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Encyclopedia > Newfoundland (island)
Newfoundland Tricolour Flag
(unofficial)
Geography
Area: 111,390 km²
Water area: 7,797 km²
Coastline: 9,656 km
Highest Point: Lewis Hills
814 m
Longest River: Exploits River
246 km[1]
Admin HQ: St. John's, Newfoundland
Demographics
Population(2006): 505,409.[2]
Major Ethnic Groups : English, Irish, Some Scottish and French
Largest City: St. John's
99,182 (city)
172,915 (metro)
Politics
Government of Newfoundland & Labrador
http://www.gov.nl.ca
Members of the House of Commons: 6 (of 7 in NL and 308 total)
Members of the Canadian Senate: 6 (of 6 in NL and 105 total)
Members of the House of Assembly: 44 (of 48 total)

Newfoundlandpronunciation  IPA: ['nuw fən 'lænd] (French: Terre-Neuve, Irish: Talamh an Éisc) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Image File history File links Flag_of_Newfoundland. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Newfoundland Tricolour is a popular but unofficial flag of Newfoundland and Labrador, or sometimes more specifically, of just the island of Newfoundland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3228x3090, 4381 KB)The island of Newfoundland http://www. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... km redirects here. ... The Lewis Hills is a section of the Long Range Mountains located on the west coast of the island of Newfoundland, along the Gulf of St. ... The Exploits River is a river that flows through central Newfoundland, Canada. ... St. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... “Scot” redirects here. ... St. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... Colonial Building, the House of Assembly of the Dominion of Newfoundland Chamber of the House of Assembly in the Confederation Building. ... Image File history File links Newfoundland. ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Capital St. ...


The island of Newfoundland (originally called Terra Nova) was most likely first named by the Italian John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto) in 1497. The province where this island is located was also called "Newfoundland" until 2001, when its name was changed to "Newfoundland and Labrador" (the postal abbreviation was later changed from NF to NL). Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Geographical renaming is the act of changing the name of a geographical feature or area. ...


Some believe Newfoundland might be the island called Vinland as referenced in Norse documents, however this remains a matter of considerable debate since Vinland's location has yet to be verified. Vinland was the name given to a part of North America by the Icelandic norseman Leif Eiríksson, about the year (AD) 1000. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...

Contents

The island of Newfoundland is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by the Strait of Belle Isle and from Cape Breton Island by the Cabot Strait. It blocks the mouth of the Saint Lawrence River, creating the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, the world's largest estuary. Newfoundland's nearest neighbour is the tiny French overseas community of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon. Labrador Peninsula, Canada Labrador Peninsula is a large peninsula in eastern Canada. ... The Strait of Belle Isle (French: Détroit de Belle Île), sometimes referred to as Straits of Belle Isle or Labrador Straits) is a waterway in eastern Canada that separates the Labrador Peninsula from the island of Newfoundland, in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Nova Scotia peninsula (white), and Cape Breton Island (red) Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada NASA landsat photo of Cape Breton Island Cape Breton Island (French: île du Cap-Breton, Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Cheap Breatuinn, Míkmaq: Únamakika, simply: Cape Breton) is an island on the Atlantic coast of North... Cabot Strait is a strait in eastern Canada approximately 110 kilometres wide between Cape Ray, Newfoundland Island and Cape North, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. ... TheSaint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Bathymetry of the Gulf, with the Laurentian Channel visible Gulf of Saint Lawrence (French: golfe du Saint-Laurent), the worlds largest estuary, is the outlet of North Americas Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... A collectivité doutre-mer (in English Overseas Community) or COM, is an administrative division of France. ... Motto: A Mare Labor(Latin) From the Sea, Work[] Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Saint-Pierre Official languages French Government  - President of the General Council Stéphane Artano  - Préfet (Prefect) Yves Fauqueur Collectivité doutre-mera of France   - ceded by the UKe 30 May 1814   - Territoire d...


With an area of 111,390 km²,[3] Newfoundland is the world's 16th largest island, and Canada's fourth-largest island. The provincial capital, St. John's, is found on the southeastern tip of the island. Cape Spear, just south of the capital, is North America's easternmost point. The island of Newfoundland has a population (2001) of 466,172. However, it is common to consider all directly neighbouring islands such as New World, Twillingate, Fogo and Bell Islands to be 'part of Newfoundland' (as distinct from Labrador). By that measure, the population is (2001) 485,066 This is a list of islands in the world ordered by area. ... Satellite image of Baffin Island, the largest island in Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Newfoundland and Labrador Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... The 1836 Cape Spear lighthouse Cape Spear, 47°31. ...


Newfoundland has a dialect of English known as Newfoundland English and a dialect of French known as Newfoundland French. It once had a dialect of Irish known as Newfoundland Irish, as well as an Amerindian language, Beothuk. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Newfoundland French is a dialect of French that was once spoken by settlers in the French colony of Newfoundland. ... Newfoundland Irish (Irish: Gaeilge Talamh an Éisc) is a dialect of the Irish language specific to the island of Newfoundland and widely spoken until the mid-20th century. ... Indigenous languages of the Americas (or Amerindian Languages) are spoken by indigenous peoples from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland, encompassing the land masses which constitute the Americas. ... Pre-contact distribution of Beothuk language The Beothuk language (also Beothukan) was the language spoken by the Beothuk indigenous people of Newfoundland. ...


First inhabitants

The first inhabitants of Newfoundland were the probable ancestors of the historical Beothuk inhabitants at the time of European contact. Beothuk means "people" in the Beothuk language. The origins of the Beothuks are uncertain, but it appears that they were a native group that came from Labrador. The culture is now extinct, remembered only in museum, historical and archaeological records. Shanawdithit, the last known Beothuk (a woman), died in St. John's in 1829. Newfoundland, home of the Beothuk The Beothuk (IPA: ) were the native inhabitants of the island of Newfoundland at the time of European contact in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... Statue of Shanawdithit, at the Boyds Cove Beothuk Site, Newfoundland. ...


It is probable that the natives described by the Norsemen as skraelings were Beothuk inhabitants of Labrador and Newfoundland. The first conflicts between Europeans and native peoples may have occurred around 1006 at L'Anse aux Meadows when parties of Norsemen attempted to establish permanent settlements along the coast of Newfoundland. According to Norse sagas, the native skraelings responded so ferociously that the newcomers eventually withdrew and apparently gave up their original intentions to settle. The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... ... Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows LAnse aux Meadows (from the French LAnse-aux-Méduses (Jellyfish Cove)) is a site on the northernmost tip of the island of Newfoundland, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, where the remains... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ...


When other Europeans arrived, beginning with John Cabot in 1497, contact with the Beothuks was established. Estimates of the number of Beothuks on the island at this time vary, ranging from 1,000 to 5,000. Giovanni Caboto (c. ...


As European settlement became year-round and expanded to new areas of the coast the area available to the Beothuks to harvest the marine resources they relied upon was diminished. By the beginning of the nineteenth century there were few Beothuks remaining, many having been killed by settlers or having died as a result of starvation and disease. Government attempts to open a dialogue with the native peoples of Newfoundland came too late to save them.


Some Newfoundland residents can trace a clear Native American ancestry, mostly Mi'kmaq. First Nations is a term of ethnicity used in Canada. ... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ...


European discovery, colonization, and settlement

Newfoundland is the site of the only authenticated Norse settlement in North America, discovered by Norwegian explorer Dr. Helge Ingstad and his archaeologist wife, Anne Stine Ingstad, at L'Anse aux Meadows in 1960. The site of a multi-year archaeological dig, the settlement dating to more than 500 years before Christopher Columbus, contains the earliest known European structures in North America. Named a World Heritage site by UNESCO, it is believed to be the Vinland settlement of explorer Leif Ericson. The Norse stayed for a relatively short period of time, believed to be between 999 and 1001 AD. Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ... Ingstad in his trapper days in the late 1920s (photo from his book The Land of Feast and Famine, 1933). ... Dr. Anne Stine Ingstad (1918 – 1997) was a Norwegian archaeologist who, along with her husband Dr. Helge Ingstad, discovered the remains of a Viking settlement at LAnse aux Meadows in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador in 1960. ... Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows LAnse aux Meadows (from the French LAnse-aux-Méduses (Jellyfish Cove)) is a site on the northernmost tip of the island of Newfoundland, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, where the remains... Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from Greek: αρχαίος, archae, ancient; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Vinland was the name given to a part of North America by the Icelandic norseman Leif Eiríksson, about the year (AD) 1000. ... Leif Eriksson (Old Norse: Leifr Eiríksson)[1] (c. ... Events Silesia is incorporated into territory ruled by Boleslaus I of Poland Pope Silvester II succeeds Pope Gregory V Sigmundur Brestisson introduces christianity in the Faroe Islands Deaths December 16 - Saint Adelaide of Italy (b. ... Events Grand Prince Stephen I of Hungary is named the first King of Hungary by Pope Silvester II. Canonisation of Edward the Martyr, king of England. ...


Other speculative discoverers of the island would fall to other nationalities of Europe. The Irish Saint Brendan, who has been popularized in Newfoundland song 'Saint Brendan's Voyage’, is noted among possible discoverers of Newfoundland. Welsh folklore makes note of explorer and Prince Madoc who landed in America in 1170. No detail is given of his route or the lands that was attributed to his discovery. Then there is the Scottish who claim that the Earl of the Orkneys, Prince Henry Sinclair had discovered the New World in the late 1300s. The Portuguese also lay claim to discovering the New World in 1431 when Prince Henry the Navigator discovered the Azores and with the by virtue of the existence of the Paris Map c. 1490 which depicts a group of three islands southwest of Iceland at roughly the same latitude as Ireland, Newfoundland and possibly some other, nearby islands (such as Cape Breton). These three islands are known as 'Islands of the Seven Cities' and 'The Isle of Brasile' said to be discovered by seven bishops. Documents from the voyages made by Bristol merchants in 1480 speak of a trip in search of the Isle of Brasile, to no avail. This article is about Saint Brendan of Clonfert. ... Wales has a long and rich folklore tradition which has its roots in the wider Celtic and Indo-European cultural heritage but is nevertheless unique and distinctive. ... Madoc (Madog or Madawg) ap Owain Gwynedd was a Welsh prince who, according to legend, discovered America in 1170, over three hundred years before Christopher Columbuss voyage in 1492. ... Henry I Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, Baron of Roslin, and Lord of Shetland (c. ... Infante Henrique, Duke of Viseu KG (Porto, March 4, 1394–Sagres, November 13, 1460); pron. ... Motto (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,333 km² (n/a) 911 sq mi... Antillia (or Antilia) was a phantom island said to lie in the Atlantic Ocean far to the west of Spain. ...


After the departure of the Norse, the island would be left to the aboriginal populations for nearly 500 years until the island was rediscovered by the Italian navigator John Cabot, in 1497. The exact place where John Cabot landed is popularly believed to be Bonavista, along the island's East coast,[4] although other sites along the East coast also have significant claims. Perhaps the site with the best claim is Cape Bauld, at the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. It is supported by a document found in the Spanish National Archives written by a Bristol merchant which reports that the crew landed 1,800 miles west of Dursey Head, Ireland (latitude 51 34'N) which would put Cabot within sight of Cape Bauld. Also in this document is mention of an island that Cabot sailed past to go ashore on the mainland. This description fits with Cape Bauld theory, Belle Isle being not far offshore.[4] Giovanni Caboto (c. ... Categories: Towns | Newfoundland and Labrador communities | Coastal towns of Canada | Canada-place stubs ... Cape Bauld is the headland for the northern tip of the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland, Canada. ... The Great Northern Peninsula is the largest and longest peninsula of the island of Newfoundland, Canada, approximately 225km long and a width of 80km at its widest point and encompasses an area of 17,483km2. ... An island, 52 square kilometres in area, 16 km long and 5 km wide, located at 52º01N latitude 55º17W longitude. ...

James Cook's 1775 Chart of Newfoundland

After Cabot, the first European visitors to Newfoundland were Portuguese, Spanish, French and English migratory fishermen. Late in the 17th century came Irish fishermen, who named the island Talamh an Éisc, meaning "land of the fish", or "the fishing grounds" in Irish Gaelic. This was to foreshadow the centuries of importance of Newfoundland's offshore fishing waters. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1462, 520 KB) Description: A general chart of the island of Newfoundland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1462, 520 KB) Description: A general chart of the island of Newfoundland. ... James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. ... Percentage of Irish speakers by county; Northern Ireland is also included. ...


In 1583, when Sir Humphrey Gilbert formally claimed Newfoundland as a colony of England, he found numerous English, French and Portuguese vessels in St. John's. However there was no permanent population and Gilbert was lost at sea during his return voyage, thereby ending any plans of settlement. Sir Humphrey Gilbert (c. ...


On July 5, 1610, John Guy set sail from Bristol, England with 39 other colonists for Cuper's Cove. This, and other early attempts at permanent settlement failed to make a profit for the English investors, but some settlers remained anyway, forming the very earliest European population on the island. By 1620, the fishermen of England's West Country had excluded other nations from most of the east coast of Newfoundland, while fishermen from France dominated the island's south coast and Northern Peninsula. is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... John Gay (d. ... This article is about the English city. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Cupers Cove on the southwest shore of Conception Bay on Newfoundlands Avalon Peninsula was an early English settlement in the New World, and the second one after the Jamestown Settlement to endure for longer than a year. ... The West Country is an informal term for the area of south-western England roughly corresponding to the modern South West England government region. ...


After 1713, with the Treaty of Utrecht, the French ceded control of south and north shores of the island to the British, keeping only the nearby islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon located in the fish-rich Grand Banks off the south coast. Despite some early settlements by the English, permanent, year-round settlement of Newfoundland of migratory fishery workers was discouraged by the British. But with the geographic remoteness of its isolated harbours and convenience of year-round access to the fish stations without having to make the bi-annual voyage across the ocean, permanent settlement increased rapidly by the late 18th century, peaking in the early years of the 19th century. A map depicting the major changes in Western Europes borders as a result of the Treaties of Utrecht and Rastatt. ... Map showing the Grand Banks Historic map of the Grand Banks. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The French name for the island is Terre Neuve, while the name "Newfoundland"' is one of the oldest European place names in Canada in continuous geographical and cartographical use, dating from a 1502 letter, and clearly stated in the following early poem: Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study, practice, science and art of making maps or globes. ...


A Skeltonicall continued ryme, in praise of my New-found-Land John Skelton (c. ...

Although in cloaths, company, buildings faire
With England, New-found-land cannot compare:
Did some know what contentment I found there,
Alwayes enough, most times somewhat to spare,
With little paines, lesse toyle, and lesser care,
Exempt from taxings, ill newes, Lawing, feare,
If cleane, and warme, no matter what you weare,
Healthy, and wealthy, if men carefull are,
With much-much more, then I will now declare,
(I say) if some wise men knew what this were
(I doe beleeue) they'd live no other where.
From 'The First Booke of Qvodlibets'
Composed and done at Harbor-Grace in
Britaniola, anciently called Newfound-Land
by Governor Robert Hayman - 1628.
A Newfoundland fishing outport

The European immigrants who settled in Newfoundland brought their knowledge, beliefs, loyalties and prejudices with them, but the society they built in the New World was unlike the ones they had left, and different from the ones other immigrants would build on the American mainland. As a fish-exporting society, Newfoundland was in contact with many places around the Atlantic rim, but its geographic location and political distinctiveness also isolated it from its closest neighbours in Canada and the United States, so much so that this isolation can be felt even today. Internally, most of its population was spread widely around a rugged coastline in small outport settlements, many of them a long distance from larger centers of population and isolated for long periods by winter ice or bad weather. These conditions had an effect on the culture the immigrants had brought with them and generated new ways of thinking and acting, giving Newfoundland and Labrador a wide variety of distinctive customs, beliefs, stories, songs, and dialects. Robert Hayman (1575-1629) was a poet, colonist and Proprietary Governor of Bristols Hope colony in Newfoundland. ... Village of Fogo, Fogo Island, Newfoundland This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Village of Fogo, Fogo Island, Newfoundland This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


The First World War had a powerful and lasting effect on the society. From a population of about a quarter of a million, 5,482 men went overseas. Nearly 1,500 were killed and 2,300 wounded. On July 1, 1916, at Beaumont-Hamel, France, 753 men of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment went over the top of a trench. The casualties were staggering; the next morning, only 68 men answered the roll-call. Newfoundland had lost about one-quarter of its young men in WWI and it has been suggested that this loss of so many men, proportionally speaking, in the prime of their lives contributed to the economic collapse that was to ultimately influence confederation with Canada. Even now, when the rest of Canada celebrates the founding of the country on July 1, many Newfoundlanders take part in solemn ceremonies of remembrance. The Royal Newfoundland Regiment is a militia unit of the Canadian Armed Forces. ...


World War II also had a lasting impact on Newfoundland. In particular, the war ushered in an American presence at the military bases at Argentia, Gander, Stephenville, Goose Bay and St. John's. Interaction with the bases helped make cash a more widespread economic medium and consolidated a traditional admiration for the United States[citation needed].

Joseph Smallwood signing the document bringing Newfoundland into Confederation.

Newfoundland and Labrador is the youngest province in Canada, which existed as a British colony until 1949, self-governing from 1855-1934, holding Dominion status from 1907-1934 (see Dominion of Newfoundland). In late 1948, the population voted 52.3% to 47.7%[5] in favour of joining Canada, with opposition to Canada being concentrated in the capital, St. John's, and on the Avalon Peninsula. Newfoundland joined Canada on March 31, 1949. Union with Canada has done little to reduce Newfoundlanders' self-image as a unique group, with 72% identifying themselves as being primarily Newfoundlanders, secondarily Canadians, in 2003.[6] Separatist sentiment is low, though—12% in the same 2003 study. Image File history File links Joseph_Smallwood_signing_Newfoundland_into_Confederation. ... Image File history File links Joseph_Smallwood_signing_Newfoundland_into_Confederation. ... Joey Smallwood (center) The Honourable Joseph Roberts Joey Smallwood, PC , CC , LL.D (December 24, 1900 – December 18, 1991) was the last Father of Confederation in Canada, bringing Newfoundland into Confederation in 1949. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Anthem: Ode to Newfoundland Capital St. ... The Avalon Peninsula is a large peninsula (9,270 km²) that makes up the southeast portion of the island of Newfoundland. ...


The referendum campaign was bitterly fought and interests in both Canada and Britain favoured and supported confederation with Canada. This is exemplified in the role of Jack Pickersgill, a western Canadian native and politician, who worked with the confederation camp during the campaign. Religion played a significant role in the final analysis as well with the Catholic church lobbying for continued independence. Financial incentives played their part, particularly the "baby bonus" which promised Newfoundlanders a cash sum for each child in a family. The Confederates were led by the charismatic Joseph Smallwood, a former radio broadcaster who had developed socialist political inclinations while working for a socialist newspaper in New York. His policies as premier would assume a form closer to liberalism than socialism. Mr. Smallwood led Newfoundland for decades as the elected premier following confederation and achieved a "cult of personality" amongst his many supporters that persisted long after his political defeat. Indeed, some homes actually had pictures of Joey in their living rooms in a place of prominence. It has been suggested that some members of the public regarded financial incentives like the baby bonus as the direct products of Smallwood's benevolence rather than their right as Canadian citizens. Joey Smallwood (center) The Honourable Joseph Roberts Joey Smallwood, PC , CC , LL.D (December 24, 1900 – December 18, 1991) was the last Father of Confederation in Canada, bringing Newfoundland into Confederation in 1949. ...


The province's provincial flag, designed by Newfoundland artist Christopher Pratt, was officially adopted by the provincial legislature on May 28, 1980. Labrador has its own unofficial flag, created in 1973 by Mike Martin, former Member of the Legislative Assembly for Labrador South. There is also an unofficial "Pink, White and Green" flag of nineteenth century origins. The flag was flown on sealing vessels well into the 20th century. Its colours represent the symbolic union of Newfoundland's three historically dominant ethnic/religious group: English, Scottish and Irish respectively. Sealers also used the flag as a marker to distinguish cached seal pellets on the ice from the caches of other nations. It is now flown outside many Newfoundland homes, although it is mistaken by many tourists as the Irish flag. This "unofficial" flag has seen a rise in popularity in recent years, before which it had been relatively forgotten by a majority of Newfoundlanders. "Pink White and Green" emblems now appear on a multitude of items in Newfoundland gift shops, and it has developed into a symbolic gesture of one's ties with one's Newfoundland heritage as well as a trendy fashion statement. Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador The flag of Newfoundland and Labrador was introduced in 1980, and was designed by Newfoundland artist Christopher Pratt. ... John Christopher Pratt (born 1935 in St. ... The flag of Labrador. ... A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Newfoundland Tricolour is a popular but unofficial flag of Newfoundland and Labrador, or sometimes more specifically, of just the island of Newfoundland. ...


Points of interest and major settlements

Cod, the traditional mainstay of Newfoundland fisheries

Being one of the first places in the New World to which Europeans traveled, Newfoundland has a rich history. St. John's is considered to be the oldest city in English speaking North America. Cod flakes are platforms upon which a catch of fish would dry in the sun before being packed in the salt traditionally used to preserve cod. ... Cod flakes are platforms upon which a catch of fish would dry in the sun before being packed in the salt traditionally used to preserve cod. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... St. ...


Newfoundland is home to two national parks. Gros Morne National Park is located on the west coast of Newfoundland and was named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1987 due to its complex geology and remarkable scenery. It is the largest national park in Atlantic Canada at 1 805 km² (697 sq. mi.). Terra Nova National Park, on the island's east side, preserves the rugged geography of the Bonavista Bay region and allows visitors to explore the historic interplay of land, sea and man. Western Brook Pond. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The four Canadian Atlantic provinces. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Terra Nova National Park is located on the northeast coast of Newfoundland along several inlets of Bonavista Bay. ... Bonavista Bay is a large bay located on the northeast coast of the island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...


Newfoundland also contains a major hiking trail that runs along the eastern edge of the Avalon Peninsula. The East Coast Trail extends for 220 km, beginning near Fort Amherst in St. John's and ending in Cappahayden, with an additional 320 km of trail under construction. The trail winds along the coast, bringing hikers through many small fishing villages and along long stretches of rocky, uninhabited coastline. The Avalon Peninsula is a large peninsula (9,270 km²) that makes up the southeast portion of the island of Newfoundland. ... The East Coast Trail is a 220 km hiking trail located in Newfoundland, Canada. ... KM, Km, or km may stand for: Khmer language (ISO 639 alpha-2, km) Kilometre Kinemantra Meditation Knowledge management KM programming language KM Culture, Korean Movie Maker. ... St. ... Cappahayden is a small community located on the east coast of the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland, Canada. ...


Stephenville, a town of about 8000, once served as an airbase for the US Army and Air Force in the early 1940s to 1966. It is about 32 km (20 miles) north of its former train station, which is surrounded by the town of Stephenville Crossing. Stephenville (2005 est. ... STEPHENVILLE CROSSING (inc. ...


Also on the West Coast, Corner Brook is situated in the Bay of Islands region. The major industry in Corner Brook is newsprint manufacturing, and is serviced by the Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Mill. Corner Brook[1] is a city located in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located on the Humber River. ... The Bay of Islands is located on the west coast of the island of islands that are scattered throughout it, some of which were populated for generations with fishing families, but since the mid 20th century the islands are used mainly for camping and family cabins. ...


Sandy Point, which is located in St. George's Bay and north of the town of St. George's, was the first and largest settlement of the west coast. However, the last settler, Alphonsus Swyers, was forced to abandon it in 1973. Sandy Point is a former peninsula which is now turned an island, due to the rising in the water level and a storm that eroded the connecting sand spit known to locals as The Gap. Located on the west coast of Newfoundland in Bay St. ... St. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...

Island of Newfoundland

Barachois Pond Provincial Park is a provincial park that is considered to be a model forest. Island of Newfoundland in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Island of Newfoundland in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Barachois Pond Provincial Park is a large and popular Provincial Park in the southwest of the island of Newfoundland. ...


Marble Mountain is a major attraction in the winter for skiers. It is said to be the best skiing east of the Rocky Mountains. Marble Mountain is a mountain located on the west coast of the Canadian island of Newfoundland in the Long Range Mountains. ... The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ...


Tilting Harbour on Fogo Island is a Provincial Heritage District as well as a National Cultural Landscape District of Canada, one of only two national historic sites in Canada so recognized for their Irishness. Tilting is a town on the eastern end of Fogo Island off the northeast coast of Newfoundland. ... Fogo village, Newfoundland Fogo Island, the largest of Newfoundlands offshore islands, is off the Northeast Coast of Newfoundland near Lewisporte and Twillingate. ...


In March, the annual seal hunt (of the harp seal) takes place. Binomial name Phoca groenlandica Erxleben, 1777 // Harp seals resemble harbor seals in body and head form, but are larger: adult Harp Seals grow to 1. ...


Newfoundland is also host to a well-recognized university, Memorial University of Newfoundland, based in St. John's. Memorial University of Newfoundland, (popularly known as Memorial University or MUN) is a comprehensive university located primarily in St. ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Newfoundland and Labrador Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ...


George Street, located in downtown St. John's, is closed to traffic twenty hours a day, and is widely understood to have the most pubs per square foot of any street in North America.


Largest Municipalities (2006 population)

  1. St. John's (100,646)
  2. Mount Pearl (24,671)
  3. Conception Bay South (21,966)
  4. Corner Brook (20,083)
  5. Grand Falls-Windsor (13,558)
  6. Paradise (12,584)
  7. Gander (9,951)
  8. Stephenville (6,588)
  9. Portugal Cove-St. Philip's (5,575)
  10. Torbay (6,281)
  11. Marystown (5,436)
  12. Bay Roberts (5,414)
  13. Clarenville (5,274)
  14. Deer Lake (4,827)
  15. Carbonear (4,723)
  16. Channel-Port aux Basques (4,319)
  17. Placentia (3,898)
  18. Bonavista (3,764)
  19. Bishop's Falls (3,399)
  20. Lewisporte (3,308)

Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Newfoundland and Labrador Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... Mount Pearl is a city on the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, in Division No. ... Conception Bay South (2005 pop. ... Overlooking City of Corner Brook from James Cook Park Corner Brook is a city located in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located on the Humber River. ... Grand Falls-Windsor is a community in north-central Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Paradise is a town on the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Gander is a Canadian town located in northeastern part of the island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, approximately 40 kilometres south of Gander Bay, a little over 100 kilometres from the town of Twillingate and 90 kilometres east of Grand Falls. ... Stephenville (2005 est. ... Portugal Cove-St. ... The name Torbay comes from an area of the same name in Devonshire, England and was first mapped in 1615 by John Mason. ... A canadian town in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador with a population of only 7000. ... The town of Bay Roberts (, NST) is located on the north shore of Conception Bay on the Bay de Verde Peninsula in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Clarenville (2006 pop. ... The sun sets over Deer Lake, Newfoundland, June 2003. ... Carbonear (, ) is a town on the Bay de Verde Peninsula in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Port aux Basques and the other Marine Atlantic ferry ports Channel-Port aux Basques (also Port aux Basques) is a town at the extreme southwestern tip of the island of Newfoundland fronting on the eastern end of the Cabot Strait. ... Panorama of Placentia. ... Categories: Towns | Newfoundland and Labrador communities | Coastal towns of Canada | Canada-place stubs ... Bishops Falls is a town in north-central Newfoundland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... Lewisporte is a small town in central Newfoundland, with a population of about 3312. ...

Notable Newfoundlanders

Augusta Barter (nee Blundon) (1909 - July 8, 1999) is a Canadian nurse. ... David Blackwood, Seabird Hunters from Pound Cove, etching and aquatint, 12 x 18, 2005. ... Christa Bordens[1] career as one of Newfoundland and Labradors top up and coming singer/songwriters began long before she was named the winner of Popstars: The One in April of 2003. ... Countries which had a version of Popstars Popstars is an international reality television program and a precursor to the Idol series. ... DArcy Broderick an Newfoundland-Irish musician who plays fiddle, guitar, mandola, banjo, accordion and mandolin is best known as a member of the popular Irish-Newfoundland bands The Irish Descendants and The Fables. ... Johnny Burke was a lyricist who died in 1964 Johnny Burke at the St. ... Daniel Cleary (born 18 December 1978 in Bonavista, Newfoundland and Labrador) is a professional ice hockey winger playing for the Detroit Red Wings . ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Ryane Clowe (born September 30, 1982, Fermeuse, Newfoundland) is a Canadian ice hockey player for the NHLs San Jose Sharks. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Frances Cluett Frances Cluett (1883 – 1969) was an army nurse and educator from Newfoundland, noted for her service during World War I, and especially for her many letters back home beginning in 1916 that conveyed the eye-opening experiences of a young woman leaving home for the first time and... Robert Bob Cole (born 1933 in Newfoundland) is a Canadian television announcer. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Michael Crummey (born Buchans, Newfoundland and Labrador) is a Canadian writer. ... Portrait of Demasduwit (Mary March), Library and Archives Canada Demasduwit (c. ... Newfoundland, home of the Beothuk The Beothuk (IPA: ) were the native inhabitants of the island of Newfoundland at the time of European contact in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gwynne Dyer, Ph. ... William James Emberley (June 26, 1876 – unknown) of Bay de Verde, Newfoundland, Canada. ... Alex Alexander Faulkner (born on May 21, 1936 in Bishops Falls, Newfoundland) is a retired professional ice hockey player and was the first National Hockey League player from Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Rex Goudie is a Canadian singer, songwriter and was the runner-up of Canadian Idol 3. ... Canadian Idol is a reality television show on the Canadian television network CTV, based on the popular British show Pop Idol and its American counterpart American Idol. ... Great Big Sea (often shortened to GBS) is a Canadian folk-rock band from Newfoundland and Labrador, best known for performing energetic rock interpretations of traditional Newfoundland folk songs including sea shanties, which draw from the islands 500-year-old Irish, English, and French heritage. ... Bradley Raymond Brad Gushue, ONL, LL.D. (hon. ... Ann Harvey (1811 – 1860) fisherperson and rescurer born near the small fishing community of Isle aux Morts, Newfoundland, Canada. ... Kenneth Joseph Thomas Harvey (born 22 January 1962) is a Canadian writer. ... William James Herder (1849 – 1922) publisher, born Old Perlican, Newfoundland, Canada, was the founder of Newfoundlands first daily newspaper, The Evening Telegram. ... General Richard J. Hillier, CMM, MSC, CD, BSc (born 1955), is the Chief of the Defence Staff of the Canadian Forces. ... The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) (French: le Chef détat-major de la défense) is the senior member of the Canadian Forces and reports directly to the Minister of National Defence. ... Ron Hynes is a popular folk singer-songwriter from Newfoundland. ... Sylvester Joe (unknown – 1839), hunter and explorer, born Bay dEspoir, Newfoundland, Canada. ... Wayne Johnston (born 1958 in in Goulds, Newfoundland) is a Canadian novelist. ... // Walter John Learning is a Canadian theatre director and actor, and founder of Theatre New Brunswick. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Shaun Majumder is a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Richard Vincent (Rick) Mercer (born October 17, 1969 in St. ... Rex Murphy (born March, 1947, Carbonear, Newfoundland) is a noted Canadian commentator. ... Nonosbawsut (unknown – March 1819) was a leader of the Beothuk people. ... Newfoundland, home of the Beothuk The Beothuk (IPA: ) were the native inhabitants of the island of Newfoundland at the time of European contact in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... Jim Payne (born c. ... Gordon Edward Pinsent (born July 12, 1930 in Grand Falls, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) is a Canadian television, theatre and film actor. ... The cover of An Island In The Sky: Selected Poetry of Al Pittman. ... John Christopher Pratt (born 1935 in St. ... Edwin John Dove Pratt (February 4, 1882 - April 26, 1964), who published as E. J. Pratt, was a Canadian poet from Newfoundland. ... Wayne Scott Ray (born 1950 in Alabama) is a Canadian poet. ... Thomas Ricketts, V.C. (Royal Newfoundland Regiment) Thomas (Tommy) Ricketts (April 15, 1901 – February 10, 1967) was a Newfoundlander and a recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Michael Ryder (Born March 31, 1980, Bonavista, Newfoundland) is a hockey player who plays for the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League as a right wing. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Statue of Shanawdithit, at the Boyds Cove Beothuk Site, Newfoundland. ... Newfoundland, home of the Beothuk The Beothuk (IPA: ) were the native inhabitants of the island of Newfoundland at the time of European contact in the 15th and 16th centuries. ... Craig Sharpe Craig Sharpe (born in Carbonear but now living in born in Upper Island Cove, Newfoundland & Labrador) is a contestant of Canadian Idol 4 who is a member of the top ten who beat out 12,000 other competitors. ... The fourth season of Canadian Idol began in February 2006 ran until September 2006. ... Joseph Smallwood signs the document bringing Newfoundland into Confederation. ... Gerald Arthur Rod Snow (born May 1, 1970 near Come By Chance, Newfoundland) is a former professional rugby prop. ... Georgina Ann Stirling (April 3, 1866 – April 23, 1935) was a Canadian opera singer, known by her stage name Marie Toulinquet. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Kim Stockwood (born on 11 November 1965 in St. ... Gerald Squires, Light on the Barrens, oil on canvas, 54 x 72, 2005. ... Sebastian Spence (born December 9, 1969, in St. ... Brian Vincent Tobin, PC (born October 21, 1954 in Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador) is a Canadian politician. ... Shannon Lee Tweed (born March 10, 1957, St. ... Daniel Danny Williams, QC, LL.B, BA, MHA (born August 4, 1949 in St. ...

Further reading

Modern literature

  • Peter Neary. 1996. Newfoundland in the North Atlantic world, 1929-1949. McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal, Quebec.
  • Henry K. Gibbons. 1997. The Myth and Mystery of John Cabot: The Discoverer of North America, Marten Cat Publishers, Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland.
  • Michael Harris. 1992. Rare Ambition: The Crosbies of Newfoundland. Penguin. ISBN 0-14-023220-6
  • Kevin Major, As Near To Heaven by Sea, (Toronto, 2001)
  • John Gimlette, Theatre of Fish, (Hutchinson, London, 2005). ISBN 0-09-179519-2
  • E. Annie Proulx, The Shipping News, (Simon & Schuster, 1993). ISBN 0-74322540-6

Michael Harris (born 1948) is an award-winning Canadian author, investigative journalist, and radio personality who hosts an afternoon radio talk show, Michael Harris Live, on Ottawa-based CFRA, and is a columnist for The Ottawa Sun newspaper. ... Kevin Major (born September 12, 1949) is a Canadian childrens author who lives in St. ... Edna Annie Proulx (pronounced ) (born August 22, 1935) is an American journalist and author. ... The Shipping News is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by E. Annie Proulx which was published in 1993, and a film of the same name, released in 2001, set on the Canadian island of Newfoundland. ...

Vintage literature

  • D. W. Prowse, A History of Newfoundland (1895), current edition 2002, Boulder Publications, Portugal Cove, Newfoundland.
  • Charles Pedley, History of Newfoundland, (London, 1863)
  • Philip Tocque, Newfoundland as it Was and Is, (London, 1878)
  • Joseph Hatton and Moses Harvey, Newfoundland: Its History and Present Condition, (London, 1883)
  • Arnold Kennedy, Sport and Adventure in Newfoundland and West Indies, (London, 1885)
  • Moses Harvey, Newfoundland, England's Oldest Colony, (London, 1897)
  • F. E. Smith, The Story of Newfoundland, (London, 1901)
  • Beckles Wilson, The Truth About Newfoundland, The Tenth Island, (second edition, London, 1901)
  • J. P. Howley, Mineral Resources of Newfoundland, (St. John's, 1909)
  • P. T. McGrath, Newfound in 1911, (London, 1911)

Daniel Woodley Prowse (September 12, 1834 – January 27, 1914) lawyer, politician, judge, historian, essayist, and office holder, born Port de Grave, Newfoundland, Canada, fourth of the seven children of Robert Prowse and Jane Woodley. ... Moses Harvey LL.D. (March 21, 1820 – September 3, 1901) clergyman, essayist and naturalist born Armagh, Northern Ireland and died in St. ... Moses Harvey LL.D. (March 21, 1820 – September 3, 1901) clergyman, essayist and naturalist born Armagh, Northern Ireland and died in St. ...

References

  1. ^ Atlas of Canada - Rivers. Natural Resources Canada (2004-10-26). Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  2. ^ Statistics Canada 2006 Census Information (PDF). Newfoundland & Labrador Statistics Agency.
  3. ^ Area of the island and other general information from Newfoundland and Labrador tourism
  4. ^ a b Kevin Major (August 2002). As Near to Heaven by Sea: A History of Newfoundland and Labrador. Penguin Books. ISBN 0140278648. 
  5. ^ Baker, Melvin (1987). "The Tenth Province: Newfoundland joins Canada, 1949". Horizon 10 (11): 2641-67. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  6. ^ Ryan Research and Communications (April 2003). Provincial Opinion Survey. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador's Royal Commission on Renewing and Strengthening Our Place in Canada. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ...

See also

Look up Newfoundland (island) in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... This page is about the possible island called Bacalao, for the Portuguese dish that is also known as Bacalao, see Bacalhau. ... This article, image, template or category belongs in one or more categories. ... Ernest Harmon AFB is a former United States Air Force base located in Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador The flag of Newfoundland and Labrador was introduced in 1980, and was designed by Newfoundland artist Christopher Pratt. ... The Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador (HFNL) is a non-profit organization which was established by the Provincial Government of Newfoundland and Labrador in 1984 to stimulate an understanding of and an appreciation for the architectural heritage of the province. ... Trans-Labrador Highway Trans-Canada Highway This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Nearly all of the rivers and creeks flow right into the Atlantic. ... This page lists communities of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... . Songs with an unknown composer/lyricist (Traditional) A Great Big Sea Hove In Long Beach Excursion Around the Bay Feller from Fortune Ise the By Jack Was Every Inch A Sailor Lukeys Boat Mussels in the Corner Old Polina The North Atlantic Squadron Sally Brown Star of... List of people of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Newfoundland and Labrador, granted by King Charles I in 1637. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Newfoundland Irish (Irish: Gaeilge Talamh an Éisc) is a dialect of the Irish language specific to the island of Newfoundland and widely spoken until the mid-20th century. ... Scouting in Newfoundland and Labrador has a long history, from the 1900s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Newfoundland (island)

Coordinates: 49°00′N, 56°00′W Replica of Pedro Alvares Cabrals ship Anunciação, in the city of Campinas, state of São Paulo, Brazil. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Newfoundland and Labrador - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2668 words)
The island was later inhabited by the Mi'kmaq and the Beothuks.
Newfoundland received a colonial assembly in 1832, which was and still is referred to as the House of Assembly, after a fight led by reformers William Carson, Patrick Morris and John Kent.
Newfoundland's long-standing Labrador boundary dispute with Canada was resolved to the satisfaction of Newfoundland and Canada (but not Quebec, the province that bordered Labrador) with the ruling, on April 1, 1927 by the Imperial Privy Council.
Newfoundland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2549 words)
Newfoundland (French: Terre-Neuve; Irish: Talamh an Éisc; Latin: Terra Nova) is a large island off the northeast coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Newfoundland is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by the Strait of Belle Isle and from Cape Breton Island by the Cabot Strait.
Newfoundland shares a border with France, as the nearby islands of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon are French-ruled territory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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