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Encyclopedia > Nextel Cup
NEXTEL Cup
Category Stock car racing
Country or region Flag of the United States United States
Inaugural season 1949
Drivers 49
Teams 22
Engine suppliers 4
Last Drivers' champion Jimmie Johnson
Last Teams' champion Hendrick Motorsports
Last Makes' champion Chevrolet
Official website NASCAR.com

The NEXTEL Cup Series is NASCAR's top racing series. It was formerly known as the Strictly Stock Series (1949), Grand National Series (1950-1971), the Winston Cup Series (1972-2003), the NEXTEL Cup series (2004-2007), and will be the Sprint Cup Series from 2008 onward.[1] Image File history File links NASCAR_Nextel_Cup_Series_Logo. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other persons of the same name, see Jimmy Johnson. ... Hendrick Motorsports is a group of NASCAR racing teams started by Rick Hendrick in 1984 under the name All Star Racing, racing only Chevrolets, racing in both the Nextel Cup and Busch Series circuits. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Strictly Stock & Grand National

In 1949, NASCAR introduced the Strictly Stock division, after sanctioning only Modified division races in 1948. Eight races were run, on seven different dirt ovals and the Daytona Beach beach/street course.[2] The division was renamed to "Grand National" (not to be confused with the later Busch Grand National Series, now simply the Busch Series) for the 1950 season, reflecting NASCAR's intent to make its part of the sport more professional and more prestigious. It would retain this name until 1971. Daytona Beach Road Course was a race track that was instrumental in the formation of NASCAR. It originally became famous as the location where fifteen world land speed records were set. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations...


The 1949 Strictly Stock season is treated in NASCAR's record books as the first season of GN/Cup history.


Rather than a fixed schedule of one race per weekend with most entrants appearing at every event, the Grand National schedule included over sixty events in some years, often with two or three on the same weekend, and occasionally with two races on the same day in different states.


In the early years, most GN races were held on dirt-surfaced short ovals (from under a quarter-mile to over a half-mile lap length) or dirt fairgrounds ovals (usually a half-mile to a mile lap length). 198 of the first 221 Grand National races were on dirt tracks. In 1959, when Daytona International Speedway was opened, the schedule still had more races on dirt racetracks than paved ones. Through the 1960s, as superspeedways were built and old dirt tracks were paved, the number of dirt races was reduced.[3] Daytona International Speedway is a superspeedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ...


Winston Cup

NASCAR Winston Cup logo from 2000-2003
NASCAR Winston Cup logo from 2000-2003

From 1972 through 2003, NASCAR's premier series was called the Winston Cup Series. It was sponsored by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco. In its later years, RJR's sponsorship became more controversial in the wake of U.S. legislation that sharply restricted avenues for tobacco advertising. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Reynolds American Inc. ...


The changes in NASCAR that resulted from RJR's involvement cause many fans to refer to 1972 as the beginning of the "Modern Era". The season was made shorter, and the point system was modified several times in the next four years. Races on dirt tracks were removed from the schedule, as were oval races shorter than 250 miles. NASCAR's founder, Bill France, Sr., turned over control of NASCAR to his son, Bill France Jr.. In August 1974, Bob Latford designed a point system where equal points were awarded for all races regardless of length or prize money.[4] This system was used without changes from the 1975 season until the Chase for the Championship was instituted for the 2004 season. Dirt track racing is a type of auto racing performed on oval tracks. ... William Bill Henry Getty France, Sr. ... William Clay France, Jr. ...


Starting in 1981, an awards banquet has been held in New York City at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, initially in the Starlight Room. In 1985, the ceremony was moved to the Grand Ballroom, where it would be held until 2001. In 2001, the banquet portion was dropped in favor of a simpler awards ceremony. In 2002, the awards ceremony was moved to the Hammerstein Ballroom at the Manhattan Center. In 2003, the banquet format returned, as the ceremony moved back to the Waldorf-Astoria Grand Ballroom. This article is about the hotel. ... The Hammerstein Ballroom is a two-tiered, 12,000 square feet (3658m2) ballroom located within the Manhattan Center Studios on 311 West 34th Street in Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America. ... The Manhattan Center building, built in 1906 and located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, houses Manhattan Center Studios (home to two recording studios), its Grand Ballroom, and the Hammerstein Ballroom, one of New York Citys most renowned performance venues. ...


NEXTEL & Sprint Cup

NASCAR Sprint Cup 2008 logo
NASCAR Sprint Cup 2008 logo

In 2003, RJR dropped its sponsorship of the top series, and NASCAR obtained a sponsorship from NEXTEL, a telecommunications company. In 2004, the series became known as the NEXTEL Cup Series. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The 2005 merger between Sprint and NEXTEL will result in the cup series being renamed the Sprint Cup, beginning with the 2008 season. [5]


The NEXTEL Cup trophy is designed by Tiffany & Co., and is silver with a pair of checkered flags in flight. The NEXTEL Cup is a trophy that is awarded to the winner of the NASCAR stock car racing series of the same name. ... Tiffany Blue seen here on a Tiffany gift box. ...


Chase for the Championship

When NEXTEL took over NASCAR's premier sponsorship for the 2004 season, they used the USAR Hooters Pro Cup Series as a model to develop major changes in scoring. First, five additional points were added for a race win. Second, a new formula for declaring a series champion based on the ProCup system was devised. A cut was made after 26 races, with the high twelve drivers and teams plus ties placed in the Chase for the Championship (or simply "The Chase"). (Originally, the top ten teams plus any team within 400 points of the leader qualified; NASCAR changed this beginning with the 2007 season.) The Chase participants have their points increased to a level mathematically unattainable by anyone outside this field (roughly 1800 points ahead of the first driver outside of the Chase). From 2004 to 2006, the leader's total was set at 5,050 points, with other positions dropping by ten points per position, with a limit of 5,000 points after ties and the 400 point cut. Starting in 2007, each driver who makes the Chase will receive 5,000 points, plus 10 additional points for each race he won during the first 26 races. Race layouts remain the same and points are scored the same way in the final 10 races. Whoever leads in points after the 36th race is declared the NEXTEL Cup champion. The NEXTEL Cup trophy presented to the champion after the Ford 400. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The USAR Hooter Pro Cup is a stock car auto racing series in the United States. ... The 2007 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup season began on February 10 at Daytona International Speedway with the Budweiser Shootout and will end with the Ford 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. ...

To encourage continued competition among all drivers, a number of awards are given to drivers finishing outside the Chase. The highest finishing non-Chase driver (in 2007, 13th place at the end of the season) is awarded a bonus (approximately $1 million) and a position on stage at the postseason awards banquet. Awards are also given to the top 20 and 25 drivers and teams. Finally, finishing in the top 35 is important, as those 35 teams are guaranteed entry into the first 5 races of the next season without needing to qualify on speed. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The NEXTEL Cup is a trophy that is awarded to the winner of the NASCAR stock car racing series of the same name. ...


This playoff system was implemented primarily to make the points race more competitive late in the season, and indirectly, to increase television ratings during the NFL season, which starts around the same time as the Chase begins. Furthermore, the Chase also forces teams to perform at their best during all three stages of the season -- the first half of the regular season, the second half of the regular season, and the Chase. NFL redirects here. ...


Previously, the Cup champion may have been decided before the last race (or even several races before the end of the season) because it was mathematically impossible for any other driver to gain enough points to overtake the leader.


From 2004-2006 the Chase was shown on NBC Sports and TNT. In 2007, ABC will broadcast all 10 races of the Chase as part of the new NASCAR television contracts that came in effect. The NBC Sports logo used since 1989. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ...


NEXTEL Cup Owner's Championship

1992 Owner's championship trophy
1992 Owner's championship trophy

The NEXTEL Cup Owner's Championship operates in the same manner as the Driver's Championship, but with one addition. In the event of more than 43 cars attempting to qualify for a race, owner's points are awarded to each car in the following manner: the fastest non-qualifier (in essence, 44th position) receives 31 points, three less than the 43rd position car. If there is more than one non-qualifying car, owners' points continue to be assigned in the manner described, decreasing by three for each position. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 454 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,256 × 1,657 pixels, file size: 550 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Royalbroil and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 454 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,256 × 1,657 pixels, file size: 550 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Royalbroil and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ...


There is a separate "chase for the championship" for the owners' points.


A 2005 rule change in NASCAR's three national series affects how the owner's points are used. The top 35 (Nextel Cup), or top 30 (other series) full-time teams in owner points are awarded exemptions for the next race, guaranteeing them a position in the next race. These points can decide who is in and out the next race, and have become crucial since the exemption rule was changed to its current format. At the end of each season, the top 35 in owner's points are also locked into the first five races of the next season.


In some circumstances, a team's owners' points will differ from the corresponding driver's points. In 2005, after owner Jack Roush fired Kurt Busch during the next-to-last race weekend of the season, the #97 team finished in eighth place in owner's points, while Busch ended up tenth in driver's points. In 2002, when Sterling Marlin was injured, the #40 team finished eighth in owner's points, while Marlin was 18th in driver's points, because of substitute drivers Jamie McMurray and Mike Bliss, who kept earning owner points for the #40. Jack Roush (born April 19, 1942) is the founder, CEO, and co-owner along with John Henry of Roush Fenway Racing, a NASCAR team headquartered in Concord, North Carolina, and is Chairman of the Board of Roush Enterprises. ... Kurt Thomas Busch (born August 4, 1978 in Las Vegas, Nevada) is a NASCAR driver. ... Sterling Marlin (born June 30, 1957 in Columbia, Tennessee) is a NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series driver who drove the #14 Waste Management Chevrolet Monte Carlo for Ginn Racing until being replaced by Regan Smith July 17, 2007. ... James Christopher Jamie McMurray (born June 3, 1976 in Joplin, Missouri) is a NASCAR driver. ... Mike Bliss (born April 5, 1965, in Milwaukie, Oregon) is a NASCAR driver. ...


Manufacturer's Championship

NASCAR does have a Manufacturer's Championship in their national series, although the Driver's Championship is considered more prestigious. In the past, manufacturer's championships were very prestigious because of the number of manufacturers involved, and the manufacturer's championship was a major marketing tool. In the Busch Series, the championship is known as the Bill France Performance Cup.


Points are scored in a 1960-1990 Formula One system, with the winner's manufacturer scoring nine points, six for the next manufacturer, four for the manufacturer third among makes, three for the fourth, two for the fifth, and one point for the sixth positioned manufacturer. This means that if Chevrolets place first through tenth in a given race and a Ford is 11th and a Dodge 12th, Chevrolet earns 9 points, Ford 6 and Dodge 4.


The Cars

Evolution of NEXTEL Cup Cars

1949-1980

When the series was formed under the name, strictly stock, the cars were just that, production vehicles with no modifications allowed. The term stock car implied that the vehicles racing were unmodified street cars. Drivers would race with factory installed bench seats and AM radios still in the cars. To prevent broken glass from getting on the race track, windows would be rolled down, external lights would be removed, and wing mirrors would be removed. Before the early 1960s, cars were based on full sized cars such as the Chevrolet Impala or Ford Galaxie. As mid-size cars were introduced such as the Fairlane, they were adopted after the mid 1960s. This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... The traditional seat installed in American automobiles was the bench seat. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... The lighting system of a motor vehicle consists of lighting and signalling devices mounted or integrated to the front, sides and rear of the vehicle. ... Wing mirror of a Volkswagen Fox. ... 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible The Chevrolet Impala is an automobile built for the Chevrolet division by General Motors. ... 1966 Ford Galaxie 7 Litre Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ford Galaxie For other uses, see Galaxie (disambiguation). ... A mid-size car, frequently referred to as an intermediate, is an automobile with a size between that of a compact and a full-size or standard-size car. ... Ford Motor Company has used the Fairlane name on a number of automobiles since 1955. ...

NASCAR once mandated that a homologation rule that at various times stated as few as 500 cars had to be produced, or as many as one car for every make's dealership in the nation had to be sold to the general public. Sometimes cars were made expressly for NASCAR, such as the Ford Torino Talladega, which had a rounded nose. The most famous aero-warrior was the Dodge Charger Daytona and later Plymouth Superbird which had a rear spoiler raised above roof level and a shark shaped nose-cap which enabled speeds of over 220 mph, quickly outpacing most other cars. NASCAR soon rewrote the rules to effectively outlaw such outlandish aerodynamic trickery. Perhaps the least aerodynamic was the Penske-prepared factory backed 1972 AMC Matador piloted by Mark Donahue, dubbed the "flying brick". Image File history File links RichardPettyRoadrunner. ... Homologation is a technical term, derived from the Greek homologos (ομόλογος) for agree, which is generally used in English to signify the granting of approval by an official authority. ... The Ford Torino Talladega was a car produced by the Ford Motor Company during 1969 only. ... Dodge, an American automobile brand, has produced three separate vehicles with the name Dodge Charger Daytona, all of which were modified Dodge Chargers. ... The short-lived Plymouth Road Runner Superbird, a sister design to the Dodge Charger Daytona, was designed to beat the Ford Torino Talladega at NASCAR stock car racing and to lure Richard Petty back to Plymouth. ... 1974 Matador rebuilt as a replica of a Police Car from The Dukes of Hazzard Second generation 1975 Matador base model sedan The AMC Matador was an intermediate car built and sold by the American Motors Corporation (AMC) from 1971 to 1978. ... Mark Donahue, born March 18, 1937 - died August 19, 1975, was an American race car driver. ...


1981-2007

Bill Elliott's Melling Racing car that set the record for the fastest lap in a stock car - 212.809 mph, 44.998 sec at Talladega Superspeedway
Bill Elliott's Melling Racing car that set the record for the fastest lap in a stock car - 212.809 mph, 44.998 sec at Talladega Superspeedway

In 1981, cars downsized into Fairmonts and Thunderbirds along with the now smaller Monte Carlos. The Monte Carlo adopted bubble back windows, while the Buick Regal would do well both on the track and as a street muscle car. The aero-Thunderbirds, driven by drivers like Mark Martin, did well. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (898x334, 167 KB) Summary I took this pic myself. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (898x334, 167 KB) Summary I took this pic myself. ... Bill Elliott car that set the record for the fastest recorded time in a stock car - 212. ... Melling Racing was a NASCAR team from 1982 to 2002. ... Talladega Superspeedway is a motorsports complex located in Talladega, Alabama. ... 2006 car Mark Anthony Martin (born January 9, 1959 in Batesville, Arkansas) is a NASCAR Nextel Cup Series driver for Dale Earnhardt, Inc. ...


By the 1990s, GM had switched to V6-engined front-wheel-drive Luminas and Grand Prix, but the NASCAR racers only kept the body shape, with V8 rear-wheel-drive running gear. When the Ford Thunderbird was retired, without Ford having any two-door intermediate bodies, the four-door Ford Taurus was used for a body even though NASCAR racers actually have no opening doors. The Ford Thunderbird was a car manufactured in the United States by the Ford Motor Company. ... The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ...


While the manufacturers and models of automobiles used in racing were named for production cars (Dodge Charger, Chevrolet Monte Carlo, Toyota Camry, and the Ford Fusion), the similarities between NEXTEL Cup cars and actual production cars were limited to a small amount of shaping and painting of the nose, headlight and tail light decals, and grill areas. Until 2003, the hood, roof, and decklid were identical to their stock counterparts. There have been many different Dodge vehicles, on three different platforms, bearing the Charger nameplate. ... The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American mid-size car. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... The American Ford Fusion (code name CD338) is a mid-size car based on the Ford CD3 platform. ... Look up Decal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Because of the notorious manner of the Ford Taurus race car and how the manufacturer turned the car into an "offset" car (the car was notoriously asymmetrical in race trim because of its oval shape), NASCAR ended this practise to put more emphasis on parity and based new body rules in 2003, similar to short track racing, where offset cars had become a burden for race officials, resulting in the "Approved Body Configuration" design. The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ...


Car of Tomorrow (2007-present)

Main article: Car of Tomorrow

The "Car of Tomorrow" (COT) began racing during the 2007 season, with its debut at Bristol Motor Speedway in March. This car has focused mainly on safety, with the driver's seat being moved closer to the center of the car. The car's width has been increased by 4 inches, the front bumper has been re-designed to virtually eliminate bump-drafting, and the height of the car has increased by 2 inches to accommodate taller drivers and increase aerodynamic drag. New rules for the car eliminate the asymmetrical bodies on cars which had run rampant since the 1998 Taurus release. The most noticeable change to fans will be the addition of a rear wing (all of which are owned by NASCAR, not the teams) replacing the familair spoiler. NASCAR will distribute the new wings like they do restrictor plates [6]. This article is about the NASCAR car style. ... Grandstand in 2007 Scoring pilon in August 2007 Sign proclaiming the track the Worlds Fastest Half-Mile in 2007 Bristol Motor Speedway, originally known as Bristol International Raceway and Bristol Raceway is a NASCAR short track located in Bristol, Tennessee. ... This article is about the racing technique. ... An object moving through a gas or liquid experiences a force in direction opposite to its motion. ... Artist rendering of a NASCAR restrictor plate A Restrictor plate or air restrictor is a device installed at the intake of an engine to limit its power. ...


The COT was used in 2007 events at all oval tracks shorter than 1.5 miles, at all road courses, and at the October race at Talladega Super Speedway. While initially Nascar planned to wait until the start of the 2009 season to use the COT in every race, they have since changed that date to the start of the 2008 season. Many drivers still have complaints about the COT, but this new timeline should help teams save money by giving them only one car specification to work on. [7] Road racing can be a term involving road running, road bicycle races, or automobile races. ... Talladega Superspeedway is a motorsports complex located in Talladega, AL. It was constructed in the 1960s in place of abandoned airport runways by International Speedway Corporation, a business controlled by NASCARs founding France family along with Daytona International Speedway and several other racetracks. ...


Design and setup

The cars are front engine rear-wheel-drive, high-powered, vehicles with a roll cage serving as a space frame chassis and thin sheet metal covering. They are powered by carbureted V8 engines, with cast iron blocks, and a pushrod valvetrain actuating two-valves per cylinder, and limited to 358 cubic inches (about 5.8 liters) displacement. However, modern technology has allowed power outputs over 800 horsepower in unrestricted form while retaining the conventional basic engine design. In fact, before NASCAR instututed the gear rule, NEXTEL Cup engines were capable of operating in excess of 9,800rpm. In Automobile design, an FF, or Front-engine, Front wheel drive, layout places both the engine and drive wheels at the front of the vehicle. ... Rear wheel drive was a common form of engine/transmission layout used in automobiles throughout the 20th century. ... A specially constructed frame built around the cab of a vehicle to protect the driver from being injured in an accident, particularly in the event of a roll-over. ... Simplified space frame roof with the half-octahedron highlighted in blue A space frame is a truss-like, lightweight rigid structure constructed from interlocking struts in a geometric pattern. ... Look up Chassis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sheets of stainless steel cover the Chrysler Building Thin sheets of gold leaf Sheet metal is simply metal formed into thin and flat pieces. ... One complete cycle of a four cylinder, four stroke engine. ... NASCAR makes and enforces numerous rules and regulations that transcend all racing series. ...


The front suspension is a double wishbone design, while the rear supsension is a two-link live axle design utilizing trailing arms. Brake rotors must be made of magnetic cast iron or steel and may not exceed 12.72 inches (32.3 centimeters) in diameter.[8] The only aerodynamic components on the vehicles are the front splitter, rear wing (with endplates), NACA ducts in the windows only, and side skirts. The use of rear diffusers, vortex generators, canards, wheel well vents, hood vents, and undertrays is strictly prohibited. While the cars may reach speeds of about 200mph (321.8km/h) on certain tracks, Russ Wicks drove a stock car built to NASCAR's specifications 244.9mph (394.1km/h) during a speed record attempt at the Bonneville Salt Flats in October 2007.[9] The front suspension components of a Ford Model T. Suspension is the term given to the system of springs, shock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels. ... A double wishbone suspension is an automobile independent suspension design using two parallel wishbone-shaped arms to locate the wheel. ... A multi-link suspension is a type of vehicle suspension design typically used in independent suspensions, using three or more lateral arms, and one or more longitudinal arms. ... A live axle is a type of beam axle suspension system that uses the driveshafts that transmit power to the wheels to connect the wheels laterally so that they move together as a unit. ... A trailing-arm suspension is an automobile suspension design in which one or more arms (or links) are connected between (and perpendicular to) the axle and the chassis. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Vehicle brake. ... A diffuser, in an automotive context, is usually a shaped section of the car underbody which improves the cars aerodynamic properties by enhancing the transition between the high-velocity airflow underneath the car and the much slower freestream airflow of the ambient atmosphere. ... For other uses, see Wing (disambiguation). ... Artists concept picture of a submerged inlet for a jet airplane The NACA duct or NACA scoop is a common form of low-drag intake design, orginally developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1945. ... A diffuser, in an automotive context, is usually a shaped section of the car underbody which improves the cars aerodynamic properties by enhancing the transition between the high-velocity airflow underneath the car and the much slower freestream airflow of the ambient atmosphere. ... 1967 Model Cessna 182K in flight showing after-market vortex generators on the wing leading edge After-market Micro Dynamics vortex generators mounted on the wing of a Cessna 182K The Symphony SA-160 has two unique vortex generators on its wing to ensure aileron effectiveness through the stall A... Look up canard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bonneville Salt Flats The Bonneville Salt Flats are a 121 km² (47 mi²) salt flat in northwestern Utah. ...


The automobiles' suspension, brakes, and aerodynamic components are also selected to tailor the cars to different racetracks. A car that understeers is said to be "tight", or "pushing," causing the car to keep going up the track with the wheel turned all the way left, while one that oversteers is said to be "loose," or "free," causing the back end of the car to slide around which can result in the car spinning out if the driver is not careful. The adjustment of front and rear aerodynamic downforce, spring rates, track bar geometry, brake proportioning, the wedge (also known as cross-weight), changing the camber angle, and changing the air pressure in the tires can change the distribution of forces among the tires during cornering to correct for handling problems. Recently, coil bind setups have become popular among teams. Ideally, when the car reaches the turn, the driver will steer it along the line marked with green dots. ... Ideally, when the car reaches the turn, the driver will steer it along the line marked with green dots. ... Three different styles of front wings from three different Formula 1 eras, all designed to produce downforce on the front wheels. ... The rate of a spring is the change in the force it exerts, divided by the change in deflection of the spring. ... A track bar is a part of a live axle suspension also known as a Panhard rod. ... A wheel with a negative camber angle Camber angle is the angle made by the wheel of an automobile; specifically, it is the angle between the vertical axis of the wheel and the vertical axis of the vehicle when viewed from the front or rear. ... Coil bind is a style of setup used in various levels of NASCAR racing. ...


These characteristics are also affected by tire stagger (tires of different circumference at different positions on the car, the right rear having the most influence in left turns) as well as the rubber compounds used in tire construction. These settings are determined by NASCAR and Goodyear engineers and may not be adjusted by individual teams. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ...


NASCAR will mandate changes during the season if one particular car model becomes overly dominant. However, almost all advantages of using one car over another have been nullified. NASCAR used to mandate stock or stock replacement hoods, roofs, and decklids. However, in recent years, NASCAR has begun to require cars to conform to common body templates, regardless of make/model. This is more in-line with recent NASCAR tradition, because none of these stock cars have anything mechanically "stock" about them. NASCAR officials are using a template to inspect Casey Atwoods 2004 Busch Series car, courtesy of the U.S. Navy A template is a device used by NASCAR and other sanctioning bodies to check the body shape and height of cars. ...


Specifications

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 286 KB) Photographer: Brian Cantoni Description: Engine compartment, Ricky Rudd #21 Taken on: 2004-11-06 11:28:54 Original source: Flickr. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Cam-in-block. ... The Liberty V8 aircraft engine clearly shows the configuration, although modern automotive versions use a 90 degree block angle. ... A manual transmission (also known as a stick shift, straight drive, or standard transmission) is a type of transmission used in automotive applications. ... Officially the pound is the name for at least three different units of mass: The pound (avoirdupois). ... Kg redirects here. ... This article is about a unit of measurement. ... For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ... Artist rendering of a NASCAR restrictor plate A Restrictor plate or air restrictor is a device installed at the intake of an engine to limit its power. ... For other uses, see Octane (disambiguation). ... Petrol redirects here. ... Bendix-Technico (Stromberg) 1-barrel downdraft carburetor model BXUV-3, with nomenclature A carburetor (North American spelling) / carburettor (international spelling), colloquially called a carb (in North America and the United Kingdom) or carby (chiefly in Australia), is a device that blends air and fuel for an internal combustion engine. ... A naturally-aspirated engine or normally-aspirated engine (NA - aspiration meaning breathing) refers to an internal combustion engine (normally petrol or diesel powered) that is neither turbocharged nor supercharged. ... Power steering is a system for reducing the steering effort on cars by using an external power source to assist in turning the wheels. ... Recirculating Ball is an alternate steering mechanism, commonly found in older vehicles. ...

NEXTEL Cup tracks

NASCAR races are not conducted on identical tracks. Oval tracks vary in length from 0.526 miles (847 m) (Martinsville Speedway) to 2.66 miles (4.28 km) (Talladega Superspeedway). While some tracks are ovals (Bristol Motor Speedway, Dover International Speedway), many are tri-ovals (Kansas Speedway, Daytona International Speedway). Other configurations are quad-oval (Lowe's Motor Speedway, Atlanta Motor Speedway, Texas Motor Speedway), D-oval(California Speedway, Michigan International Speedway, Richmond International Raceway), oval with unequal ends (Darlington Raceway), triangular (Pocono Raceway), and almost-rectangular (Indianapolis Motor Speedway). Courses also differ in degree of banking on the curves, with differences in degree of banking and course length contributing to different top speeds on various courses. New Hampshire International Speedway and Phoenix International Raceway are considered "flat" tracks as they have only 7 and 11 (respectively) degrees of banking in the turns. Two courses (Infineon Raceway and Watkins Glen International) are complex shaped road courses and the only two tracks where NASCAR has developed rain tires. These tires have never been used in a competition setting, although they have been used during practices at Watkins Glen and during a qualifying session at Suzuka, Japan for an exhibition race. Martinsville Speedway is an International Speedway Corporation owned NASCAR stock car racing track located in Martinsville, Virginia. ... Talladega Superspeedway is a motorsports complex located in Talladega, Alabama. ... Grandstand in 2007 Scoring pilon in August 2007 Sign proclaiming the track the Worlds Fastest Half-Mile in 2007 Bristol Motor Speedway, originally known as Bristol International Raceway and Bristol Raceway is a NASCAR short track located in Bristol, Tennessee. ... Dover International Speedway (nickname: The Monster Mile) is a NASCAR race track located near Dover, Delaware. ... Kansas Speedway is a speedway in Kansas City, in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Daytona International Speedway is a superspeedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... Lowes Motor Speedway (formerly Charlotte Motor Speedway) is a speedway in Concord, North Carolina, north of Charlotte. ... Atlanta Motor Speedway is a superspeedway in Hampton, Georgia, USA, 20 miles (32 km) south of Atlanta. ... Texas Motor Speedway is a superspeedway located in the northernmost portion of the U.S. city of Fort Worth, Texas -- the portion located in Denton County, Texas. ... The California Speedway is a two-mile, low-banked, D-shaped oval superspeedway in Fontana, California, similar to that of sister track Michigan International Speedway. ... Michigan International Speedway is a two-mile (3. ... Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... Pocono Raceway is a superspeedway located in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania at Long Pond; it is the site of two annual NASCAR Nextel Cup races held just a few weeks apart in June and July. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... New Hampshire International Speedway is a 1. ... Phoenix International Raceway is a one mile tri-oval race track located in Avondale, AZ. It opened in 1964, but wasnt used by NASCAR until 1988, with the first race won by the late Alan Kulwicki. ... Infineon Raceway, formerly Sears Point Raceway, is a road course and drag strip located on the landform known as Sears Point in the southern Sonoma Mountains near Sonoma, California, USA. The course is a complex series of twists and turns that go up and down the hills. ... Watkins Glen International (nicknamed The Glen) is an auto race track located near Watkins Glen, New York at the southern tip of Seneca Lake. ... Suzuka International Racing Course (Suzuka Circuit for short) was a host of the Formula One Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix, and is one of the oldest and most-famous motorsport race tracks in Japan. ...


Race speeds vary widely based on the track. The fastest track is Talladega Superspeedway where the record race average speed is 188 mph (303 km/h) with the record qualifying lap of 212.809 mph (342.483 km/h) set by Bill Elliott in 1987. The slowest tracks are Infineon Raceway, a road course, with a record race average speed of only 81 mph (130 km/h) and qualifying lap of 99 mph (159 km/h); and Martinsville Speedway, a very short, nearly flat "paper clip" shaped oval, with a record race average speed of 82 mph (132 km/h) and a qualifying lap of only 98 mph (156 km/h). The average speed is figured out based upon the winner's race time throughout the entire race, from the waving of the green flag to the waving of the checkered flag, including laps spent under caution, divided by the number of laps. Time during red flag periods do not get added into the calculation of the average speed. Bill Elliott car that set the record for the fastest recorded time in a stock car - 212. ...


Generally, tracks with a length of less than one mile (1.6 km) are referred to as "short tracks". Initially tracks of over one mile were referred to as "superspeedways", but many Nextel Cup venues now are 1.5 miles or 2 miles (2.4 or 3 km) in length. Tracks on today's standards are now considered superspeedways if they are over 2 miles (3 km) in length. Tracks between 1 and 2 miles in length are called "intermediate" tracks.


List of Nextel Cup Series Tracks

List of current Nextel Cup series tracks
Atlanta Motor Speedway
Hampton, GA
Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, TN
California Speedway
Fontana, CA
Chicagoland Speedway
Joliet, IL
Darlington Raceway
Darlington, SC
Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, FL
Dover International Speedway
Dover, DE
Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead, FL
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Speedway, IN
Infineon Raceway
Sonoma, CA
Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, KS
Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas, NV
Lowe's Motor Speedway
Concord, NC
Martinsville Speedway
Martinsville, VA
Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, MI
New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon, NH
Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, AZ
Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, PA
Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, VA
Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, AL
Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, TX
Watkins Glen International
Watkins Glen, NY

Atlanta Motor Speedway is a superspeedway in Hampton, Georgia, USA, 20 miles (32 km) south of Atlanta. ... Hampton is a city located in western Henry County and partially in the Clayton County panhandle region, in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Grandstand in 2007 Scoring pilon in August 2007 Sign proclaiming the track the Worlds Fastest Half-Mile in 2007 Bristol Motor Speedway, originally known as Bristol International Raceway and Bristol Raceway is a NASCAR short track located in Bristol, Tennessee. ... State Street separates Virginia (left) and Tennessee (right). ... The California Speedway is a two-mile, low-banked, D-shaped oval superspeedway in Fontana, California, similar to that of sister track Michigan International Speedway. ... Location of Fontana in California Coordinates: , Country State County San Bernardino Incorporated (city) 1952-06-25 [2] Government  - Mayor Mark Nuaimi [1] Area  - City  36. ... Chicagoland Speedway is a speedway in Joliet, Illinois, USA, southwest of Chicago. ... Incorporated City in 1834. ... Darlington Raceway during the 2006 Dodge Charger 500. ... Darlington is a city in Darlington County, in northeastern South Carolina. ... Daytona International Speedway is a superspeedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... Daytona Beach in 2005 Daytona Beach is a city in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Dover International Speedway (nickname: The Monster Mile) is a NASCAR race track located near Dover, Delaware. ... : The State Capital since 1777 United States Delaware Kent 22. ... Homestead-Miami Speedway is a speedway in Homestead, Florida, USA, southwest of Miami. ... Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Miami-Dade Established 1913 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Roscoe Warren Area  - City  14. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Nickname: Home of the 500 Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Marion Government  - Town Council Area  - City  4. ... Infineon Raceway, formerly Sears Point Raceway, is a road course and drag strip located on the landform known as Sears Point in the southern Sonoma Mountains near Sonoma, California, USA. The course is a complex series of twists and turns that go up and down the hills. ... Sonoma City Hall in the town plaza Sonoma is a historically significant town in Sonoma Valley, Sonoma County, California, USA. Sonoma is centered around its historic town plaza, a remnant of the towns Spanish colonial past. ... Kansas Speedway is a speedway in Kansas City, in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Las Vegas Motor Speedway, located at 7000 Las Vegas Boulevard North in Las Vegas, Nevada, is a 1,200 acre (4. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... Lowes Motor Speedway (formerly Charlotte Motor Speedway) is a speedway in Concord, North Carolina, north of Charlotte. ... Concord is a city located in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, a suburb of Charlotte. ... Martinsville Speedway is an International Speedway Corporation owned NASCAR stock car racing track located in Martinsville, Virginia. ... Martinsville is an independent city located within the confines of Henry County, Virginia. ... Michigan International Speedway is a two-mile (3. ... Brooklyn (formerly Swainsville) is a village in Jackson County of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... NHIS New Hampshire Motor Speedway is a 1. ... Location in Merrimack County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack County Incorporated 1773  - Board of Selectmen Dustin Bowles Roger Maxfield Steven R. Ives Area    - Town 123. ... Phoenix International Raceway is a one mile tri-oval race track located in Avondale, AZ. It opened in 1964, but wasnt used by NASCAR until 1988, with the first race won by the late Alan Kulwicki. ... Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Government  - Mayor Marie Lopez Rogers Area  - Total 41. ... Pocono Raceway is a superspeedway located in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania at Long Pond; it is the site of two annual NASCAR Nextel Cup races held just a few weeks apart in June and July. ... Long Pond, Pennsylvania is a location in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania, a part of the Appalachian Mountains. ... Richmond International Raceway (RIR) is a A 3/4 mile, D shaped, asphalt race track located outside Richmond, Virginia. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Talladega Superspeedway is a motorsports complex located in Talladega, Alabama. ... Talladega is a city located in Talladega County, Alabama. ... Texas Motor Speedway is a superspeedway located in the northernmost portion of the U.S. city of Fort Worth, Texas -- the portion located in Denton County, Texas. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant, Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City 298. ... Watkins Glen International (nicknamed The Glen) is an auto race track located near Watkins Glen, New York at the southern tip of Seneca Lake. ... Watkins Glen is a village located in Schuyler County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 2,149. ...

Manufacturer Representation

Grand National Era (1949-1971)

Chrysler
Ford

The Thunderbird raced as a distinct brand against other Ford models in the manufacturer's championship. The Coronet was a full-size car from Dodge in the 1950s, initially the divisions highest trim line but, starting in 1955, the lowest trim line. ... 1957 Chrysler 300C The Chrysler 300 letter series were high-performance luxury cars built in very limited numbers by the Chrysler Corporation in the United States between 1955 and 1965. ... The Plymouth Belvedere was an American automobile produced from 1951 through 1970. ... 1970 Plymouth Road Runner with Hemi engine and Air Grabber retractable hood scoop The Plymouth Road Runner was a car built by Plymouth in the United States between 1968 and 1980. ... The short-lived Plymouth Road Runner Superbird, a sister design to the Dodge Charger Daytona, was designed to beat the Ford Torino Talladega at NASCAR stock car racing and to lure Richard Petty back to Plymouth. ... There have been many different Dodge vehicles, on three different platforms, bearing the Charger nameplate. ... Dodge, an American automobile brand, has produced three separate vehicles with the name Dodge Charger Daytona, all of which were modified Dodge Chargers. ... DeSoto Logo, used in the 1950s The DeSoto (sometimes De Soto) was a brand of automobile based in the United States, marketed by the Chrysler Corporation from 1928 to 1961. ... 1955 Ford Fairlane Crown Victoria 1957 Ford Fairlane 1966 Ford Fairlane GTA 1997 Ford Fairlane Ghia The Ford Fairlane was an automobile model sold between 1955 and 1971 by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... 1971 Mercury Monterey Hardtop Sedan The Mercury Monterey was introduced in 1950 as a full-size semi-luxury car. ... 1960 promotional art used in Comet advertising The Mercury Comet was an automobile produced by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company between 1960 and 1977. ... 1971 Mercury Cyclone GT Engine: 351 2-bbl, 240 hp @ 4000 rpm Quantity built in 1971: 2,287 Factory price new: $3,681. ... The Ford Torino was an intermediate sized car produced by the Ford Motor Company for the North American market between 1968 and 1976. ... The Ford Torino Talladega was a car produced by the Ford Motor Company during 1969 only. ... The Ford Thunderbird was a car manufactured in the United States by the Ford Motor Company. ... Lincoln is an American luxury automobile brand, operated under the Ford Motor Company. ... Mercury is an automobile brand name of the Ford Motor Company founded in 1939 to market semi-luxury cars slotted between entry-level Ford and luxury Lincoln models. ... 1966 Ford Galaxie 7 Litre Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ford Galaxie For other uses, see Galaxie (disambiguation). ...

GM
Others

This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Oldsmobile 88 was a full-size car sold by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors and produced from 1949 until 1999. ... The Pontiac Chieftan was an automobile produced by the Pontiac Motors Division of General Motors from 1949 to 1958. ... 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Hardtop 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Interior 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-door sedan 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Sport Sedan The Chevrolet Bel Air was an automobile series produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors from... 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible The Chevrolet Impala is an automobile built for the Chevrolet division by General Motors. ... 1964 Pontiac Catalina 2-door hardtop The Pontiac Catalina was part of Pontiacs full-sized automobile line. ... 1965 Pontiac GTO convertible The Pontiac GTO was an automobile built by Pontiac from 1964 to 1974, and by General Motors Holden in Australia from 2004 to 2006. ... The Pontiac Grand Prix is an automobile produced by the Pontiac division of General Motors. ... Image:1971GranSport. ... Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... For other uses, see Cadillac (disambiguation). ... Advertisement for the 1954 Hudson Hornet The Hudson Hornet was an automobile produced by the Hudson Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan between 1951 and 1954. ... Studebaker Corporation, or simply Studebaker, was a United States wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. ... Nash may refer to: // Nash, Buckinghamshire, England Nash, Herefordshire, England Nash, Bromley, London Borough Nash, Newport, Wales Nash, Telford and Wrekin, former village in Shropshire, England Nash, South Shropshire, England Nash Lee, Buckinghamshire, England Nash Mills, Hertfordshire, England Nash, Oklahoma, a town Nash, Texas, a city Nash, North Dakota, a... Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ...

Winston Cup (1972-2003)

American Motors
Chrysler
Ford
GM

1974 Matador rebuilt as a replica of a Police Car from The Dukes of Hazzard Second generation 1975 Matador base model sedan The AMC Matador was an intermediate car built and sold by the American Motors Corporation (AMC) from 1971 to 1978. ... There have been many different Dodge vehicles, on three different platforms, bearing the Charger nameplate. ... The Dodge Intrepid was a large four-door, full-size, front-wheel drive sedan. ... The Dodge Magnum name has been used on a number of different automobiles. ... Plymouth dealers gave away this promotional windbreaker in 1970. ... The Ford Torino was an intermediate sized car produced by the Ford Motor Company for the North American market between 1968 and 1976. ... The Ford Thunderbird was a car manufactured in the United States by the Ford Motor Company. ... The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... 1971 Mercury Cyclone GT Engine: 351 2-bbl, 240 hp @ 4000 rpm Quantity built in 1971: 2,287 Factory price new: $3,681. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mercury Montego The Mercury Montego, (presumably derived from Montego Bay, Jamaica) was a mid-size vehicle in Fords Mercury line. ... The Buick Regal is a mid-size car produced by General Motors Buick division from 1973 through 2004, during which Buick also used the Century name on mid-size models; the two frequently shared bodies and powertrains. ... The Buick LeSabre was a full-size car made by the Buick division of General Motors from 1959-2005. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Chevrolet Caprice (later called Caprice Classic) was a series name of automobile produced by Chevrolet, a division of General Motors, in the United States from the 1965 through 1996 model years. ... 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible 1958 Chevrolet Impala Convertible The Chevrolet Impala is an automobile built for the Chevrolet division by General Motors. ... See Chevrolet Lumina (Australia) for the Australian built vehicle of the same name. ... The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American mid-size car. ... The Oldsmobile Cutlass was an automobile made by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors. ... A 1950s Olds Rocket 88, still running in 2003 The Oldsmobile 88 was a fullsize car from General Motors produced from 1949 until 1999. ... The Pontiac Grand Prix is an automobile produced by the Pontiac division of General Motors. ...

NEXTEL Cup (2004-2007)

Chrysler
Ford
GM
Toyota

The Dodge Intrepid was a large four-door, full-size, front-wheel drive sedan. ... There have been many different Dodge vehicles, on three different platforms, bearing the Charger nameplate. ... DODGE AVENGERS SUCK MONKEY PENIS The Dodge Avenger is actually three different cars: The Dodge Avenger coupe (1995-2000) The Dodge Avenger Concept from the 2003 North American International Auto Show The Dodge Avenger (JS) sedan released in 2007 for the 2008 model year. ... This article is about the NASCAR car style. ... The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... Ford Fusion is a name used on two different types of cars from the Ford Motor Company. ... The Chevrolet Monte Carlo was an American mid-size car. ... The Chevrolet Monte Carlo is an American mid-size car. ... 1968 Chevrolet Impala at the weekly Garden Grove, California car show on April 16, 2004. ... This article is about the NASCAR car style. ... The Pontiac Grand Prix is an automobile produced by the Pontiac division of General Motors. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ...

Sprint Cup (2008-Future)

Chrysler
Ford
GM
Toyota

DODGE AVENGERS SUCK MONKEY PENIS The Dodge Avenger is actually three different cars: The Dodge Avenger coupe (1995-2000) The Dodge Avenger Concept from the 2003 North American International Auto Show The Dodge Avenger (JS) sedan released in 2007 for the 2008 model year. ... Ford Fusion is a name used on two different types of cars from the Ford Motor Company. ... 1968 Chevrolet Impala at the weekly Garden Grove, California car show on April 16, 2004. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ...

NASCAR NEXTEL Cup statistics

  • The last GN/Cup race on a dirt track was held on September 30, 1970 at the half-mile State Fairgrounds Speedway in Raleigh, North Carolina. It was won by Richard Petty in a Plymouth that had been sold by Petty Enterprises to Don Robertson and rented back for the race.[3]
  • The youngest modern era (1972-present) champion was Jeff Gordon in 1995 at age 24, the oldest was Bobby Allison in 1983, at 45. (Allison turned 46 during the awards banquet.) Bill Rexford won the 1950 Championship at the age of 23, making him the youngest champion all time.
  • Benny Parsons, Bill Rexford, Ned Jarrett, and Matt Kenseth are the only series champions to have one single series victory and still win the title. No drivers have gone an entire season without winning a race, and still winning the championship. For Bill Rexford, that was his only career win.
  • Alan Kulwicki was the last owner/driver to win the series title; Dale Earnhardt was the last to win it for a single car team, as RCR did not become a regular two-car team until 1997. It is considered difficult to accomplish either feat today.
  • Tony Stewart and Cale Yarborough are the only drivers to finish last in the Daytona 500 and go on to win the NEXTEL Cup series title in the same season.
  • Cale Yarborough is the only driver ever to win three consecutive championships (1976, 1977, 1978).
  • The only teammates to win NEXTEL Cup Series titles are:
  1. Terry Labonte, Jeff Gordon, and Jimmie Johnson (Hendrick Motorsports)
  2. Kurt Busch and Matt Kenseth (Roush Racing)
  3. Bobby Labonte and Tony Stewart (Joe Gibbs Racing)
  • Richard Petty is the single-season winningest driver with an unprecedented 27 wins in 1967; additionally, that season he was also the first to break the $100,000 barrier in earnings. The 27 wins took place in a 48-race season (although there were 49 races, the 100-mile qualifying races for the Daytona 500 were championship races until the 1971 minimum distance requirement, and actually took 51 weeks, from November 13, 1966 (Augusta, GA) until November 5, 1967 (Weaverville, NC). Richard Petty holds the modern era record with 13 wins (in 30 races) in a season. Jeff Gordon also has 13 wins (1998), but his 13 wins took place in a 33-race season, with his thirteenth win being in the 33rd (and final) race. (Petty's 1975 season had his thirteenth win in the 30th race.)
  • Two champions are sons of previous champions: Dale Jarrett is Ned Jarrett's son and Richard Petty is Lee Petty's son. Terry and Bobby Labonte are the only brother combination to have won championships.
  • The Daytona 500 was not always the first points race of the year. NASCAR used to run at Riverside before going to Daytona in 1965 and 1970-1981. Until 1972, the qualifying races were points races. Beginning in 1982, NASCAR decided to begin each season with the Daytona 500.

is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... State Fairgrounds Speedway, located at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh, North Carolina, was a half-mile oval dirt racetrack which was the site of auto races for NASCARs top series in 1955, 1969, and 1970. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jeffery Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971) is a professional American race car driver. ... Benny Parsons (born July 12, 1941 in Detroit, Michigan, currently resides in Charlotte, North Carolina) is an American NASCAR announcer/analyst on NBC and TNT. He became famous as the 1973 NASCAR Winston Cup (now NEXTEL Cup) champion. ... Bill Rexford (March 14, 1927-April 18, 1994) was a stock car driver in the early 1950s. ... Ned Jarrett (born October 12, 1932 in Newton, North Carolina) was a two-time NASCAR champion. ... Matt Kenseths 2004 car being pushed out by his crew 2007 Busch Series car 2007 Cup car Matthew Roy Kenseth (born March 10, 1972) is a stock car racing driver for the Roush Fenway Racing team in NASCARs Nextel Cup series. ... Alan Kulwicki (December 14, 1954 - April 1, 1993) was an American NASCAR driver. ... Richard Childress Racing is a NASCAR team fielding Chevrolets for Kevin Harvick (#29 Royal Dutch Shell), Clint Bowyer (#07 Jack Daniels) Jeff Burton (#31 (Cingular Wireless/AT&T), full-time, and Scott Wimmer (#33 Holiday Inn part-time in the Nextel Cup series, as well as the #2 BB... Hendrick Motorsports is a group of NASCAR racing teams started by Rick Hendrick in 1984 under the name All Star Racing, racing only Chevrolets, racing in both the Nextel Cup and Busch Series circuits. ... Outside Roush headquarters. ... Joe Gibbs Racing (also known as JGR) is a group of NASCAR racing teams owned by Joe Gibbs, who first started racing on the NASCAR circuit in 1991. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Gatorade Duel, is NASCAR Nextel Cup preliminary event to the Daytona 500 held annually in February at Daytona International Speedway. ... Dale Arnold Jarrett (born November 26, 1956 in Newton, North Carolina) is an American race car driver. ... Ned Jarrett (born October 12, 1932 in Newton, North Carolina) was a two-time NASCAR champion. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Lee Petty (March 14, 1914 (near Randleman, North Carolina) - April 5, 2000) was an American stock car driver in the 1950s and 60s. ... Terrance Lee Labonte (born November 16, 1956, in Corpus Christi, Texas) is a former NASCAR driver. ... Robert Alan Labonte (born May 8, 1964) is an American race car driver and drives the #43 Cheerios Dodge Charger for the Petty Enterprises NASCAR Racing Team in the Nextel Cup Series and the #77 Dollar General Chevrolet Monte Carlo for Kevin Harvick Incorporated in the Busch Series. ... Riverside International Raceway (Sometimes known as RIR or Riverside Raceway) was a race track or road course in Riverside, California. ...

Manufacturers Champion

Sprint Cup

  • 2008 TBD

NEXTEL Cup

Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ...

Winston Cup

1992 Winston Cup trophy, won by Alan Kulwicki
1992 Winston Cup trophy, won by Alan Kulwicki

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 433 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (951 × 1,317 pixels, file size: 459 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Royalbroil and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 433 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (951 × 1,317 pixels, file size: 459 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Royalbroil and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Alan Kulwicki (December 14, 1954 - April 1, 1993) was an American NASCAR driver. ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... This article is about Pontiac automobiles; for the Native American leader, see Chief Pontiac, for other uses see the Pontiac (disambiguation). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Oldsmobile is a brand of automobile produced for most of its existence by General Motors. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Dodge is a North American brand of automobiles and light to heavy-duty trucks from Chrysler, sold globally. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Mercury is an automobile marque of the Ford Motor Company founded in 1939 to market near-luxury cars slotted between entry-level Ford and luxury Lincoln models, similar to General Motors Buick (and former Oldsmobile) brand and Chryslers Chrysler brand. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.nascar.com/2007/news/headlines/cup/07/06/sprint.nextel.cup.name.change/index.html
  2. ^ "Strictly Stock Standings and Statistics for 1949" page of Racing-Reference website [1], retrieved 9 May 2007.
  3. ^ a b Fielden, Greg, "NASCAR Cleans Up", Speedway Illustrated, September 2004.
  4. ^ Mitchell, Jason, "How Do They Do That?: Winston Cup Point System", Stock Car Racing (ISSN 0734-7340), Volume 36, Number 10, October 2001.
  5. ^ http://www.nascar.com/2007/news/headlines/cup/07/06/sprint.nextel.cup.name.change/index.html
  6. ^ Speedtv.comArticle on COT changes
  7. ^ Moving up the timeline; NASCAR wants Car of Tomorrow full-time next year. Associated Press (February 28, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  8. ^ NASCAR.comArticle explaining brake systems
  9. ^ Russwicks.comarticle on the speed record
  10. ^ About.comarticle with horsepower specifics
  11. ^ SpeedTV.com article on COT restrictor plate's hosepower increase

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
NASCAR Nextel Cup

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The 2007 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup season began on February 10, 2007 at Daytona International Speedway with the Budweiser Shootout and will end with the Ford 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 18 of that same year. ... This is a list of National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) champions; that is, a list of all the champions in NASCARs three major series (NEXTEL Cup, Busch Series, and Craftsman Truck Series). ... As of the end of the 2007 UAW-Ford 500 held at Talladega Superspeedway on October 7, 2007. ... This is a list of NASCAR teams, a list of all teams that race in one of NASCARs top three divisions (NEXTEL Cup, Busch Series and Craftsman Truck Series). ... // All statistics used in these tables are as of the end of the 2007 USG Sheetrock 400 race. ... 12. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations... The NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series is a popular NASCAR racing series that features modified pickup trucks. ... The NEXTEL Cup is a trophy that is awarded to the winner of the NASCAR stock car racing series of the same name. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Star-Telegram.com: | 11/25/2007 | Nextel Cup champion Johnson had an unbeatable season (1742 words)
Voting for 2007 Driver of the Year is scheduled for Tuesday, and two-time/reigning NASCAR Nextel Cup Series champion Jimmie Johnson appears to be a slam dunk.
Beginning with Sir Jeff in 1997, Cup drivers have won eight of the last 10 DOYs, a trend consistent with NASCAR's status as the 800-pound gorilla of domestic motorsports.
His series-leading 10 victories, domination of the 2007 Chase for the Nextel Cup and back-to-back championships have marked Johnson (and crew chief Chad Knaus) as the elitest of NASCAR's elite.
Nextel Cup again lacks close finish -- baltimoresun.com (713 words)
Nextel Cup again lacks close finish -- baltimoresun.com
After Matt Kenseth turned the 2003 championship into a less-than-scintillating one-man show, NASCAR chairman Brian France decided that the time was right for a new points format.
Thus the Chase for the Nextel Cup championship was born.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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