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Encyclopedia > News of the World
Type Weekly newspaper
Format Tabloid

Owner News Group Newspapers
(News International)
Editor Colin Myler
Founded 1843
Political allegiance Right-Wing
Headquarters Wapping, London

Website: www.newsoftheworld.co.uk/

The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. It is published by News Group Newspapers of News International, itself a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, and can be considered the Sunday equivalent of The Sun. The newspaper tends to concentrate on lighter-weight news stories, such as celebrity gossip. Its fondness for sex scandals has gained it the nicknames "Sex 'n' Scandal weekly", "News of the Screws" and "Screws of the World". It is Britain's biggest selling newspaper, selling an average of 3,445,459 copies per week in October 2006 [1]. Former editor Andy Coulson resigned on the 26 January 2007 over the Royal Phone Tapping Scandal.[2] He has been replaced with Colin Myler, the former editor of the Sunday Mirror who has latterly been working at the New York Post. Previous editors of the paper include Rebekah Wade who replaced Phil Hall in 2000. Image File history File links News_of_the_World. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Wapping Old Stairs, one of many points of access to the foreshore in the area. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest[] newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Rebekah Wade (born May 27, 1968 in Cheshire, England) is a British journalist and newspaper editor. ...

Contents

History

The newspaper was first published on October 1, 1843, in London by John Browne Bell. Priced at just three pence, even before the repeal of the Stamp Act (1855) or paper duty (1861), it was the cheapest newspaper of its time and was aimed directly at the newly literate working classes. It quickly established itself as a purveyor of titillation, shock and criminal news. Despite being dismissed as a "scandal sheet" it soon established itself as the most widely read Sunday paper. Initial sales were around 12,000 copies a week. This success encouraged other similar newspapers, of which the Sunday People, the Daily Mail, the Daily Express and the Daily Mirror are still being published. October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A stamp act is a law enacted by a government that requires a tax to be paid on the transfer of certain documents such as property deeds. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... The People, formerly known as the Sunday People, is a British red-top Sunday-only newspaper, owned by the Trinity Mirror Group. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, a tabloid, first published in 1896. ... The Daily Express is a conservative, middle-market British tabloid newspaper. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ...


Its motto was "All human life is there".


Murdoch purchase

The newspaper passed into the hands of Rupert Murdoch's News Ltd. in 1969, snatching the paper from Robert Maxwell's Pergamon Press after an acrimonious year-long struggle. It was Murdoch's first "Fleet Street" acquisition. Maxwell had been supported by the Jackson family (25% shareholders), but Murdoch had gained the support of the Carr family (30%) and then-chairman William Carr. Maxwell accused Murdoch of employing "the laws of the jungle" to acquire the paper and said he had "made a fair and bona fide offer... which has been frustrated and defeated after three months of [cynical] manoeuvring." Murdoch denied this, arguing the shareholders of the News of the World Group had "judged [his] record in Australia." News Limited was the principal holding for the business interests of Rupert Murdoch until the formation of News Corporation in 1979. ... Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991), British media proprietor, rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing business. ... Pergamon Press was a United Kingdom based publishing house, founded by Robert Maxwell, which published general science books. ... Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ...


The newspaper has often had to defend itself from libel charges and complaints to the Press Complaints Commission as a result of certain news-gathering techniques, such as entrapment, and contentious campaigns. Some of the best-known cases have been the "Bob and Sue" case with reporter Neville Thurlbeck, and various cases involving journalist Mahzer Mahmood. [3] [4] In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... The Press Complaints Commission is a British organisation that has regulated printed newspapers and magazines since 1990. ... Mazher Mahmood is an undercover reporter for the British newspaper News of the World. ...


Anti-Paedophile Campaign

The paper began a controversial campaign to name and shame alleged paedophiles in 2000 following the abduction and murder of Sarah Payne. The paper also campaigns for the introduction of 'Sarah's Law' to allow public access to the Sex Offenders Register. Pedophilia, paedophilia or pædophilia (see spelling differences) is the paraphilia of being sexually attracted primarily or exclusively to prepubescent or peripubescent children. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Sarah Payne (13 October 1991 - 1 July 2000), was the victim of a notable murder in England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sarah Payne. ... In about the last ten years or so, many jurisdictions, especially in the United States, have passed laws requiring sex offenders, especially child sex offenders, upon conviction or subsequent release from prison, to register with the police where they live. ...


Ironically, the issue which announced the campaign also contained a centre page spread of former Atomic Kitten star Kerry Katona posing topless in a series of pictures taken when she was aged 16 [citation needed]. Atomic Kitten are an English girl group from Liverpool composed of Liz Lil McClarnon, Natasha Tash Hamilton, and Jenny Frost, who replaced original member Kerry Katona in January 2001. ... Kerry Jayne Elizabeth Katona (previously Kerry McFadden) (born 6 September 1980 in Warrington, Cheshire, England) is an English television presenter and former pop singer with girl band Atomic Kitten. ...


Libel Actions Brought Against the News of the World

  • In 2005 England soccer captain David Beckham and his wife Victoria brought a legal action against the paper seeking libel damages over an article that carried the headline: "Posh and Becks on the Rocks." The legal action was withdrawn in 2006 and "resolved on a confidential basis," according to the couple's spokeswoman Jo Milloy.
  • In April 2006 England footballer Wayne Rooney received £100,000 in damages from the publishers of The News of the World and its sister paper The Sun over articles falsely reporting he had slapped his fiancée, Coleen McLoughlin. Both had always denied the reports.
  • In June 2006 England footballer Ashley Cole received damages from the publishers of The News of the World over articles falsely alleging the footballer had used a mobile phone as a gay sex toy. Together with its sister paper The Sun, The News of the World paid Cole £100,000 to settle the case
  • In July 2006 a libel action brought by the Scottish politician Tommy Sheridan came to court in Edinburgh. Sheridan denied allegations, made by the newspaper in November 2004 and January 2005, that he had an affair, engaged in group sex and attended a swinger's club in Manchester. Sheridan won the case and was awarded £200,000 in damages. The newspaper intends to appeal against the jury's decision.[5]

2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up sun in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coleen McLoughlin (born 3 April 1986 in Liverpool, Merseyside, England) is the fiancée of Manchester United F.C. and England football star, Wayne Rooney. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Ashley Cole (born 20 December 1980, Whitechapel, London, England) is an English footballer of half white and half Barbadian descent. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Sheridan v News International (Thomas Sheridan v News Group Newspapers Ltd. ... Tommy Sheridan Tommy Sheridan is a Scottish socialist politician. ... Peter Fendi, 1835 Group sex is sexual behaviour involving more than two participants at the same time. ... Swinging, sometimes referred to in North America as the swinging lifestyle, is non-monogamous sexual activity, treated much like any other social activity, that can be experienced as a couple. ...

2006 Phone Tapping Scandal

 This section documents a current event.
Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.

The News of the World's royal editor Clive Goodman and two associates were arrested on August 8, 2006 for allegedly tapping phones of members of the royal family, political figures and celebrities. The arrests were the result of a seven month investigation by Scotland Yard. The News of the World's London office was searched by police as a result of the investigation. Goodman was also suspended by the newspaper.[6] Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... Clive Goodman is a veteran royal reporter who had worked as royal editor for the News of the World, who was jailed in January 2007. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, it blowwsssss often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The investigation began as a result of a November 13 2005 article by Goodman reporting that Prince William was going to borrow a portable editing suite from ITV royal correspondent Tom Bradby. When the Prince and Bradby met they tried to figure out how the details of their arrangement had leaked out, as only four people including them had known about the arrangement. Prince William noted that another equally improbable leak had recently taken place regarding an appointment he had made with a knee surgeon. After some discussion, the two concluded that someone was breaking into mobile phone answering machine messages.[7] The voice mails that were broken into belonged to aides, and not Prince William himself.[8] HRH Prince William of Wales William Arthur Philip Louis His Royal Highness Prince William of Wales (William Arthur Philip Louis Mountbatten-Windsor) (born June 21, 1982) is a member of the British Royal Family, grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and first son of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... Tom Bradby is a journalist and novellist. ... HRH Prince William of Wales William Arthur Philip Louis His Royal Highness Prince William of Wales (William Arthur Philip Louis Mountbatten-Windsor) (born June 21, 1982) is a member of the British Royal Family, grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and first son of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. ...


Their concerns were passed along to the police, whose investigation began as a localized incident simply involving members of Clarence House. The investigation's list of possible victims has broadened to include ministers, an MP, military chiefs, a leading media figure, top footballers and celebrities.[9] Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


On January 26, 2007 Clive Goodman was jailed for four months having pleaded guilty to the phone message interception charges. On the same day, it was announced that Andy Coulson had resigned as the editor of the News of the World, having given in his notice a fortnight earlier. He was immediately replaced by Colin Myler.


2006 reward for information

On December 13, 2006 the newspaper announced that it is putting up a reward of £250,000 (a sombre new record) for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the murders in Suffolk. In December 2006, the bodies of five murdered women were discovered at different locations near Ipswich in Suffolk, England. ...


Famous Scandals Revealed

David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. ... Rebecca Loos (born in Madrid, Spain at June 19, 1977) is a glamour model who was personal assistant to David Beckham. ... Mark Oaten Mark Oaten (born 8 March 1964, Watford) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for the Winchester constituency. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... HRH Prince Harry of Wales Henry Charles Albert David His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten-Windsor) (born September 15, 1984), nicknamed Prince Harry, is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of Queen Elizabeth II. Harry is third in the line of... Cossey on the cover of her 1982 autobiography, Tula: I am a Woman Caroline Tula Cossey (born August 31, 1954, in Brooke, Norfolk), is an English actor. ... For Your Eyes Only is the twelfth film in the EON Productions James Bond series and the fifth to star Roger Moore as British Secret Service agent, Commander James Bond 007. ... Gordon Angus Deayton (born January 6, 1956) is an English comic actor and television presenter. ...

Editors

  • Colin Myler (editor, replaced Andy Coulson on January 26, 2007)
  • Neil Wallis (Deputy Editor)
  • Stuart Kuttner (Managing Editor)
  • Ian Edmondson (Assistant Editor, News)
  • Jules Stenson (Asistant Editor, Features)
  • Matt Nixson (News Editor)

Current Journalists and Writers

  • Neville Thurlbeck (mainly responsible for the Beckham/ Loos story) [10]
  • Mazher Mahmood (aka 'the fake sheikh')
  • Ulrika Jonsson
  • Rav Singh
  • Jane Atkinson
  • Neil Mcleod
  • Amanda Evans
  • Sara Nuwar
  • Carole Aye Maung
  • Ryan Sabey
  • Robert Kellaway
  • Matthew Acton
  • Phil Taylor
  • Polly Graham
  • Nadia Cohen
  • David Harrison
  • Ray Ryan
  • Antony Kastrinakis

Mazher Mahmood in the 80s Mazher Mahmood is an undercover reporter for the British newspaper News of the World. ... Image:Ulrikajohsson. ... For the Motörhead drummer, see Phil Philthy Animal Taylor. ...

See also

News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... News Limited was the principal holding for the business interests of Rupert Murdoch until the formation of News Corporation in 1979. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Junk food news refers to news stories that sensationalize, personalize or homogenize relatively inconsequential trivia in the mass media. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
New World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (296 words)
The term "New World" should not be confused with "modern world"; the latter generally refers to a historical period, not a landmass.
While America is always described as "New World", Australasia can be described as either "Old World" or "New World" depending on the sphere of discourse, especially in the case of New Zealand where the first human settlers arrived only a few generations before Columbus reached the Americas.
In a biological context, Australasia is neither New World nor Old, as flora and fauna differ markedly from both those of Eurasia and of the Americas.
Brave New World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4717 words)
The entire planet is united as The World State, under a peaceful world government established in the aftermath of an apocalyptic global war in the 21st century; a government which has eliminated war, poverty, crime, and unhappiness by creating a homogenous high-tech society across Earth, based on the industrial principles of Henry Ford.
She is a personification of the new society, happy and "pneumatic", conformist in her behaviour, fulfilling her function in society, which seems to be to sleep with as many men as possible, but largely incapable of free thought.
Brave New World's London propaganda centre is at Fleet Street, the traditional home of the British press, and the pseudo-religious Arch-Community Songster is based at Canterbury, where the clerical head of the modern day Church of England sits.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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