FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Next Generation Magazine
The cover of the January '95 issue of Next Generation.
The cover of the January '95 issue of Next Generation.

Next Generation Magazine (also known as NextGen) was a video game magazine that was made by the now defunct Imagine Media publishing company. It was affiliated to and shared editorial with the UK's Edge magazine. Next Generation ran from January 1995 until January 2002. Unlike its competitors GamePro and EGM which targeted an adolescent audience, Next Generation was directed towards a more mature, adult readership by focusing on the industry itself rather than individual games. Image File history File links This is a magazine cover. ... Image File history File links This is a magazine cover. ... A video game magazine is a magazine that talks about video games on PC, other computers or video game consoles. ... 1. ... Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Cover of one of the many GamePro issues. ... Cover for issue number 203: Too Human. ...


Notable differences between Next Generation and other current video game magazines:

  • Most video game magazines rank a game in several different categories (graphics, sound, gameplay, etc.) and sometimes provide an average score based on those numbers. Next Generation's review ranking system, on the other hand, was based on a number of stars (1 through 5), that ranked games based on their merits overall compared to what games were already out there.
  • Its content didn't focus on screenshots, walkthroughs, and cheat codes. Instead the content was more focused on the game industry from an artistic perspective.
  • Its interviews with people in the gaming industry often featured questions about gaming in general rather than about the details of the latest game or game system they were working on.
  • Next Generation had a few editorial sections like The Way Games Ought To Be (originally written every month by game designer Chris Crawford) that would attempt to provide constructive criticism on standard practices in the video game industry.
  • The magazine's construction and design also differed from its competitors. The design was decidedly simple and clean, its back cover having no advertising on it initially, a departure from most other gaming magazines. The first several years of Next Generation had a heavy matte finish cover stock, unlike the glossy paper covers of its compeitors. The magazine moved away from this cover style in early 1999, only for it to return again in late 2000.

In September 1999, Next Generation was redesigned, its cover name shortened to simply "NextGen". This would start what was known as "Lifecycle 2" of the magazine. A year later, in September 2000, the magazine's width was increased from its standard 8 inches to 9 inches, however this wider format would last less than a year. A screenshot of the Wikipedia website, taken on Debian GNU/Linux running the X Window system A screenshot, screen dump, or screen capture is an image taken by the computer to record the visible items on the monitor or another visual output device, usually this is a digital image taken... A walkthrough is a term describing the consideration of a process at an abstract level. ... Cheat codes are codes that can be entered into a computer game to change the games behaviour. ... The computer and video game industry is the economic sector involved with the development, marketing and sale of video and computer games. ... A video game console is a dedicated electronic machine designed to play video games. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Chris Crawford is a noted computer game designer and writer, responsible for a number of important games in the 1980s, for founding The Journal of Computer Game Design and for organizing the Computer Game Developers Conference. ... Constructive criticism is the process of offering valid and well-reasoned opinions about the work of others, usually involving both positive and negative comments, in a friendly manner rather than an oppositional one. ... The computer and video game industry is the economic sector involved with the development, marketing and sale of video and computer games. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ...


The brand was resurrected in 2005 by Future Publishing USA as an industry-led website, at http://www.next-gen.biz/.-1...

Contents


Issue History

Lifecycle 1

Issue Cover
v1 #1 (1/1995) Virtua Fighter 2
v1 #2 (2/1995) Online Gaming
v1 #3 (3/1995) Sony PlayStation
v1 #4 (4/1995) Atari Jaguar
v1 #5 (5/1995) Ultra 64
v1 #6 (6/1995) Crossfire
v1 #7 (7/1995) Wipeout
v1 #8 (8/1995) Sega Saturn TV Commercials
v1 #9 (9/1995) Destruction Derby
v1 #10 (10/1995) Madden NFL '96
v1 #11 (11/1995) Virtua Fighter's Sarah Bryant
v1 #12 (12/1995) 32-bit Videogame Report
v2 #13 (1/1996) Ridge Racer Revolution
v2 #14 (2/1996) Super Mario 64
v2 #15 (3/1996) HyperBlade
v2 #16 (4/1996) MDK
v2 #17 (5/1996) Tenka
v2 #18 (6/1996) Bill Gates
v2 #19 (7/1996) NiGHTS
v2 #20 (8/1996) Super Mario 64
v2 #21 (9/1996) Top 100 Videogames of All Time
v2 #22 (10/1996) Tomb Raider
v2 #23 (11/1996) Interstate '76
v2 #24 (12/1996) PlayStation vs Nintendo 64 vs Sega Saturn
v3 #25 (1/1997) Sony's Net Yarouze
v3 #26 (2/1997) Unreal
v3 #27 (3/1997) Bomberman
v3 #28 (4/1997) Super GT
v3 #29 (5/1997) Something is Wrong With Nintendo 64
v3 #30 (6/1997) Kings Quest: Mask of Eternity
v3 #31 (7/1997) Blasto
v3 #32 (8/1997) Lost World
v3 #33 (9/1997) Messiah
v3 #34 (10/1997) Battlezone
v3 #35 (11/1997) 25 Breakthrough Games
v3 #36 (12/1997) Game Machine of the Year
v4 #37 (1/1998) America's Elite
v4 #38 (2/1998) You are not a Hardcore Gamer. Unless...
v4 #39 (3/1998) Ultima IX
v4 #40 (4/1998) Metal Gear Solid
v4 #41 (5/1998) Pince of Persia 3D
v4 #42 (6/1998) Zelda
v4 #43 (7/1998) Knockout Kings
v4 #44 (8/1998) The Battle Begins
v4 #45 (9/1998) Dreamcast
v4 #46 (10/1998) Star Wars
v4 #47 (11/1998) Ridge Racer Type 4
v4 #48 (12/1998) Zelda Ocarina of Time
v5 #49 (1/1999) Tomb Raider 3
v5 #50 (2/1999) Final Fantasy 8
v5 #51 (3/1999) Dreamcast
v5 #52 (4/1999) Unreal Tournament vs Team Fortress
v5 #53 (5/1999) Star Wars Episode I
v5 #54 (6/1999) Dino Crisis
v5 #55 (7/1999) Soul Calibur
v5 #56 (8/1999) Resident Evil 3

Lifecycle 2

Issue Cover
v1 #1 (9/1999) Ready 2 Rumble
v1 #2 (10/1999) Shenmue
v1 #3 (11/1999) PlayStation 2 is Here!
v1 #4 (12/1999) The Console War Explodes!
v2 #1 (1/2000) Resident Evil Code Veronica
v2 #2 (2/2000) Tekken Tag Tournament
v2 #3 (3/2000) Bond
v2 #4 (4/2000) PlayStation 2 Hands-On Report
v2 #5 (5/2000) Dreamcast: Now it's Free
v2 #6 (6/2000) Onimusha
v2 #7 (7/2000) Metal Gear Solid 2
v2 #8 (8/2000) Xbox
v2 #9 (9/2000) Ready 2 Rumble: Round 2
v2 #10 (10/2000) The Bouncer
v2 #11 (11/2000) Nintendo's Gamecube
v2 #12 (12/2000) Crash Bandicoot
v3 #1 (1/2001) Got Talent?
v3 #2 (2/2001) Sex & Violence
v3 #3 (3/2001) Dreamcast
v3 #4 (4/2001) The Games of Xbox
v3 #5 (5/2001) Halo
v3 #6 (6/2001) Rogue Squadron II
v3 #7 (7/2001) E3 2001
v3 #8 (8/2001) Gamecube Blowout
v3 #9 (9/2001) Devil May Cry
v3 #10 (10/2001) Dead or Alive 3
v3 #11 (11/2001) Maximo
v3 #12 (12/2001) Soul Calibur 2
v4 #1 (1/2002) Ultimate Xbox Review Guide

External links

  • Wayback link for Next Generation Online
  • Wayback link for Imagine Publishing
  • Rumor site about the end of Next Generation magazine and Imagine Media

  Results from FactBites:
 
Next Generation Magazine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (512 words)
Next Generation Magazine (also known as NextGen) was a video game magazine that was made by the now defunct Imagine Media publishing company.
A year later, in September 2000, the magazine's width was increased from its standard 8 inches to 9 inches, however this wider format lasted less than a year.
Next Generation had a few editorial sections like "The Way Games Ought To Be" (originally written every month by game designer Chris Crawford) that would attempt to provide constructive criticism on standard practices in the video game industry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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