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Encyclopedia > Nicholas Bacon
Sir Nicholas Bacon (Unknown artist, 1579)

Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509February 20, 1579) was an English politician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, notable as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and as the father of philosopher/statesman Sir Francis Bacon. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain, was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ...


He was born at Chislehurst, Kent, the second son of Robert Bacon (1479 - 1548) of Drinkstone, Suffolk. He graduated from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge in 1527 and, after a period in Paris, he entered Gray's Inn, being called to the bar in 1533. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, he profited by acquiring some of their property, including the Gorhambury estate, which belonged to St Albans Abbey and lay near the site of the vanished Roman city of Verulamium (modern day St Albans). From 1563 to 1568 he built a new house, Old Gorhambury House (now a ruin), which later became the home of Francis Bacon, his youngest son. Chislehurst is a place in the London Borough of Bromley. ... coat of Arms of Kent For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Entrance to Grays Inn Grays Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, England to which barristers belong and where they are called to the bar. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... Abbey gateway St Albans Abbey was an abbey at St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, dissolved in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35. ... Old Gorhambury House located near St Albans, Hertfordshire, England is an Elizabethan mansion, built in 1563-8 by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, and twice visited by Queen Elizabeth. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ...


In 1545 he became a Member of Parliament, representing Dartmouth. The following year, he was made Attorney of the Court of Wards and Liveries, a prestigious and lucrative post, and by 1552 he had risen to become treasurer of Gray's Inn. As a Protestant, he lost preferment under Queen Mary I of England. However, on the accession of her younger sister, Elizabeth in 1558 he was appointed Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, largely owing to the influence of his brother-in-law William Cecil. Shortly afterwards, Bacon was knighted. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The town seen from the River Dart Dartmouth is a town in Devon in the south-west of England. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (13 September 1521–4 August 1598), was an English politician, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign. ...


Bacon helped secure the position of Archbishop of Canterbury for his friend Matthew Parker, and in his official capacity presided over the House of Lords when Elizabeth opened her first parliament. Though an implacable enemy of Mary Queen of Scots, he opposed Cecil's policy of war against France, on financial grounds; but he favoured closer links with foreign Protestants, and was aware of the threat to England from the alliance between France and Scotland. In 1559 he was authorized to exercise the full jurisdiction of lord chancellor. In 1564 he fell temporarily into the royal disfavour and was dismissed from court, because Elizabeth suspected he was concerned in the publication of a pamphlet, A Declaration of the Succession of the Crowne Imperial of Ingland, by John Hales, which favoured the claim of Lady Catherine Grey (sister of Lady Jane Grey) to the English throne. Bacon's innocence having been admitted, he was restored to favour, and replied to a writing by Sir Anthony Browne, who had again asserted the rights of the house of Suffolk to which Lady Catherine belonged. He thoroughly distrusted Mary, Queen of Scots; objected to the proposal to marry her to Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk; and warned Elizabeth that serious consequences for England would follow her restoration. He seems to have disliked the proposed marriage between the English queen and François, Duke of Anjou, and his distrust of the Roman Catholics and the French was increased by the St Bartholomew's Day massacre. As a loyal English churchman he was ceaselessly interested in ecclesiastical matters, and made suggestions for the better observation of doctrine and discipline in the church. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Matthew Parker Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... Mary I (popularly known as Mary, Queen of Scots: French: ); (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from December 14, 1542, to July 24, 1567. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... John Hales (Hayles) (d. ... Lady Catherine Grey (sometimes spelled Katherine) (~1539 – January 1568), Countess of Hertford, was the second surviving daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk and Lady Frances Brandon. ... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 – February 12, 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days in July 1553. ... Sir Anthony Browne (d. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (March 10, 1536 — 1572) and 1st Earl of Southampton, was entrusted by Queen Elizabeth I of England with public office despite his family history and his prior support for the Catholic cause, although he claimed to be a... Hercule François, Duke of Anjou and Alençon, (March 18, 1555 – June 19, 1584) was the youngest son of Henry II of France and Catherine de Medici. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The St. ...


He died in London and was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral, his death calling forth many tributes to his memory. He had been an eloquent speaker, a learned lawyer, a generous friend; and his interest in education led him to make several gifts and bequests for educational purposes, including the foundation of a free grammar school at Redgrave. He was twice married and by his first wife, Jane Ferneley, had three sons and three daughters. Bacon's eldest son, Nicholas (c. 1540-1624), was member of parliament for the county of Suffolk and in 1611 was created premier baronet of England. This baronetcy is still held by his descendants, see Bacon Baronets. His second and third sons, Nathaniel (c. 1550-1622) and Edward (c. 1550-1618), also took some part in public life, and through his daughter, Anne, Nicholas was an ancestor of the marquesses Townshend. In 1553 he married his second wife Anne (1528-1610), daughter of Sir Anthony Cooke, by whom he had two sons, Anthony (1558-1601) and Francis (1561-1626). This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Old St. ... This article is about the Redgrave family of actors and actresses. ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown known as a baronetcy. ... Bacon of Redgrave (1611) This baronetcy was created for Nicholas Bacon, Member of Parliament for Beverley (1563-1567) and Suffolk (1572_1583) and the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, a prominent Elizabethan politician. ... Sir Anthony Cooke (c. ... Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, and essayist, but is best known as a philosophical advocate and defender of the scientific revolution. ...

  • Allegedly a descendant of his father Robert Bacon was the Virgina rebel Nathaniel Bacon {1640/6-1676}.

Nathaniel Bacon, engraving Nathaniel Bacon (1640/6 – October 26, 1676) was a colonist and plantation owner of the Virginia Colony of Jamestown, famous for his Virginia Rebellion, commonly known as Bacons Rebellion, which ended in the burning of Jamestown to the ground. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition article "Sir Nicholas Bacon", a publication now in the public domain.
Preceded by
Nicholas Heath
(Lord Chancellor)
Lord Keeper
1558–1579
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Bromley
(Lord Chancellor)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir Nicholas Bacon - LoveToKnow 1911 (667 words)
SIR NICHOLAS BACON (1509-1579), lord keeper of the great seal of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, was the second son of Robert Bacon of Drinkstone, Suffolk, and was born at Chislehurst.
In 1564 he fell temporarily into the royal disfavour and was dismissed from court, because Elizabeth suspected he was concerned in the publication of a pamphlet, " A Declaration of the Succession of the Crowne Imperiall of Ingland," written by John Hales, and favouring the claim of Lady Catherine Grey to the English throne.
Bacon's innocence having been admitted he was restored to favour, and replied to a writing by Sir Anthony Browne, who had again asserted the rights of the house of Suffolk to which Lady Catherine belonged.
Nicholas Bacon: Information from Answers.com (2004 words)
Bacon was born in 1561, the second son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, the lord keeper of the great seal, and Lady Ann, whose brother-in-law was Baron Burghley (William Cecil), the first minister to Queen Elizabeth I. Bacon, like his father, was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he enrolled at the age of twelve.
In 1584, at the age of twenty-three, Bacon was elected to the House of Commons, representing Taunton, Liverpool, the county of Middlesex, Southampton, Ipswich, and the University of Cambridge.
Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509–February 20, 1579) was an English politician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, notable as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and as the father of philosopher/statesman Sir Francis Bacon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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