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Encyclopedia > Newdigate prize

Sir Roger Newdigate's Prize is awarded to students of the University of Oxford for Best Composition in English verse by an undergraduate who has not yet been in attendance at Oxford for four years since his or her date of admittance. It was founded by Sir Roger Newdigate, Bt (1719-1806) in the 18th century. The winning poem is read at Encaenia. The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Sir Roger Newdigate (May 30, 1719-November 23, 1806) was an English politician and collector of antiquities. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Encaenia (Gk: festival of renewal) is an annual ceremony which takes place at some universities, most notably the University of Oxford. ...


Instructions are published as follows: "The length of the poem is not to exceed 300 lines. The metre is not restricted to heroic couplets, but dramatic form of composition is not allowed."


Notable winners have included Robert Stephen Hawker, John Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, Laurence Binyon, Oscar Wilde, John Buchan, John Addington Symonds, James Fenton, Diran Adebayo and Alan Hollinghurst. Robert Stephen Hawker (3 December 1803 - 15 August 1875), was an English poet, antiquarian of Cornwall, Anglican clergyman and reputed eccentric. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... Robert Laurence Binyon (August 10, 1869 at Lancaster – March 10, 1943 at Reading, Berkshire) was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... John Addington Symonds was the name of a father and son, both English writers. ... James Fenton (born April 25, 1949, Lincoln, England) has been, at various times, a journalist, poet, literary critic, and professor. ... Born in London in 1968, Diran is the author of Some Kind of Black a novel that won the 1996 Saga Prize. ... Alan Hollinghurst is a British novelist. ...

Contents

Past titles and winners

Where known, the title of the winning poem is given, followed by the name of the author:


Notable 19th Century winners

Robert Stephen Hawker (3 December 1803 - 15 August 1875), was an English poet, antiquarian of Cornwall, Anglican clergyman and reputed eccentric. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... John Addington Symonds was the name of a father and son, both English writers. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Arthur Waugh was an English author, literary critic and publisher, and the father of Alec and Evelyn Waugh. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... Robert Laurence Binyon (August 10, 1869 at Lancaster – March 10, 1943 at Reading, Berkshire) was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar. ...

20th Century

  • 1900. Robespierre. Arthur Carré
  • 1901. Galileo. William Garrod
  • 1902. Minos. Ernest Wodehouse
  • 1903. not awarded
  • 1904. Delphi. George Bell
  • 1905. Garibaldi. Arthur E. E. Reade
  • 1906. The Death of Shelley. Geoffrey Scott
  • 1907. Camoens. Robert Cruttwell
  • 1908. Holyrood. Julian Huxley
  • 1909. Michelangelo. Frank Ashton-Gwatkin
  • 1910. Atlantis. Charles Bewley
  • 1911. Achilles. Roger Heath
  • 1912. Richard I Before Jerusalem. William Greene
  • 1913. Oxford. Maurice Roy Ridley
  • 1914. The Burial of Sophocles. Robert Sterling
  • 1915. not awarded
  • 1916. Venice. Russell Green
  • 1917. suspended due to war
  • 1918. suspended due to war
  • 1919. France. P. H. B. Lyon
  • 1920. The Lake of Garda. George Johnstone
  • 1921. Cervantes. James Laver
  • 1922. Mount Everest. James Reid
  • 1923. London. Christopher Scaife
  • 1924. Michelangelo. Franklin McDuffee
  • 1925. Byron. Edgar McInnes
  • 1926. not awarded
  • 1927. Julia, Daughter of Claudius. Gertrude Trevelyan
  • 1928. The Mermaid Tavern. Angela Cave
  • 1929. The Sands of Egypt. Phyllis Hartnoll
  • 1930. Daedalus. Josephine Fielding
  • 1931. Vanity Fair. Michael Balkwill
  • 1932. Sir Walter Scott. Richard Hennings
  • 1933. Ovid among the Goths. Philip Hubbard
  • 1934. Fire. Edward Lowbury
  • 1935. Canterbury. Allan Plowman
  • 1936. Rain. David Winser
  • 1937. The Man in the Moon. Margaret Stanley-Wrench
  • 1938. Milton Blind. Michael Thwaites
  • 1939. Dr Newman Revisits Oxford. Kenneth Kitchin
  • 1940 - 46. suspended due to war
  • 1947. Nemesis. Merton Atkins
  • 1948. Caesarion. Peter Way
  • 1949. The Black Death. Peter Weitzman
  • 1950. Eldorado. John Bayley
  • 1951. The Queen of Sheba. Michael Hornyansky
  • 1952. Exile. Donald Hall (published in OP 1953)
  • 1953. not awarded
  • 1954. not awarded
  • 1955. Elegy for a Dead Clown. Edwin Evans
  • 1956. The Deserted Altar. David Posner
  • 1957. Leviathan. Robert Maxwell
  • 1958. The Earthly Paradise. Jon Stallworthy
  • 1959. not awarded
  • 1960. A Dialogue between Caliban and Ariel. John Fuller
  • 1961. not awarded
  • 1962. May Morning. Stanley Johnson
  • 1963. not awarded
  • 1964. Disease. James Paterson
  • 1965. Fear. Peter Jay
  • 1966. not awarded
  • 1967. not awarded
  • 1968. The Opening of Japan. James Fenton
  • 1969. not awarded
  • 1970. Instructions to a Painter. Charles Radice
  • 1971. not awarded
  • 1972. The Ancestral Face. Neil Rhodes
  • 1973. The Wife's Tale. Christopher Mann
  • 1974. Death of a Poet. Alan Hollinghurst
  • 1975. The Tides. Andrew Motion
  • 1976. Hostages. David Winzar
  • 1977. The Fool. Michael King
  • 1978. not awarded
  • 1979. not awarded
  • 1980. Inflation. Simon Higginson
  • 1981. not awarded
  • 1982. Souvenirs. Gordon Wattles
  • 1983. Triumphs. Peter McDonald (published in OP I.2)
  • 1984. Fear. James Leader
  • 1985. Magic. Robert Twigger
  • 1986. An Epithalamion. William Morris
  • 1987. Memoirs of Tiresias. Bruce Gibson and Michael Suarez (joint winners)
  • 1988. Elegy. Mark Wormald
  • 1989. The House. Jane Griffiths
  • 1990. Mapping. Roderick Clayton
  • 1991. not awarded
  • 1992. Green Thought. Fiona Sampson
  • 1993. The Landing. Caron Röhsler
  • 1994. Making Sense. James Merino
  • 1995. Judith with the Head of Holofernes. Antony Dunn (published in OP IX.1)
  • 1996. not awarded
  • 1997. not awarded
  • 1998. not awarded
  • 1999. not awarded
  • 2000. A Book of Hours.

George Antonio Bell Mathey (born October 21, 1959, San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Geoffrey Scott (1883 – 1929) was an English scholar and poet, known as a historian of architecture. ... Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, FRS (June 22, 1887 – February 14, 1975) was a English biologist, author, Humanist and internationalist, known for his popularisations of science in books and lectures. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Greene can mean: William Batchelder Greene, (1819-1878) American individualist anarchist and banking reformer William Greene (Rhode Island governor), (1695-1758) American politican See also William Green This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Maurice Roy Ridley (January 25, 1890 - June 12, 1969) was a writer and poet, Fellow and Chaplain of Balliol College, Oxford. ... Robert Sterling, born William Sterling Hart (November 13, 1917 – May 30, 2006), was an American film and television actor. ... George Johnstone (1730-1787) was a British naval officer and member of Parliment during the American Revolution. ... James Reid is the singer and guitarist in the New Zealand band The Feelers. ... Phyllis Hartnoll (September 22, 1906 - January 8, 1997) was a British poet and author. ... Michael Rayner Thwaites, AO (30 May 1915 - 1 November 2005) was an Australian academic, poet, intelligence officer, and activist for Moral Rearmament. ... John Bayley (CBE 1999) was born in 1925 in Lahore, Pakistan (then known as Lahore, British India. ... Donald Hall (born September 20, 1928) is an American poet and the U.S. Poet Laureate. ... Edwin Evans (born March 26, 1849 in Emu Plains, New South Wales; died July 2, 1921 in Walgett) was an Australian cricketer who played in 6 Tests between 1881 and 1886. ... Robert Maxwell Ian Robert Maxwell MC (June 10, 1923 – November 5, 1991) was a Czechoslovakian-born British media proprietor and formerly Member of Parliament (MP), who rose from poverty to build an extensive publishing empire. ... he was a very cool writerf ... A fuller is someone who treats cloth: see Fuller (cloth-making). ... Stanley Johnson Stanley Patrick Johnson (born 18 August 1940 in Cornwall) is a British politician including being a Conservative MEP from 1979 to 1984, noted advocate of population control, and father of Boris Johnson. ... James Paterson may refer to: James Paterson (animator), Canadian animator James Paterson (artist), Scottish artist James Paterson (poet), British poet James Paterson (filmmaker), American filmmaker James Paterson (politician), Mayor of Melbourne between 1876 and 1877 James Paterson (radical), one of the leaders of the Society of the United Scotsmen Jim... The Honourable Peter Jay (born 7 February 1937) is a British economist, broadcaster and diplomat. ... James Fenton (born April 25, 1949, Lincoln, England) has been, at various times, a journalist, poet, literary critic, and professor. ... Christopher Mann (born 1965) is an British composer and began his career by contributing to independent films such as Hard Grit. ... Alan Hollinghurst is a British novelist. ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... Dr Michael King OBE (15 December 1945 - 30 March 2004) was a widely respected Pakeha New Zealand historian, author and biographer. ... Peter McDonald (born in Belfast in 1962) is an author, university lecturer and critic. ... Robert Twigger is a British travel writer and adventurer. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris (March 24, 1834 – October 3, 1896) was an English artist, writer, socialist and activist. ... Jane Griffiths (born 1970) is a British poet. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

21st Century

  • 2005. Lyons. Arina Patrikova
  • 2006. Bee-poems. Paul Thomas Abbott

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Newdigate prize - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (146 words)
Sir Roger Newdigate's Prize is awarded to students of the University of Oxford for Best Composition in English verse by an undergraduate who has not yet been in attendance at Oxford for four years since his or her date of admittance.
It was founded by Sir Roger Newdigate, Bt (1719-1806) in the 18th century.
Instructions are published as follows: "The length of the poem is not to exceed 300 lines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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