FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Newgate Prison
Newgate, the old city gate and prison.
Newgate, the old city gate and prison.
The second Newgate in a 19th-century print: A West View of Newgate by George Shepherd.
The second Newgate in a 19th-century print: A West View of Newgate by George Shepherd.
A plan of Newgate Prison published in 1800.
A plan of Newgate Prison published in 1800.
A cell and the galleries at Newgate in 1896.
A cell and the galleries at Newgate in 1896.

Newgate Prison was a prison in London, at the corner of Newgate Street and Old Bailey just inside the City of London. It was originally located at the site of a gate in the Roman London Wall. The gate/prison was rebuilt in the 12th century, and demolished 1767. The prison was extended and rebuilt many times, and remained in use for over 700 years, from 1188 to 1902. Download high resolution version (571x679, 115 KB)Old Newgate Prison, which was replaced in the 18th century. ... Download high resolution version (571x679, 115 KB)Old Newgate Prison, which was replaced in the 18th century. ... The second Newgate in a 19th century print: A West View of Newgate by George Shepherd. ... The second Newgate in a 19th century print: A West View of Newgate by George Shepherd. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Newgate_-_cell_and_galleries_from_The_Queen's_London_-_a_Pictorial_and_Descriptive_Record_of_the_Streets,_Buildings,_Parks_and_Scenery_of_the_Great_Metropolis,_1896. ... Image File history File links Newgate_-_cell_and_galleries_from_The_Queen's_London_-_a_Pictorial_and_Descriptive_Record_of_the_Streets,_Buildings,_Parks_and_Scenery_of_the_Great_Metropolis,_1896. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Old Bailey. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ...


The first prison at Newgate was built in 1188 on the orders of Henry II. It was significantly enlarged in 1236, and the executors of Lord Mayor Richard Whittington were granted a license to renovate the prison in 1422. The prison was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and was rebuilt in 1672, extending into new buildings on the south side of the street. Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... An executor is a person named by a maker of a will to carry out the directions of the will. ... Michael Berry Savory is the current Lord Mayor of London. ... Sir Richard Whittington and his Cat Richard Whittington (c1350 — 1423), medieval merchant and politician, was the real-life inspiration for the pantomime character, Dick Whittington. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ...


It was used for a number of purposes including imprisoning people awaiting execution, although it was not always secure: burglar Jack Sheppard escaped from the prison three times before he went to the gallows at Tyburn in 1724. Burglary is a crime related to United States burglary is a felony and involves trespassing, or entering a building with intent to commit any crime, not necessarily a felony or theft. ... Jack Sheppard in Newgate Prison Jack Sheppard (December 1702 – 16 November 1724) was a notorious English robber, burglar and thief of early 18th century London. ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... Tyburn was a former village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch. ...


The old prison was demolished and replaced by a new building designed by George Dance between 1770 and 1778. He also designed the adjacent court-house. The new prison was attacked by rioting mobs during the Gordon Riots in 1780: the prison was set on fire, many prisoners died during the blaze and approximately 300 escaped to temporary freedom. George Dance the Younger (1741 - 14 January 1825) was a British architect and surveyor. ... The Gordon Riots is a term used to refer to a number of events in a predominantly Protestant religious uprising in London aimed against the Roman Catholic Relief Act, 1778, relieving his Majestys subjects, of the Catholic Religion, from certain penalties and disabilities imposed upon them during the reign...


The prison was rebuilt two years later (in 1782), to an Architecture Terrible design intended to discourage law-breaking. The building was laid out around a central courtyard, and was divided into two sections: a 'Common' area for poor prisoners and a 'State area' for those able to afford more comfortable accommodation. Each section was further sub-divided to accommodate felons and debtors.


In 1783, the site of London's gallows was moved from Tyburn to Newgate. Public executions outside the prison - by this time, London's main prison - continued to draw large crowds. It was also possible to visit the prison by obtaining a permit from the Lord Mayor of the City of London or a sheriff. The condemned were kept in narrow sombre cells separated from Newgate Street by a thick wall and receiving only a dim light from the inner courtyard. The gallows were constructed outside a window in Newgate Street. Michael Berry Savory is the current Lord Mayor of London. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Newgate was a gate in the west of London Wall round the City of London. ...


During the early 19th century, the prison also attracted the attention of the social reformer Elizabeth Fry. She was particularly concerned at the conditions in which women prisoners (and their children) were held. After she presented evidence to the House of Commons, improvements were made. In 1858, the interior was rebuilt with individual cells. Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Fry (née Gurney; 21 May 1780 – 12 October 1845) was an English prison reformer, social reformer and, as a Quaker, a Christian philanthropist. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


From 1868, public executions were discontinued and executions were carried out on a gallows inside Newgate. Michael Barrett was the last man to be hanged in public outside Newgate Prison (and the last person to be executed in public in Great Britain) on 26 May 1868. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The prison closed in 1902 and was demolished in 1904. The Central Criminal Court (also known as the Old Bailey after the street on which it stands) now stands upon its site. Categories: Stub | Legal buildings in London | Local government buildings in London | Legal London ... The Old Bailey. ...


The original door from a prison cell used to house St. Oliver Plunkett in 1681 survives today and is on display at St. Peter's Church in Drogheda, Ireland. The original iron gate leading to the gallows was used for decades in an alleyway in Buffalo, New York and is currently housed in that city at Canisius College. This article or section should include material from Oliver Plunket Saint Oliver Plunkett Saint Oliver Plunkett (September 30, 1629 - July 1, 1681) is an Irish saint. ... St. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O088754 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 1 m Population (2006)  - Proper  - Environs    28,973[1]  6,117[1] Website: www. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ...


Famous prisoners

Other famous prisoners at Newgate include:

William Cobbett, portrait in oils possibly by George Cooke around 1831. ... Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... For other uses, see Robinson Crusoe (disambiguation). ... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... For other persons of the same name, see Ben Johnson (disambiguation). ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... In English law, the benefit of clergy was originally a provision by which clergymen could claim that they were outside the jurisdiction of the secular courts and be tried instead under canon law. ... For the musician, orchestrator, and composer, see William Kidd (composer). ... Jean Law John Law (bap. ... Sir Thomas Malory (c. ... The Last Sleep of Arthur by Edward Burne-Jones Le Morte dArthur (spelled Le Morte Darthur in the first printing and also in some modern editions, Middle French for la mort dArthur, the death of Arthur) is Sir Thomas Malorys compilation of some French and English Arthurian... Titus Oates. ... For other uses, see William Penn (disambiguation). ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Owen Suffolk Owen Suffolk (4 April 1829 – ? ) an Australian bushranger, poet, confidence-man and author of Days of Crime and Years of Suffering (1867). ... Captain James MacLaine (occasionally Maclean, MacLean, or Maclane) (1724 – 3 October 1750) was a notorious highwayman with his accomplice William Plunkett. ...

In literature

Image of child-murderer Thomas Hunter from the Newgate Calendar. ... The Newgate novels (or Old Bailey novels) were novels published in England from the late 1820s until the 1840s that were thought to glamorise the lives of the criminals they portrayed. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... For other uses, see A Tale of Two Cities (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Great Expectations (disambiguation). ... Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces published by Charles Dickens in 1836. ... Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... Caleb Thomas Williams is a well-known American gonzo journalist based out of San Antonio. ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... The Great Train Robbery is a bestselling 1975 historical fiction novel written by Michael Crichton. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... The Baroque Cycle is a series of books written by Neal Stephenson and published in 2003 and 2004. ... Joseph Victor OConnor (born September 20, 1963) is an Irish novelist and brother of singer Sinéad OConnor. ... Star of the Sea is a historical novel by the Irish writer Joseph OConnor published in 2003. ... Bernard Cornwell OBE (born February 23, 1944) is a prolific and popular English historical novelist. ... Gallows Thief is a 2003 mystery novel by Bernard Cornwell, which uses capital punishment as its backdrop. ... David Liss (b. ... A Conspiracy of Paper is a novel by David Liss set in 18th century London. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°30′56.49″N, 0°06′06.91″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - h2g2 - Life Inside Newgate Prison, London, UK (1584 words)
Because prisons were privately run, any time spent in prison had to be paid for by the prisoner; gaoler in those times was a lucrative position, and one that had to be paid for.
Prisoners were also housed according to their ability to pay, ranging from a private cell with a cleaning woman and a visiting prostitute, to simply lying on the floor with no cover and barely any clothes.
Gathered around their coffins, the prisoners would listen to a lengthy sermon on the Sunday before they were taken to the Tyburn tree, with the fee-paying public in the gallery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m