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Encyclopedia > Newport, Rhode Island
Newport, Rhode Island
Nickname: City by the Sea, Queen of Summer Resorts , America's Society Capital
Location in Rhode Island
Coordinates: 41°29′17″N 71°18′45″W / 41.48806, -71.3125
Country United States
State Rhode Island
County Newport
Government
 - Mayor Stephen Waluk
Area
 - City  11.5 sq mi (29.7 km²)
 - Land  7.9 sq mi (20.6 km²)
 - Water  3.5 sq mi (9.2 km²)
Elevation  30 ft (9 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 26,475
 - Density 8,641/sq mi (3,336.3/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 02840-02841
Area code(s) 401
FIPS code 44-49960GR2
GNIS feature ID 1217986GR3
Website: http://www.cityofnewport.com
Newport, Rhode Island
Newport, Rhode Island

Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. Known as a New England summer resort and for the famous Newport Mansions, it is the home of Naval Station Newport, housing the United States Naval War College, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, and a major United States Navy training center. The city is the seat of Newport County. Newport is also renown for being the "Summer White House" during the administration of President John F. Kennedy. // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Image File history File links Newport. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. State. ... List of Rhode Island counties: Rhode Island Bristol County: formed in 1747 from land gained from Bristol County, Massachusetts after resolution of a boundary dispute between the two colonies. ... Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... Area code 401 is the telephone area code serving all of the state of Rhode Island. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... The Naval Station Newport is a United States Navy base located in the towns of Newport and Middletown, Rhode Island. ... The Naval War College. ... The Naval Undersea Warfare Center, located in Newport, Rhode Island, is home to approximately 3,000 naval engineers working on various aspects of submarine warfare. ... USN redirects here. ...

Coast along Newport
Coast along Newport

Contents

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

History

Newport was founded in 1639 by Nicholas Easton, William Coddington, John Clarke, and others, who left Portsmouth, Rhode Island after a political fallout with Anne Hutchinson and her followers. Newport soon grew to become the most important port in colonial Rhode Island. A public school was established in 1640. In the mid 1600s, a group of Jews fleeing the inquisition in Spain and Portugal were allowed to settle in Newport. The Newport congregation is the second oldest Jewish congregation in the United States and meets in the oldest synagogue in the western hemisphere, Touro Synagogue. At the same time, a large number of Quakers settled in Newport. The evidence of this population can be seen today in the fact that many streets in the oldest part of town known as the "The Point", are named after trees. The Quaker meetinghouse in Newport (1699) is the oldest house of worship in Rhode Island. At the same time, a large population of Baptists settled in Newport. In 1727, James Franklin (brother of Benjamin) was printing in Newport; in 1732, he published the first newspaper, the Rhode Island Gazette. In 1758, his son James founded the Mercury, a weekly paper. Throughout the 18th century the famous Goddard and Townsend furniture was made in Newport. For the physicist (winner of 2004 Hughes Medal) see John Clarke (physicist) John Clarke (1609–1676) was a medical doctor, Baptist minister, co-founder of the colony of Rhode Island, and a leading advocate of religious freedom in the Americas. ... Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Anne Hutchinson on Trial by Edwin Austin Abbey Anne Hutchinson (July, 1591 – July, 1643) was the unauthorized Puritan preacher of a dissident church discussion group and a pioneer settler in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Netherlands. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Exterior of the Touro Synagogue The Touro Synagogue is a synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island that is the oldest Jewish synagogue still in use in North America and the only surviving synagogue in the U.S. dating to the colonial era. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Goddard and Townsend (or Townsend-Goddard) is a rare style of furniture made in Newport, Rhode Island in the 18th century. ...


Throughout the eighteenth century, Newport suffered from an imbalance of trade with the largest colonial ports. As a result, Newport merchants were forced to develop alternatives to conventional exports.[1]


Newport was also a major center of pirate activity during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. So many pirates used Newport as their base of operations that the London Board of Trade made an official complaint to the English government. The most famous pirate who made Newport his base was Thomas Tew. Tew was very popular with the locals, after one of his pirating voyages, it was reported that almost the whole town came out to greet him. Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... The flag of Thomas Tew Thomas Tew aka the Rhode Island Pirate. ...


In the 1720s, colonial leaders, acting under pressure from the English government, arrested many pirates. Many were hanged in Newport and were buried on Goat Island. Hanging is the suspension of a person by a ligature, usually a cord wrapped around the neck, causing death. ...


During the colonial period, Newport was the center of the slave trade in New England. Many of the great fortunes made during this period were made in the slave trade. The Old Brick Market in Newport was the scene of many slave auctions. The Common Burial Ground on Farewell Street was where most of the slaves were buried. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

A view of Mary Street, looking east from Thames Street in Newport, Rhode Island, showing the historic buildings near the waterfront. The Inntowne Inn is now the Americas Cup Inn.
A view of Mary Street, looking east from Thames Street in Newport, Rhode Island, showing the historic buildings near the waterfront. The Inntowne Inn is now the Americas Cup Inn.

During the American Revolution, Newport was the scene of much activity. One of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, William Ellery, came from Newport. He later served on the Naval Committee. In the winter of 1775 and 1776, the Rhode Island legislature put militia General William West in charge of rooting out loyalists in Newport, and several notable individuals such as Joseph Wanton and Thomas Vernon were exiled to the northern part of the state.[1] ] In the fall of 1776, the British, seeing that Newport could be used as a naval base to attack New York (which they had recently occupied) took over the city. Because most of the population was pro independence, the British allowed them to leave. The city was repopulated with loyalists and British soldiers. For the next three years, the whole of the Narragansett Bay area became one large battlefield, with Newport being a British fortress. Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_Rhode_Island_USA.jpg‎ Newport, Rhode Island © 2004 Matthew Trump From : http://en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_Rhode_Island_USA.jpg‎ Newport, Rhode Island © 2004 Matthew Trump From : http://en. ... Change of the declaration of of Indepenance also proves that wikipedia can be altered by anybody and could win Pancholia a free dinner. ... William Ellery William Ellery (December 22, 1727–February 15, 1820), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Rhode Island. ... William West (ca. ... For the township in Canada, see Loyalist, Ontario In general, a loyalist is an individual who is loyal to the powers that be. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the summer of 1778, the Americans began the campaign known as the Battle of Rhode Island. This was the first joint operation between the Americans and the French after the signing of the treaty of alliance. The Americans based in Tiverton, planned a formal siege of the town. However, the French (wanting a frontal assault) refused to take part in the siege. This weakened the American position and the British were able to expel the Americans from the island. The following year, the British, wanting to concentrate their forces in New York, abandoned Newport. Combatants British United States Commanders Robert Pigot John Sullivan Strength 7,139 10,100 Casualties at least 260 at least 211 The Battle of Rhode Island was a battle fought on August 29, 1778 when units of the Continental Army under the command of John Sullivan attempted to recapture Aquidneck... This is for the town, for the census designated place, see Tiverton (CDP), Rhode Island Tiverton is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


In 1780, the French under Rochambeau landed in Newport and for the rest of the war Newport was the base of the French forces in the United States. The first Catholic mass in Rhode Island was said in Newport during this time. Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (July 1, 1725 – May 10, 1807) was a French aristocrat, soldier, and a Marshal of France. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


By the time the war ended (1783) Newport's population had fallen from over 9,000 (according to the census of 1774) to less than 4,000. Over 200 abandoned buildings were torn down in the 1780s. Also, the war destroyed Newport's economic wealth, as years of military occupation closed the city to any form of trade. The Newport merchants moved away, some to Providence, others to Boston and New York. Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


It was in Newport in 1791 that the Rhode Island General Assembly, acting under pressure from the merchant community of Providence, voted to ratify the Constitution and become the 13th state. The Rhode Island General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ...


The city is the site of the last residence of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the birthplace of Commodore Matthew C. Perry and the Reverend William Ellery Channing. Oliver Hazard Perry Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (August 23, 1785 – August 23, 1819) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dr. William Ellery Channing (April 7, 1780 – October 2, 1842) was the foremost Unitarian preacher in the United States in the early nineteenth century and, along with Andrews Norton, one of Unitarianisms leading theologians. ...

Newport's City Hall
Newport's City Hall

Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, wealthy southern planters seeking to escape the heat began to build summer cottages on Bellevue Avenue such as Kingscote (1839).[2] Eventually wealthy Yankees such as the Wetmore family also began constructing larger mansions such as Chateau-sur-Mer (1852) nearby.[3] Most of these early families made a substantial part of their fortunes in the Old China Trade.[4] They were followed by the richest families in the country, such as the Vanderbilts and Astors who constructed the largest "cottages", such as The Breakers (1895) in the late nineteenth century.[5] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 504 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 504 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island. ... An example of Chinese export porcelain. ... This article details the family of Cornelius Vanderbilt. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ...

Chateau-sur-Mer
Chateau-sur-Mer

In the mid 19th century, a large number of Irish immigrants settled in Newport. The Fifth Ward of Newport (in the southern part of the city) became a staunch Irish neighborhood for many generations. To this day, St. Patrick's Day is an important day of pride and celebration in Newport, with a large parade going down Thames Street. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2596 KB) Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2596 KB) Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island. ...


The oldest Catholic parish in Rhode Island, St. Mary's is located on Spring Street, though the current building is not the original one.


Until 1900, Newport was one of two capitals of Rhode Island, the other being Providence. The state legislature would alternate its sessions between the two cities. Connecticut was the only other state to have more than one capital at one time. Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the...

John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier were married in St. Mary's Church in Newport on September 12, 1953. [6] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1867x870, 163 KB) Photo of The Breakers from the rear, Newport, Rhode Island, taken August 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1867x870, 163 KB) Photo of The Breakers from the rear, Newport, Rhode Island, taken August 2006. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ... August 2006 is the eighth month of that year, and has yet to occur. ... JFK redirects here. ... “Jacqueline Bouvier” redirects here. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Presidents Kennedy and Eisenhower both made Newport the sites of their "Summer White Houses" during their years in office. Eisenhower stayed at Fort Adams, while Kennedy used Hammersmith Farm. JFK redirects here. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... A Summer White House is typically the name given to the regular vacation residence of the standing President of the United States aside from Camp David. ... Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island was established on July 4th, 1799 as a First System coastal fortification. ...


In the 20th century, immigrants from Portugal and the Caribbean began settling in Newport, adding to the rich diversity of the city. “West Indian” redirects here. ...

In 1900, 22,204 people lived in Newport, Rhode Island; in 1910, 27,149; in 1920, 30,255; and in 1940, 30,532. The city has long been entwined with the U.S. Navy. Until 1971, it hosted the Cruiser-Destroyer Force of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, and subsequently it has from time to time hosted smaller numbers of warships. It held the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy during the Civil War, when the undergraduate officer training school was temporarily moved north from Annapolis, Maryland. It remains home to the U.S. Naval War College and the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC), the center of Surface Warfare Officer training, and a large division of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (867x227, 148 KB) Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (867x227, 148 KB) Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Naval War College. ... USN redirects here. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlantic Fleet (USLANTFLT) of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in around the Atlantic Ocean. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... “Annapolis” redirects here. ... The Naval War College. ... A line officer (or otherwise termed officer of the line) is a military officer who is trained to command a warship, ground combat unit, or combat aviation unit. ...


Cliff Walk

Newport Cliff Walk

The famous Newport Cliff Walk[7] extends over 3 1/2 miles on the western side of Aquidneck Island in Newport, Rhode Island. The Newport Cliff Walk is one of the great tourist attractions in Southern New England. Sweeping blue vistas of the Atlantic Ocean lie down below the cliffs while 19th Century Gilded Age mansions loom to the east. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 429 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Newport Cliff Walk, Newport, Rhode Island; taken by Jeanpaul Ferro August 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 429 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Newport Cliff Walk, Newport, Rhode Island; taken by Jeanpaul Ferro August 2007. ...


Newport Mansions

The Breaker's Mansion
The Breaker's Mansion

Newport, Rhode Island is home of some of the greatest mansions of the Gilded Age. The Breakers, The Elms, Rosecliff, Marble House, and Belcourt Castle sit along Bellevue Avenue, where American's wealthest families once resided in their "Summer Cottages." Now the Newport Mansions are historical museums where guided tours run daily. The Breaker's Mansion is the number one tourist attraction in Rhode Island with over 300,000 visitors a year. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


Geography

Newport as seen from the International Space Station.
Newport as seen from the International Space Station.

Newport is located at 41°29′17″N, 71°18′45″W. It is the largest city on Aquidneck Island in Narragansett Bay. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.7 km² (11.5 mi²). 20.6 km² (7.9 mi²) of it is land and 9.2 km² (3.5 mi²) of it (30.86%) is water. The Newport Bridge, the longest suspension bridge in New England, connects Newport to neighboring Conanicut Island across the East Passage of the Narragansett Bay. Image File history File links NewportRI_ISS012-E-19051_annotated. ... Image File history File links NewportRI_ISS012-E-19051_annotated. ... “ISS” redirects here. ... Aquidneck Island highlighted in red Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, is the largest island in Narragansett Bay. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... The Claiborne Pell (Newport) Bridge. ... Conanicut Island Conanicut Island is the second largest island in Narragansett Bay, in the state of Rhode Island. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 26,475 people, 11,566 households, and 5,644 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,287.4/km² (3,336.3/mi²). There were 13,226 housing units at an average density of 643.1/km² (1,666.7/mi²). Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ...


The racial makeup of the city was 84.12% White, 7.75% African American, 0.85% Native American, 1.33% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 2.41% from other races, and 3.44% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.54% of the population. The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 11,566 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.3% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.2% were non-families. 39.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.86. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 14.6% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $40,669, and the median income for a family was $54,116. Males had a median income of $37,780 versus $27,492 for females. The per capita income for the city was $25,441. About 12.9% of families and 14.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.8% of those under age 18 and 8.3% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Culture

Newport's Shoreline includes the mansions of many famous people from the past and present

Newport has one of the highest concentrations of colonial homes in the nation. Many of these homes were restored in the late 20th century through grants made by Newport resident Doris Duke, as well as other local efforts such as Operation Clapboard. As a result, Newport's colonial heritage is well-preserved. In addition, the city is known for its Gilded Age mansions, which have also received extensive restoration from both private owners and non-profits such as the Preservation Society of Newport County. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (955x765, 192 KB) Summary Made by Kyle Anderson Newport mansions, seashore Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (955x765, 192 KB) Summary Made by Kyle Anderson Newport mansions, seashore Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This entry lists notable people who were born, resided or worked in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... // The Elms is a large mansion, or summer cottage, located at 367 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Doris Duke (November 22, 1912 – October 28, 1993) was an American heiress and philanthropist. ... The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The largest of the Preservation Societys mansions, The Breakers. ...

Bellevue Avenue's Belcourt Castle is owned by the Tinney Family.
Bellevue Avenue's Belcourt Castle is owned by the Tinney Family.

Newport is the home of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, where important tennis players are commemorated, as well as a number of mansions dating back to the Gilded Age, including The Breakers, Belcourt Castle, Chateau-sur-Mer, The Elms, Marble House, Rosecliff, Rough Point, and the William Watts Sherman House. Some of these are open for guided tours. The nearby Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum has a fine collection of trees and plants, including the largest sequoia on the East Coast. I took this image on my 16th Birthday in Newport, RI... I can be used on the site. ... I took this image on my 16th Birthday in Newport, RI... I can be used on the site. ... Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit tennis hall of fame and museum at the Newport Casino in Newport, Rhode Island, USA. // The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit institution dedicated to preserving the history of tennis, inspiring and encouraging junior tennis development, enshrining... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ... Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Chateau-sur-Mer, Newport, Rhode Island. ... // The Elms is a large mansion, or summer cottage, located at 367 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Rosecliff is one of the fabled Gilded Age mansions of Newport, Rhode Island. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... William Watts Sherman House, west facade East facade Library The William Watts Sherman House is a notable house designed by American architect H. H. Richardson with interiors by Stanford White. ... Water Garden, Blithewold Mansion. ...


With coastlines on the west, south and east, Newport is a maritime city. Its harbors teem with commercial fishing boats, power and sail pleasure craft. It is known as the sailing capitol of the United States. Many defenses by the New York Yacht Club of the America's Cup yachting prize took place here. Newport Country Club was one of the five founding clubs of the United States Golf Association; it hosted the first U.S. Open and the first US Amateur, both held in 1895. The Newport Country Club hosted the 1996 US Amateur Open, made notable by Tiger Woods' third consecutive win of said Open and concurrent entrance to the PGA. In June 2006, the city hosted the U.S. Women's Open. In June it also hosts the annual Campbell's Hall of Fame Championships tennis tournament as part of the ATP Tour. Salmon for sale at a marketplace The Fishing industry is the commercial activity of fishing and producing fish and other seafood products. ... The New York Yacht Club is a private yacht club based in New York City and Newport, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the yachting competition. ... Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... Newport Country Club is a prestigious private golf club in Newport, Rhode Island in the United States. ... The logo of the USGA The United States Golf Association (USGA) is the United States national association of golf courses, clubs and facilities and the governing body of golf for the U.S. and Mexico. ... The United States Open Championship is the annual open golf tournament of the United States. ... ... Newport Country Club is a prestigious private golf club in Newport, Rhode Island in the United States. ... The Campbells Hall of Fame Championships is an international tennis tournament that has been held every year annually since 1976 at the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) was formed in 1972 to protect the interests of male professional Tennis players. ...

In 2001, Newport became the new home of the Newport Gulls baseball team of the NECBL. The city hosted the 2005 NECBL All-Star Game at Cardines Field, which, originally built in 1908, is one of the oldest active baseball parks in the country. The Gulls, the historic Sunset League, and other teams attract thousands of fans to Cardines weekly throughout the summer. Directly up West Marlborough Street from the ballpark is the White Horse Tavern, built prior to 1673, and considered to be one of the oldest surviving taverns in the United States.[8] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 3210 KB) Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 3210 KB) Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Newport Gulls Baseball Club is a member of the New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL), a 12-team amateur summer baseball league. ... This article is about the sport. ... The New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL) is a 12-team amateur summer baseball league founded in 1993 and sanctioned by the NCAA and Major League Baseball. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The George Donnelly Sunset League plays its games at Cardines Field in Newport, Rhode Island. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Newport is also home to the Newport Tower, Salve Regina University, Hammersmith Farm, Prescott Farm, and the Touro Synagogue, the oldest Jewish house of worship in the United States, as well as Redwood Library and Athenaeum, the nation's oldest lending library. George Washington had given a speech at the Touro Synagogue extolling the virtues of freedom of worship and that the Jews were allowed to live and worship freely in the United States. This speech has often been referenced by American Jews to show graitude and admiration for living in the United States. The Newport Tower The Newport Tower is a round stone tower located in Touro Park in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Ochre Court, Salves administrative building Salve Regina University is a university in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Hammersmith Farm is located in Newport, Rhode Island and was the childhood home to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. ... Prescott Farm is a historic preservation of a colonial farm in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Exterior of the Touro Synagogue The Touro Synagogue is a synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island that is the oldest Jewish synagogue still in use in North America and the only surviving synagogue in the U.S. dating to the colonial era. ... The Redwood Library and Athenaeum, is a private, subscription library in Newport, Rhode Island. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Newport plays host to a number of festivals during the summer months, including the Newport Jazz Festival, the Sunset Music Festival, the Newport Folk Festival (where Bob Dylan shocked the crowd by playing an electric guitar), the Newport International Film Festival, and the Newport International Boat Show. The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


Outdoor Activities

View of Easton Bay from Newport's Cliff Walk
View of Easton Bay from Newport's Cliff Walk

Aquidneck Island is home to many beautiful beaches, most public and a few private. In Newport, the largest public beach, Easton's beach or First Beach, has a view of the famed Cliff Walk. Second Beach, in neighboring Middletown, is a fantastic beach for waves, with a surfer's beach abutting. Gooseberry Beach, located on Ocean Drive, is a good family beach. There are two private beaches, both highly exclusive in Newport, Bailey's Beach (Spouting Rock Beach Association) and Hazard's Beach, both located on Ocean Drive. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1296 × 976 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View from Cliff Walk, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1296 × 976 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View from Cliff Walk, Newport, Rhode Island. ...


Brenton Point State Park is also an excellent spot for the family, with exquisite vistas, and is home to the annual Brenton Point Kite Festival.


Fort Adams, an historical fort dating back to the War of 1812 houses the Museum of Yachting and hosts the Newport Folk Festival annually. It too has spectacular views of Narragansett Bay, and is a perfect location for family picnics. Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island was established on July 4th, 1799 as a First System coastal fortification. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ...


Since Newport has a strong maritime heritage, water based recreation is a primary attraction. Options include sailing, sea kayaking, and windsurfing. For many years Newport was home to the series of yacht races for the America's Cup. One can charter 12-Meter yachts that have raced in the America's Cup for a pleasure cruise on Narragansett Bay. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article is about the yachting competition. ...


Schools

  • Elementary Schools: Carey School, Coggeshall School, Cranston-Calvert School, Sheffield School, Sullivan School, Underwood School, St Michael's Country Day School, St. Joseph of Cluny Sisters' School.
  • Secondary Schools: St. George's School, Thompson Middle School, Rogers High School, Newport Area Career and Technical Center, Aquidneck Island Adult Learning Center.
  • Post Secondary Schools: U.S. Naval Academy Prep School, Salve Regina University, Naval War College, International Yacht Restoration School, Community College of Rhode Island Newport Campus.

St Georges School or Saint Georges School may refer to: // St. ... Rogers High School is the only high school in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Ochre Court, Salves administrative building Salve Regina University is a university in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The Naval War College. ... // From its modest beginning with 325 students in 1964, to its present enrollment of more than 16,000 students, Community College of Rhode Island has grown to meet the goals of its founders. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Cities in Shizuoka Prefecture ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Azores. ... This article is about a city in Sao Miguel Island, Azores. ... Motto (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,333 km² (n/a) 911 sq mi... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Imperia is a city and comune in the region of Liguria, Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Skiathos (Greek: Σκιάθος), Latin forms: Sciathos and Sciathus is a city and a small island in the Aegean Sea belonging to Greece. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Saint John[3] is the largest city in the province of New Brunswick and the oldest incorporated city in Canada. ...

Notable people

Main article: Notable people of Newport, Rhode Island

This entry lists notable people who were born, resided or worked in Newport, Rhode Island. ...

References

  1. ^ Tunnell, Daniel L.; Hechtlinger, Adelaide (April 1975). "Life in Newport Part II: The Eighteenth Century". Early American Life: 26-31. 

Further reading

  • S. G. Arnold, History of the State of Rhode Island, (two volumes, New York, (1859-60)
  • G. W. Mason, Reminiscences of Rhode Island, (Newport, 1884)
  • E. M. Stone, Our French Allies, (Providence, 1884)
  • Newport History, the journal of the Newport Historical Society
  • C.P.B. Jefferys, Newport: A Short History (1992)

See also

  • Buildings and structures in Newport, Rhode Island

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Naval Training Station of Newport, Rhode Island
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Newport, Rhode Island

Coordinates: 41.488002° N 71.312622° W Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Newport, Rhode Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1281 words)
Newport was founded in 1639 by William Coddington, John Clarke, and others, who left Boston on account of their sympathy with the Antinomians.
Newport is the home of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, where important tennis players are commemorated, as well as a number of mansions dating back to the Gilded Age, including The Breakers, Belcourt Castle, the Carey Mansion, Chateau-sur-Mer, Rosecliff, Marble House and The Elms.
Newport is also home to the Newport Tower, Salve Regina University, Hammersmith Farm and the Touro Synagogue, the oldest Jewish house of worship in the United States, as well as Redwood Library and Anthanaeum, the nation's oldest lending library.
Newport County, Rhode Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (535 words)
Newport County is one of five counties located in the U.S. state of Rhode Island.
As of 2000, the population of Newport County was 85,433.
Newport County is also one of the seven regions of Rhode Island.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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