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Encyclopedia > Newport News, Virginia
Newport News, Virginia
Newport News City Center at Oyster Point
Official seal of Newport News, Virginia
Seal
Location in the State of Virginia
Location in the State of Virginia
Coordinates: 37°4′15″N 76°29′4″W / 37.07083, -76.48444
Country United States
State Virginia
County Independent city
Incorporated 1896
Government
 - Mayor Joe Frank
Area
 - City  119.1 sq mi (308.3 km²)
 - Land  68.3 sq mi (176.9 km²)
 - Water  50.8 sq mi (131.5 km²)
Elevation  15 ft (4.5 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 181,913
 - Density 1,085.3/sq mi (419.0/km²)
 - Urban 1,134,145
 - Metro 1,521,723
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: www.newport-news.va.us

Newport News is an independent city in Virginia. It is on the southwestern end of the Virginia Peninsula, on the north shore of the James River extending to its mouth at Hampton Roads. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Newport_News_Virginia_Seal. ... Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... This article contains a trivia section. ... The Commonwealth of Virginia is divided into 95 counties and 39 independent cities, which are considered county-equivalents for census puposes. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Joe Frank is the current mayor of Newport News, Virginia. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the...


The origin of the unusual name of "Newport News" is unclear. Some locals believe it gained its name as the geographic point at which "news" reached shore of Captain Christopher Newport's long delayed arrival after his ill-fated Third Supply mission in May 1610. Perhaps originally the name signaled hope that Jamestown would survive and the "Starving Time" was over. In reality, Captain Newport's arrival proved remarkable in two ways: 1) with him was colonist John Rolfe, with a new form of tobacco to try to export for the as-yet unprofitable Virginia Colony, and 2) proved to be a stop-gap for the colonists, postponing the abandonment of Jamestown long enough so that the eventual attempt to abandon Jamestown encountered the supply mission of Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, which brought a new form of leadership as well. West and Rolfe together held the keys to the Virginia Colony's survival. Christopher Newport (c. ... The Third Supply was the first truly successful wave of colonization, in the first British settlement in the Americas; Jamestown, Virginia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ... This article is about the Virginia colonist. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... Thomas West, 3rd (or 12th) Baron De La Warr (July 9, 1577 - June 7, 1618), was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and American Indian tribe called Delaware (in the United States) were named. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ...


It is more probable that the original name was "New Port Newce", named for a person with the name Newce and the town's place as a new seaport. The first English settlement on the site of Newport News which was made in 1621 in Elizabeth Cittie (sic) by planters brought from Ireland by Daniel Gookin, who selected the site on the advice of Sir William Newce and his brother Captain Thomas Newce. On the edge of Elizabeth City County, it was earliest an unincorporated town without formal boundaries in Warwick County for over 250 years. Some early maps show it as Newport News Point. Elizabeth City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... In United States law, a region of land is unincorporated if it is not a part of any municipality. ... Warwick County (shaded in orange on this 1895 map) was originally one of the eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ...


Beginning in 1881, 15 years of explosive development began under Collis P. Huntington, who built a new railroad, coal piers, and a large shipyard. In 1896, Newport News, which had been the county seat of Warwick County, became a separate city from the county. Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Aerial view looking east of Virginian Railway coal piers at Sewells Point on Hampton Roads near Norfolk, Virginia. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Fish ladder and shipyard in Grave, the Netherlands Construction hall of Schichau Seebeck Shipyard, Bremerhaven Gdynia Shipyard Shipyards and dockyards are places which repair and build ships. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ...


In 1900, 19,635 people lived in Newport News, Virginia; in 1910, 20,205; in 1920, 35,596; and in 1940, 37,067. However, the city consolidated with the former Warwick County by mutual consent in 1958, becoming Virginia's third largest in city population. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 180,150. A more recent 2006 estimate indicates the city's population has declined to 178,281 [1]. It is Virginia's fifth largest city. Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Among the city's major industries are Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, owned by Northrop Grumman[2], and the large coal piers supplied by railroad giant CSX Transportation. Miles of the waterfront can be seen by automobiles crossing the James River Bridge and Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel. Recovered artifacts from the USS Monitor are displayed at the Mariners' Museum, and American Civil War battle sites near historic Lee Hall and several plantations have been protected along the roads leading to Yorktown and Williamsburg of the Historic Triangle. The newly constructed USS Birmingham is launched from the Newport News yards in 1942 Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN), formerly called Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company (NNS&DD or simply NNS), is the largest privately owned shipyard in the United States and the only one that can build Nimitz... CSX Transportation (AAR reporting marks CSXT) is a Class I railroad in the United States, owned by the CSX Corporation. ... James River Bridge, near Hampton Roads in Virginia. ... Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel (MMMBT) is the 4. ... USS Monitor was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy. ... The Mariners Museum is located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Lee Hall is a former unincorporated town (or village) which is now a community in the extreme western portion of the independent city of Newport News in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... // This article is about crop plantations. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ...

Contents

Source of the name

The original area near the mouth of the James River was first referred to as "Newportes Newes" as early as 1621 and is purported to be the longest continuously named place in the United States. The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ...


The source of the name "Newport News" is not known with certainty. Several versions are recorded, and it is subject of popular speculation locally. Probably the best-known explanation holds that when an early group of Jamestown colonists left to return to England after the Starving Time during the winter of 1609-10 aboard a ship of Captain Christopher Newport, they encountered another fleet of supply ships under the new Governor Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr in the James River off Mulberry Island with reinforcements of men and supplies. The new governor ordered them to turn around, and return to Jamestown. Under this theory, the community was named for Newport's "good news." (It is probable that not all of those intending to depart thought returning to the harsh conditions of Jamestown was "good" news, however). Another possibility is that the community may have derived its name from an old English word "news" meaning "new town." At least one source claims that the "New" arose from the original settlement's being rebuilt after a fire. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ... Christopher Newport (c. ... Thomas West, 3rd (or 12th) Baron De La Warr (July 9, 1577 - June 7, 1618), was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and American Indian tribe called Delaware (in the United States) were named. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... Mulberry Island is located along the James River in southeastern Virginia at the confluence of the Warwick River on the Virginia Peninsula. ...


According to a 1901 article in the College of William and Mary's Quarterly Magazine, the well-documented case is made that it is more probable that the original name was "New Port Newce", named for a person with the name Newce and the town's place as a new seaport. The namesake, Sir William Newce, was originally an English soldier and settler in Ireland where he had established Newcestown near Bondon in County Cork. Newce sailed to Virginia with Sir Francis Wyatt in October, 1621 and was granted 2,500 acres of land, but died two days after. His brother, Capt. Thomas Newce, was given "600 acres at Kequatan [sic], now called Elizabeth Cittie [sic]." A partner Daniel Gookin, completed the establishment of the settlement. In the General History of Virginia edited by Captain John Smith, occurs this reference: "Nov. 22, 1621, arrived Master Gookin out of Ireland, with fifty men of his own, and thirty passengers exceedingly well furnished with all sorts of provisions and cattle, and planted himself at Newports Newes." Records following the Indian Massacre of 1622 state "Daniel Gookin successfully defended his settlement at Neport [sic] News against all attacks. [3] The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Newcestown (Baile Nuis in Irish) is a small village located 35 km from Cork city in the west of county Cork. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Cork Code: C (CK proposed) Area: 7,457 km² Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork); 361,766 (without Cork City) Website: www. ... Wyatt, Sir Francis, (* 1588 – 1644), English colonial governor of Virginia. ... Kecoughtan in Virginia was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kecoughtan and Kikowtan), presumably a word for the native americans living there when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607. ... Elizabeth City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ... John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ...


Regardless of the origin of the name, the fact it was formerly written as "Newport's News" is verified by numerous early documents and maps, and by local tradition. The change to Newport News apparently was brought about by usage, for by 1851 the Post Office Department sanctioned "New Port News" (three words as the name of the first post office, and in 1866 it approved the name as "Newport News", the current form. 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Political structure

Newport News, Hampton, Portsmouth and Norfolk, Virginia from space, July 1996 (Newport News is seen in the upper left quadrant)

Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_news_norfolk_portsmouth_rotated. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_news_norfolk_portsmouth_rotated. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...

Newport News in Elizabeth Cittie, Warwick County

During the 17th century, shortly after establishment of the Jamestown Settlement in 1607, English settlers and explored and began settling the areas adjacent to Hampton Roads. In 1610, Sir Thomas Gates took possession of a nearby Native American village which became known as Kecoughtan. Sketch of Jamestown c. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Sovereign Gates, Jr. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... Kecoughtan in Virginia was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kecoughtan and Kikowtan), presumably a word for the native americans living there when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607. ...


In 1619, the area of Newport News was included in one of four huge corporations of the Virginia Company of London, and became known as Elizabeth Cittie [sic], which extended west all the way to Skiffe's Creek (currently the border between Newport News and James City County. Elizabeth Cittie also included all of present-day South Hampton Roads. Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... Elizabeth City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... South Hampton Roads is a region located in the extreme southeastern portion of Virginia in the United States. ...


By 1634, the English colony of Virginia consisted of a total population of approximately 5,000 inhabitants and was redivided into eight shires of Virginia, which were renamed as counties shortly thereafter. The area of Newport News became part Warwick River Shire, which became Warwick County in 1637. By 1810, the county seat was at Denbigh. For a short time in the mid-19th century, the county seat was moved to Newport News. Eight Shires of Virginia were formed in 1634 in the Virginia Colony. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Warwick River Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Warwick County (shaded in orange on this 1895 map) was originally one of the eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Denbigh was a small unincorporated town in Warwick County, Virginia. ...


1896: a new city: Newport News

Newport News was merely an area of farm lands and a fishing village until the coming of the railroad and the subsequent establishment of the great shipyard. Following a huge growth spurt of railroad and shipyard development, the new "City of Newport News" was formerly organized and became independent of Warwick County in 1896 by an act of the Virginia General Assembly. It was one of only a few cities in Virginia to be newly established without earlier incorporation as a town. (Virginia has had an independent city political subdivision since 1871). Walter A. Post served as the city's first mayor. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Fish ladder and shipyard in Grave, the Netherlands Construction hall of Schichau Seebeck Shipyard, Bremerhaven Gdynia Shipyard Shipyards and dockyards are places which repair and build ships. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Walter A. Post (died February 12, 1912) was the first mayor of Newport News, Virginia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


Two Kecoughtans

Native American village, 17th century cittie

Kecoughtan, originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kiccowtan, Kikowtan as well as Kecoughtan), was a Native American village when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607. Kecoughtan in Virginia was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kecoughtan and Kikowtan), presumably a word for the native americans living there when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Languages English Religions Christianity (Anglicanism, Roman Catholicism and other minority denominations), and other faiths. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1610, the English colonists under Sir Thomas Gates, Governor, seized their land, and established their own residency there. This land was long known as part of Elizabeth Cittie (sic) and Elizabeth City County (until the county was consolidated with the City of Hampton and the incorporated town of Phoebus in 1952 to form the current independent city of Hampton) and has been continuously occupied ever since, forming the basis of a claim by the City of Hampton as the site of the oldest continually occupied English settlement in the U.S.A. [4] Sir Thomas Gates (fl. ... Elizabeth City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... An incorporated town in the United States is a town which is an incorporated municipality, that is, one with a charter received from the state, similar to a city. ... Phoebus was an incorporated town located in Elizabeth City County on the Virginia Peninsula in eastern Virginia. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ...


Town of Kecoughtan, Virginia

Not to be confused with the original native settlement, many years later, a newer incorporated town of Kecoughtan was developed in the 19th century and existed in the southern edge of Elizabeth City County bordering Newport News. It was annexed by the City of Newport News in 1927, where it currently forms much of the area now known as the city's East End neighborhood. An incorporated town in the United States is a town which is an incorporated municipality, that is, one with a charter received from the state, similar to a city. ...


Consolidation with Warwick

Independent city status guarantees protection against annexation of territory by adjacent communities. After years of resisting annexation efforts by Newport News, in 1952, Warwick County was successful in petitioning the Virginia General Assembly to become the independent City of Warwick. 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Warwick County (shaded in orange on this 1895 map) was originally one of the eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Warwick is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1952 until 1958. ...


In (1956), Claude Purdy (known as Claudus Perdius)the famous United States Marine Corps First Sergeant who was the hero of Desert Shield/Desert Storm campaign where he rescued three high ranking officers from being overran by the opposition forces; born in Richmond Virgina and raised in Newport News, valiantly came to the rescue of the high ranking officers.


In 1958, the citizenry of the cities of Warwick and Newport News voted by referendum to consolidate the two cities, choosing to assume the better-known name of Newport News, and forming the third largest city population-wise in Virginia with a 65 square mile area. The boundaries of the City of Newport News today are essentially the boundaries of the original Warwick River Shire and those of Warwick County for most of its existence, with the excption of minor border adjustments with neighbors. Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Collis P. Huntington: builder of a new railroad and a shipyard

The area which formed the present-day southern end of Newport News had long been established as an unincorporated town. However, during the period after the American Civil War, the new City of Newport News was essentially founded by Collis P. Huntington. Huntington, who was one of the builders of the country's first transcontinental railroad, became a major investor and guiding light, and helped complete the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway to the Ohio River. His agents began acquiring land in Warwick County in 1865, and in the 1880s, he oversaw extension of the C&O down the peninsula to Newport News, where the company developed the coal piers. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... A transcontinental railroad is a railway that crosses a continent, typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ... The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Aerial view looking east of Virginian Railway coal piers at Sewells Point on Hampton Roads near Norfolk, Virginia. ...


His next project was to develop Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, which became the world's largest shipyard. His famous saying is: The newly constructed USS Birmingham is launched from the Newport News yards in 1942 Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN), formerly called Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company (NNS&DD or simply NNS), is the largest privately owned shipyard in the United States and the only one that can build Nimitz...

We shall build good ships here. At a profit - if we can. At a loss - if we must. But always good ships.

The city of Huntington, West Virginia was named in honor of Collis P. Huntington, as was Huntington Avenue in Newport News. Developed after World War I, Huntington Park, near the northern terminus of the James River Bridge, is named for his nephew, Henry E. Huntington. Collis Huntington's son, Archer M. Huntington, developed the Mariners' Museum, one of the largest and finest maritime museums in the world. Huntington is a city located in the U.S. State of West Virginia along the Ohio River. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Huntington Park is a park located in Newport News, Virginia, USA. It offers a beach, two fishing piers, gardens, tennis, and museums. ... James River Bridge, near Hampton Roads in Virginia. ... Henry Edwards Huntington (February 27, 1850 - May 23, 1927) was an American railroad pioneer and art collector. ... Archer M. Huntington (1870-1955) was the son of railroad magnate, Collis P. Huntington. ... The Mariners Museum is located in Newport News, Virginia. ... A maritime museum (sometimes nautical museum) is a museum specializing in the display of objects relating to ships and travel on seas and lakes. ...


Geography

Newport News is located at 37°4′15″N, 76°29′4″W (37.071046, -76.484557)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 308.3 km² (119.1 mi²). 176.9 km² (68.3 mi²) of it is land and 131.5 km² (50.8 mi²) of it (42.64%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Newport News entered a Sister City relationship with Neyagawa, Osaka-fu, Japan in 1982. Newport News has a second sister city in Taizhou which is in the Jiangsu Province in China and possibly in the near future a relationship with Greifswald, Germany. This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... Neyagawa (寝屋川市; -shi) is a city located in Osaka, Japan. ... Taizhou (Simplified Chinese: 台州; pinyin: Tāizhōu) is a prefecture-level city in the east of Zhejiang province, China. ... Jiangsu (Simplified Chinese: 江苏; Traditional Chinese: 江蘇; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang-su; Postal System Pinyin: Kiangsu) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the east coast of the country. ... Greifswald (from German Greif, griffin, and Wald, forest) is a town in northeastern Germany. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 180,150 people, 69,686 households, and 46,341 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,018.5/km² (2,637.9/mi²). There were 74,117 housing units at an average density of 419.0/km² (1,085.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 53.50% White, 39.07% African American, 0.42% Native American, 2.33% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 2.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.22% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 69,686 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.6% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.04. For the record label, see Marriage Records. ...


The age distribution is: 27.5% under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 18.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 93.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $36,597, and the median income for a family was $42,520. Males had a median income of $31,275 versus $22,310 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,843. About 11.3% of families and 13.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Newport News is served by two airports. Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport, located in Newport News, and Norfolk International Airport, in Norfolk, both cater to passengers from Hampton Roads. The primary airport for the Virginia Peninsula is the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport. The Airport is experiencing a 4th year of record, double-digit growth, making it one of the fastest growing airports in the country. In January 2006, the airport reported having served 1,058,839 passengers. Along with this record growth, there has been increased talk of a possible Newport News-UK direct flight after UK-based Wolseley plc decided to put its North American headquarters in Newport News. Speculation further increased when the news was considered against the backdrop of the Jamestown 2007 commemorations. Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (IATA: PHF, ICAO: KPHF) is an airport located 9 mi (14 km) northwest of Newport News, Virginia, and serves the entire Hampton Roads metropolitan area along with Norfolk International Airport in Norfolk. ... Norfolk International Airport (IATA: ORF, ICAO: KORF, FAA LID: ORF) is a public airport located in Norfolk, Virginia, United States. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... Wolseley plc is a British company based in Droitwich formerly known for the manufacture of Wolseley motor cars. ... The Virginia state quarter commerates Jamestons quadricentennial. ...


Major Neighborhoods

Lee Hall is known for its one of a kind railroad depot seen here in 2006.
Lee Hall is known for its one of a kind railroad depot seen here in 2006.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1449x1078, 174 KB) Photo By William Grimes at Lee Hall, VA, in 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1449x1078, 174 KB) Photo By William Grimes at Lee Hall, VA, in 2006. ... Denbigh was a small unincorporated town in Warwick County, Virginia. ... Glendale is the name of some places in the United States of America and Canada: Glendale, Arizona Glendale, California Glendale, Colorado Glendale, Rhode Island Glendale, Wisconsin Glendale, Alberta There are also: Glenn Dale, Maryland Glen Dale, West Virginia Glendale is also the name of a neighborhood in the borough of... This is Newport News’ newest planned community—a mixed residential use development planned around an eighteen-hole golf course. ... Lee Hall is a former unincorporated town (or village) which is now a community in the extreme western portion of the independent city of Newport News in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Port Warwick is a new project located in the Oyster Point area in Newport News, Virginia. ... Riverside is a name common to a number of cities and counties. ... Warwick is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1952 until 1958. ...

Education

The main provider of primary and secondary education in the city is Newport News Public Schools. Several private schools are located in the area as well, including Hampton Roads Academy[5], Peninsula Catholic High School[6], and Denbigh Baptist Christian School[7]. Christopher Newport University is located within the city, and Hampton University, Old Dominion University, Norfolk State University and The College of William and Mary are located nearby. Newport News Public Schools (NNPS) is the public education system for residents of Newport News, Virginia. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American university located in Hampton, Virginia. ... Old Dominion University (ODU) is a public research university located in Norfolk, Virginia, U.S. It was established in 1930 as the Norfolk Division of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Norfolk State University (NSU) is a four-year, state-supported, coed, liberal arts institution, founded in 1935 as the Norfolk State Unit of Virginia Union University (VUU). ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


Transportation

See also: Newport News (Amtrak station)
Newport News is well known for the C&O coaling tower seen behind the locomotive.
Newport News is well known for the C&O coaling tower seen behind the locomotive.

Newport News has an elaborate transportation network, including interstate and state highways, bridges and a bridge-tunnel, freight and passenger railroad service, local transit bus and intercity bus service, and a commercial airport. There are miles of waterfront docks and port facilities. The Newport News (Amtrak station) is located at 9304 Warwick Boulevard in Newport News, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (858x517, 57 KB) Photo by William J. Grimes I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (858x517, 57 KB) Photo by William J. Grimes I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... This article is about the idea of state highways State Highway, and is more formally known as Route 139 State highway, and state route are terms that usually apply to numbered highways that are primarily administered and financed by a state government in countries that are divided into states. ... A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ... Aerial view of parallel trestles and one of four man-made islands which anchor tunnel portions of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel in Virginia, longest in the world A bridge-tunnel is a water crossing facility which uses a combination of bridge and tunnel structures. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... A Volvo articulated bus in contract service for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, operated by Virginia Overland Transportation, an urban-suburban bus line, in 2003 A transit bus (also known as a commuter bus) in the United States is usually operated by an urban-suburban bus line, a governmental... A Go North East bus parked in a lay-by in Tyne and Wear, England. ...


See also Transportation section of main article Hampton Roads This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the...


The future of Newport News

Newport News, known traditionally as a blue-collar industrial city, is currently undergoing dramatic changes to accommodate its growing affluence and relative significance as a major metropolitan nexus in the Hampton Roads region. The city's traditional downtown, located on the James River waterfront, is home to, almost exclusively, Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard and municipal offices. While the downtown area has generally remained the only true area of the city that offered genuine urban layout, that is changing with the introduction of a number of successful New Urbanism projects in the city such as Port Warwick, named after the fictional city in William Styron's novel, Lie Down in Darkness. Port Warwick includes housing for everyone from the retired community to off campus housing for Christopher Newport University students. Also included are several high-end restaurants and upscale shopping. Oyster Point City Center, located near Port Warwick in the thriving Oyster Point Retail/Central Business District (often cited as the busiest in Hampton Roads), has been touted as the new "downtown" because of its new geographic centrality on the Virginia Peninsula, its proximity to the retail/business nucleus of the city, etc. The Virginia Living Museum also recently completed a $22.6 million expansion plan. The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... The newly constructed USS Birmingham is launched from the Newport News yards in 1942 Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN), formerly called Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company (NNS&DD or simply NNS), is the largest privately owned shipyard in the United States and the only one that can build Nimitz... The New urbanism is an American urban design movement that arose in the early 1980s. ... Port Warwick is a new project located in the Oyster Point area in Newport News, Virginia. ... William Clark Styron, Jr. ... City Center at Oyster Point is one of the fastest-growing central business districts in the Oyster Point section of Newport News, Virginia. ...

One large and relatively new planned community is Kiln Creek. Currently under planning stages are a number of other New Urbanism projects, including "Asheton", a mega-development at the north end of the city bordering the Historic Triangle of Jamestown, Colonial Williamsburg, and Yorktown. Asheton is designed to compliment the historic attraction of the region. There are also plans to develop a light rail line on the Peninsula, largely in Newport News, as well as continue the gradual urbanization of the city to transform it from its currently suburban layout into a more cohesive, attractive, and enticing destination. It looks to be well on its way, judging from the rapid pace of infill redevelopment over the past 5-11 years. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (800x630, 168 KB)Newport News Victory Arch, 25th St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (800x630, 168 KB)Newport News Victory Arch, 25th St. ... The Newport News Victory Arch (or simply Victory Arch) is a monument erected in Newport News, Virginia, first in 1919 and then rebuilt in 1962. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... This is Newport News’ newest planned community—a mixed residential use development planned around an eighteen-hole golf course. ... The New urbanism is an American urban design movement that arose in the early 1980s. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ...

Newport News, Federal Building
Newport News, Federal Building

Downtown Newport News Victory Arch, built to commemorate the Great War, sits on the downtown waterfront in Newport News. The "Eternal Flame" which sits under the arch was casted by Womack Foundry, Inc. in the 1960's, and was hand crafted by the Foundry's founder and president, Ernest D. Womack. There are a number of landmarks and architecturally interesting buildings in the downtown area that seem to have been largely abandoned in favor of building new areas in the northwest areas of the city. It is hoped that one day more development would be put in the area to return it to its lost status as an urban nucleus in Hampton Roads. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Newport News Victory Arch (or simply Victory Arch) is a monument erected in Newport News, Virginia, first in 1919 and then rebuilt in 1962. ...


Official song

In July 1989, Newport News City Council adopted via resolution Newport News' official city song, "Newport News," written by native Ronald W. Bell. The song voices the community's links to both the nation's earliest beginnings and its longstanding maritime heritage:

NEWPORT NEWS

Harbor of a thousand ships
Forger of a nation's fleet
Gateway to the New World
Where ocean and river meet

Strength wrought from steel
And a people's fortitude
Such is the timeless legacy (chorus)
Of a place called Newport News

Nestled in a blessed land
Gifted with a special view
Forever home for ev'ry man
With a spirit proud and true

(repeat chorus)

Notable features and natives

Newport News is the location of Fort Eustis, an important U.S. Army base built in Warwick County on Mulberry Island at the mouth of the Warwick River in beginning in 1918. Fort Eustis is a military base facility of the United States military located in Newport News, Virginia. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Mulberry Island is located along the James River in southeastern Virginia at the confluence of the Warwick River on the Virginia Peninsula. ... The Warwick River is a short tidal estuary which empties into the James River a few miles from Hampton Roads at the southern end of Chesapeake Bay in southeast Virginia in the United States. ...


The city is also famous as the birthplace of legendary jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald and author William Styron. It was also the birthplace of 2 notable professional football players, Free agent quarterback Aaron Brooks, who attended Homer L. Ferguson High School, and his second cousin, Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick, who also attended Ferguson and transferred to Warwick High when Ferguson was closed. Michael Vick was honored by Warwick High School in 1999 by retiring his football jersey. Another football player, Michael's younger brother, Marcus Vick was born here. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... William Clark Styron, Jr. ... In North American professional sports, particularly baseball, football, and basketball, a free agent is a team player whose contract with a team has expired, and the player is able to sign a contract with another team. ... For the basketball player, see Aaron Brooks (basketball). ... Ferguson High School was formerly a high school in Newport News, Virginia, named for Homer L. Ferguson, president of Newport News Shipbuilding from 22 July 1915 until 31 July 1946. ... City Atlanta, Georgia Team colors Black, Red, and White Head Coach Bobby Petrino Owner Arthur Blank General manager Rich McKay Mascot Freddie Falcon League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970... Michael Dwayne Vick (born June 26, 1980 in Newport News, Virginia) is an American football quarterback for the National Football Leagues Atlanta Falcons franchise. ... Warwick High School is a high school in Newport News, Virginia. ... Marcus Deon Vick (born March 20, 1984 in Newport News, Virginia) is an American football wide receiver/quarterback who is currently a free agent. ...


Born in (1956), Claude Purdy (known as Claudus Perdius)the famous United States Marine Corps First Sergeant who was the hero of Desert Shield/Desert Storm campaign where he rescued three high ranking officers from being overran by opposing forces; received the Navy Cross, Silver Star and Bronze Star, born in Richmond Virgina and raised in Newport News, valiantly came to the rescue of the high ranking officers. Graduate of Ferguson High School 1974.


Denver Nuggets basketball player Allen Iverson is also from the lower east end of Newport News, but was born in neighboring Hampton, Virginia, where he attended Jefferson Davis Middle and Bethel High schools. For the original defunct Denver Nuggets, see Denver Nuggets (original). ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ...


Musicians Victor Wooten and his brother Roy Wooten (a.k.a. Future Man) attended Denbigh High, and started their careers at Busch Gardens in Williamsburg. Mike Tomlin head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers also attended Denbigh High School Victor Lemonte Wooten (born September 11, 1964 in Hampton, Virginia) is an American electric bass guitar player. ... Roy Wilfred Wooten (stage name Future Man; born October 13, 1957) is a drummer and member of the jazz quartet Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. ... Busch Gardens is the name of two amusement parks in the United States owned and operated by Busch Entertainment Corporation, a division of Anheuser-Busch. ... Mike Tomlin (born March 15, 1972 in Hampton, Virginia), is the head coach of the National Football Leagues Pittsburgh Steelers. ... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... Denbigh High School may refer to: Denbigh High School in Luton, Bedfordshire, England, which was the subject of a law suit over a students Islamic dress Denbigh High School (Newport News, Virginia) in Newport News, Virginia, USA Denbigh High School in Denbigh, Denbighshire, Wales Categories: | ...


Actress, Pearl Bailey was also raised in Newport News, but was born in Southampton County, Virginia. Another jazz and cabaret singer from Newport News is Joan Shaw, now known as Salena Jones. Christopher Newport University honors this heritage with the annual Ella Fitzgerald Jazz Festival held at their I.M. Pei-designed Ferguson Center for the Performing Arts. Pearl Bailey in “St. ... Southampton County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ... Salena Jones (born Joan Elizabeth Shaw in Newport News, Virginia) is an American jazz and cabaret singer now based in London, England. ... Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... The Ferguson Center for the Arts is a new theater and concert hall on the campus of Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia, USA. It fully opened in September of 2005. ...


The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Christopher Newport University are located in Newport News. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), commonly called Jefferson Lab (JLAB), is a U.S. national laboratory operated by Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) for the U.S. Department of Energy. ... Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ...


Underground Hip Hop artist Tonedeff was born in Newport News. Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Trivia

  • In modern times, the city is also sometimes locally known by the nickname "Bad Newz," especially the East End "inner-city" area. Rapper 50 Cent incorporated this nickname into his song "Ski Mask Way." Causing some local scandal and outrage amongst city leaders, he explained to the DJ of local radio station WOWI (102.9 FM), that he was 'rapping from the perspective of a stick-up kid seeking new territory.'[1]
  • In 1976, the city was one of the first cities to pick up the TBS cable network.

Michael Dwayne Vick (born June 26, 1980 in Newport News, Virginia) is an American football quarterback for the National Football Leagues Atlanta Falcons franchise. ... Marcus Deon Vick (born March 20, 1984 in Newport News, Virginia) is an American football wide receiver/quarterback who is currently a free agent. ... For the basketball player, see Aaron Brooks (basketball). ... Henry Wendell Jordan (January 26, 1935 - February 21, 1977) was a former American football defensive tackle who played for two teams, the Green Bay Packers and the Cleveland Browns during his thirteen year National Football League career from 1957 to 1969. ... David Macklin (born July 14, 1978 in Newport News, VA) is a National Football League cornerback for the Arizona Cardinals. ... Al Toon is a former American Football wide receiver who played his entire career with the New York Jets of the NFL. Categories: Sports stubs | National Football League players ... Darryl Blackstock (born May 30, 1983) is an American football player who currently plays for the Arizona Cardinals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Don Ferquan (better known simply as Quan) is an upcoming rapper currently signed to Nass Ill Will Records. ... For the currency amount, see 50 cents. ... WOWI, known on the air as 103 Jamz, is a radio station in Hampton Roads, Virginia. ... The Los Angeles-class attack submarines (SSN) are the most numerous class of nuclear powered submarines built by any nation, and form the bulk of the U.S. attack submarine force as of 2007. ... USS Newport News (SSN-750), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Newport News, Virginia. ... TBS also stands for Tokyo Broadcasting System, a Japanese television network. ...

See also

The Newport News Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism (also known as Newport News Parks) is the government agency responsible for maintaining city parks and other sites of interest to tourists and the general population within the city of Newport News, Virginia. ... This is a list of famous people and celebrities that were either born in or have lived in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia. ... This is a list of people who have served as mayor of the city of Newport News, Virginia. ... Lee Hall is a former unincorporated town (or village) which is now a community in the extreme western portion of the independent city of Newport News in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Warwick County (shaded in orange on this 1895 map) was originally one of the eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ...

External links

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Newport News, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2312 words)
It is on the southeastern end of the Virginia Peninsula, on the north shore of the James River extending to its mouth at Hampton Roads.
Newport News was originally an unincorporated town located in the southeastern portion of Warwick River Shire, one of eight created in colonial Virginia in 1634.
Newport News is the location of Fort Eustis, an important U.S. Army base built in Warwick County on Mulberry Island at the mouth of the Warwick River in beginning in 1918.
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