Finkelstein)) (July 17, 1876–December 31, 1951) was a Russian revolutionary and prominent Soviet diplomat. ... Vyacheslav Molotov Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov (Russian: Вячесла́в Миха́йлович Мо́лотов) (February 25, 1890 (O.S.) (March 9, 1890 (N.S.))–November 8, 1986), Soviet politician and diplomat, was a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s, when he rose to power as a protege of Joseph Stalin, to the 1950s, when he... Andrey Yanuaryevich Vyshinsky (Андре́й Януа́рьевич Выши́нский) (December 10 [November 28, Old Style], 1883–November 22, 1954), also spelt Vishinsky, Vyshinski, was a Soviet jurist and later diplomat. ... Andrei Andreyevitch Gromyko (Андре́й Андре́евич Громы́ко) (July 5, 1909 – July 2, 1989) was foreign minister and chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union. ... Eduard Amvrosiyevich Shevardnadze (Georgian: ედუარდ შევარდნაძე, Russian: Эдуа́рд Амвро́сьевич Шевардна́дзе; pronounced ed-oo-ard am-vro-see-ye-vitch she-va-rd-nad-zuh) (born 25 January 1928) is a Georgian politician. ... Andrey Vladimirovich Kozyrev (born March 27, 1951) was the foreign minister of Russia under Boris Yeltsin from October 1990 until his dismissal in January 1996. ... Yevgeny Maksimovich Primakov (Евгений Примаков) (born October 29, 1929) is a former Chairman (predsedatel) of the government of the Russian Federation. ... Igor Sergeyevich Ivanov (Russian, Игорь Сергеевич Иванов) became Russias Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1998, succeeding Yevgeny Primakov. ... Sergey Viktorovich Lavrov, in Russian Сергей Викторович Лавров, is the minister of foreign affairs of the Russian Federation. ...



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:: Welcome to WARCHRON :: WarChron -1914 – The Russian Front - Tsar Nicholas II – Empress Alexandra (1477 words)
On 3 November 1894, upon the death of his father, Tsar Alexander III, Nicholas took the oath of allegiance at the age of 26 and was crowned as Emperor of Russia.
Nicholas' father had never encouraged his son to take an interest in state matters or to express his own opinions.
During June 1890, Nicholas met his wife to be, Princess Victoria Alix Helene Louise Beatrice of the German Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt, a Lutheran by birth, and grand-daughter of Queen Victoria.
Nicholas de Giers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (489 words)
Giers, or Girs, was born on the 21st of May 1820.
On the death of Alexander II in 1881 it was generally expected that M. de Giers would be dismissed as deficient in Russian nationalist feeling, for Alexander III was credited with strong anti-German Slavophile tendencies.
de Giers was exactly what he wanted, and accordingly the tsar not only appointed him minister of foreign affairs on the retirement of Prince Gorchakov in 1882, but retained him to the end of his reign in 1894.
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