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Encyclopedia > Newtonian mechanics
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Classical mechanics. (Discuss)


This page is about Newtonian mechanics specifically. For information about Classical mechanics, see its page Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Classical mechanics is a branch of physics which studies the deterministic motion of objects. ... Classical mechanics is a branch of physics which studies the deterministic motion of objects. ...


Newtonian mechanics is the original version of the physical discipline of mechanics, due to Sir Isaac Newton, who developed the theory over a period from about 1664, until the publication of his great work, known as the Principia, in 1687. Mechanics is the branch of Physics concerned with the motion of physical bodies, the forces that cause or limit these motions, and the forces to which bodies may, in turn, give rise. ... Sir Isaac Newton, President of the Royal Society, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727] was an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, alchemist, chemist, inventor, and natural philosopher. ... Newtons own copy of his Principia, with hand written corrections for the second edition. ...


While Newton chose to present the work in classical geometric form, for acceptance, much of the foregoing development of the theory was actually based on his invention of the calculus of infinitesimals, as a new discipline of mathematics. It was eventually in this form, which laid the foundation of so much of today's science and mathematics, along with the differential calculus of G.W. von Leibniz, that Newtonian mechanics evolved into the theory of classical mechanics. This development, over two centuries, was due to a great many scientists, including L. Euler, J.L. Lagrange, P.S. de Laplace, W.R. Hamilton, C.G. Jacobi, and countless others. Calculus is a central branch of mathematics, developed from algebra and geometry. ... In mathematics, an infinitesimal, or infinitely small number, is a number that is greater in absolute value than zero yet smaller than any positive real number. ... Euclid, a famous Greek mathematician known as the father of geometry, is shown here in detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Differential calculus is the theory of and computations with differentials; see also derivative and calculus. ... Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (also Leibnitz or von Leibniz)[1] (July 1 (June 21 Old Style) 1646, Leipzig – November 14, 1716, Hanover) was a German polymath of Sorbian origin, deemed a universal genius in his day and since. ... Classical mechanics is a branch of physics which studies the deterministic motion of objects. ... Leonhard Euler by Emanuel Handmann. ... Joseph Louis Lagrange Joseph Louis Lagrange (January 25, 1736 – April 10, 1813; born Giuseppe Luigi Lagrangia in Turin, Lagrange moved to Paris (1787) and became a French citizen, adopting the French translation of his name, Joseph Louis Lagrange) was an Italian-French mathematician and astronomer who made important contributions to... Pierre-Simon Laplace Pierre-Simon Laplace (March 23, 1749 – March 5, 1827) was a French mathematician and astronomer, the discoverer of the Laplace transform and Laplaces equation. ... William Rowan Hamilton Sir William Rowan Hamilton (August 4, 1805 – September 2, 1865) was an Irish mathematician, physicist, and astronomer who made important contributions to the development of optics, dynamics, and algebra. ... Karl Gustav Jacob Jacobi (Potsdam December 10, 1804 - Berlin February 18, 1851), was not only a great German mathematician but also considered by many as the most inspiring teacher of his time (Bell, p. ...


Newtonian Kinematics

Isaac Newton's mathematical studies led him to the development of the Newtonian Kinematics, which involve the movement of objects due to its moved distance, initial and final velocities, acceleration, and elapsed time. The equations regarding the movement of objects follow three simple equations. Sir Isaac Newton, President of the Royal Society, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727] was an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, alchemist, chemist, inventor, and natural philosopher. ...


References

  • Js. Newton, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, London 1687. Transl. by A. Motte (1729), and F. Cajori: Sir Isaac Newton's Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy and his System of the World, University of California Press, Berkeley 1934.
  • Richard S. Westfall, Never at rest, A biography of Isaac Newton, Cambridge U. Press 1980.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Classical mechanics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2714 words)
In physics, classical mechanics is one of the two major sub-fields of study in the science of mechanics, which is concerned with the set of physical laws governing and mathematically describing the motions of bodies and aggregates of bodies.
While the terms classical mechanics and Newtonian mechanics are usually considered equivalent, the conventional content of classical mechanics was created in the 19th century and differs considerably (particularly in its use of analytical mathematics) from the work of Newton.
Classical mechanics is used to describe the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, as well as astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars, and galaxies, and even microscopic objects such as large molecules.
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