FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Newburyport, Massachusetts
Newburyport, Massachusetts
Newburyport's State Street in June 2005
Location in Essex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°48′45″N 70°52′40″W / 42.8125, -70.87778
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Essex
Settled 1635
Incorporated 1764
Government
 - Type Mayor-council city
 - Mayor John F. Moak
Area
 - City  10.6 sq mi (27.4 km²)
 - Land  8.4 sq mi (21.7 km²)
 - Water  2.2 sq mi (5.7 km²)
Elevation  37 ft (11 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 17,189
 - Density 2,050.3/sq mi (791.6/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01950
Area code(s) 351 / 978
FIPS code 25-45245
GNIS feature ID 0614293

Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. A historic seaport with a vibrant tourism industry, Newburyport includes part of Plum Island. The mooring, winter storage and maintenance of recreational boats, motor and sail, still contribute a large part of the city's income. A coast guard station keeps a watchful eye on boating activity, especially in the swift tidal currents of the Merrimack River. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 602 KB) I took this photo in June 13 2005. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Newburyport_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area codes 351 and 978 are Commonwealth of Massachusetts area codes serving the communities of Fitchburg and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Area code 978 is a Commonwealth of Massachusetts area code serving the communities of Lawrence, Lowell and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... Sand dunes in 1908. ... Merrimack River watershed The Merrimack River (or Merrimac River, an earlier spelling that is sometimes still used) is a -long river in the Northeastern United States. ...


At the edge of Newbury Marshes delineating Newburyport to the south an industrial park provides a wide range of jobs. Newburyport is on a major north-south highway, Interstate 95. The outer circumferential highway of Boston, Interstate 495, passes nearby in Amesbury. A colonial road, the Newburyport Turnpike (U. S. Route 1), still traverses Newburyport on its way north. The commuter rail line to Boston ends in a new station at Newburyport. The earlier Boston and Maine Railroad leading further north was discontinued. Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1668 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Thatcher W. Kezer III Area  - City  13. ...

Contents

History

Newburyport was first settled in 1635 as part of "Newberry Plantation," now Newbury. On January 28, 1764, the General Court of Massachusetts passed an act "for erecting part of the town of Newbury into a new town by the name of Newburyport."[1] The act was approved by governor Francis Bernard on February 4, 1764. The town became a city in 1851. Situated near the mouth of the Merrimack River, it was once a fishing, shipbuilding and shipping center, with an industry in silverware manufacture and rum Cuttysark rum clippership logo inspired by Newburyport's shipping days. The seaport declined after President Thomas Jefferson's Embargo of 1807 and the War of 1812 (although a port for privateering during it), which helped preserve Newburyport's charming early appearance. The city's historical highlights include: Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Seal of Newbury, MA Newbury is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... Sir Francis Bernard (1712-1779) was a British colonial administrator who served as Governor in New Jersey and Massachusetts. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Merrimack River watershed The Merrimack River (or Merrimac River, an earlier spelling that is sometimes still used) is a -long river in the Northeastern United States. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... Starch-polyester disposable cutlery Cutlery refers to any hand utensil used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The Embargo Act of 1807 was an American law prohibiting all export of cargo from American ports. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept in naval history. ...

  • First United States Coast Guard station
  • First of many subsequent Clipper ships built here
  • First "Tea Party" rebellion to oppose British Tea Tax
  • First state mint and treasury building
  • Oldest active and continuously running court house
  • Formed the basis for the town of Innsmouth in the H. P. Lovecraft story, "The Shadow over Innsmouth"
  • Subject of the most ambitious community study ever undertaken, the Yankee City project conducted by anthropologist W. Lloyd Warner and his associates

Historic Houses & Museums: USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... Innsmouth is a fictional town in the writings of H.P. Lovecraft, part of the Lovecraft Country setting of the Cthulhu Mythos. ... This article is about the author. ... The Shadow Over Innsmouth is a novella by H.P. Lovecraft. ... William Lloyd Warner (b. ...

Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect; Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. ...

Historic Preservaton

Despite thriving before in the 1950s and 1960s, Newburyport's downtown began to fall into disrepair because of several factors, most notably strip malls taking away from local business and the "car-loving" American family. Because of this, Newburyport was in very bad shape by 1970 and scheduled to be razed. Ideas to rebuild the city's downtown were numerous, ranging from building hotels and new stores to, ironically, a strip mall, with few buildings left for historical reasons. Later, however, even after some building had already been razed, the city signed a federal grant that allowed it to keep its historic architecture. Even today Newburyport is called a stunning example of preserving architecture.

Geography

Newburyport is located at 42°48′45″N, 70°52′39″W (42.812391, -70.877440).GR1 According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 27.4 km² (10.6 mi²). 21.7 km² (8.4 mi²) of it is land and 5.7 km² (2.2 mi²) of it (20.77%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Newburyport was laid out on the elevated right bank of the Merrimack River between the river and Newbury marshes. The shipyards, now boatyards (and still vigorously active), extended along the bank at the edge of the river. They were connected by Merrimack Street, which ends upriver where the bank merges into bluffs covered with pine forest. Merrimack River watershed The Merrimack River (or Merrimac River, an earlier spelling that is sometimes still used) is a -long river in the Northeastern United States. ... Seal of Newbury, MA Newbury is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ...


Colonial residences extend up the bank from Merrimac Street to High Street (which is high) running parallel to it near the top of the ridge. The homes of the seafaring entrepreneurs line High Street. Many feature "widow's walks", structures on the roof where the residents could look for the return of sailing vessels. Nearly every home maintains a splendid flower garden, most dating to colonial times. Various cross streets, such as State Street, Green Street and Market Street, connect Merrimac Street and High Street.


The top of the ridge proved an ideal location for later institutions, such as Newburyport High School and nearby Anna Jaques Hospital. The ridge drops more sharply to the marsh on the other side. Along its margin a third parallel street developed, Low Street (which is low).


The river bank gradually descends to marshes at Joppa Flats beyond downtown Newburyport. The Plum Island Turnpike was pushed out over the marsh on a causeway to a narrow part of the Plum Island River just to the south of where it connects to the mouth of the Merrimack. A drawbridge was built there, the only access to the island by road. On the Newburyport side a small airport, Plum Island Airfield, was built at the edge of the marsh.


Demographics

Brown Square in 1913
Brown Square in 1913

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 17,189 people, 7,519 households, and 4,428 families residing in the city. The population density was 792.0/km² (2,050.3/mi²). There were 7,897 housing units at an average density of 363.8/km² (942.0/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.11% White, 0.42% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 0.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.88% of the population.The top 5 ethnic groups are .Irish - 25%[1] · English - 16% · Italian - 11% · French (except Basque) - 7% · German - 6% Image File history File links Brown_Square,_Newburyport,_MA.jpg‎ Brown Square, Newburyport, MA; from a 1913 postcard. ... Image File history File links Brown_Square,_Newburyport,_MA.jpg‎ Brown Square, Newburyport, MA; from a 1913 postcard. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 7,519 households out of which 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.1% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.90. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...

City Hall in c. 1910
City Hall in c. 1910

In the city the population was spread out with 20.7% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 86.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.9 males. Image File history File links Newburyport_City_Hall. ... Image File history File links Newburyport_City_Hall. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $58,557, and the median income for a family was $73,306. Males had a median income of $51,831 versus $37,853 for females. The per capita income for the city was $34,187. About .8% of families and .2% of the population were below the poverty line, including .3% of those under age 18 and .9% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

Since it's founding in 1851, Newburyport has been run by a mayor with a two-year term and an eleven member City Council. During the middle twentieth century Newburyport enjoyed a typical "small town" community, run, most notably, by city mayor and activist Ed Molin, who died in 2005. The current mayor of Newburyport is John Moak, and the next election year for mayor is 2007.


Education

According to the Sixty-Fifth Edition of The Clipper's Compass: A Student Handbook for 2005-2006, Newburyport High School was the result of the union in 1868 of the Latin and English High School (1831), later called the Brown High School (1851), the Putnam Free School (1848) and the Female High School (1843). After the union it was the Consolidated High and Putnam School, to become Newburyport High School in 1889.


The current building, designed by Edwin S. Dodge, occupies the previous Mount Rural on High Street. The school has been renovated a number of times. Today it is a fine-looking building with a grand entrance overlooking lawns sweeping down to High Street. The hill continues to descend to the river. The slope supports a residential area of colonial and nineteenth century buildings in good repair.


The school colors are crimson and old gold; the emblem is a clipper ship. There is a song, and a flag. The school has a student government and athletic programs.


Concerning accreditation the handbook says: "Newburyport High School is an accredited member of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and has met the evaluation requirements of the Commission on Public Secondary Schools."


The current site of Newburyport High School was purchased from Harvard University early in the 20th century. The original location still exists, in fully renovated condition, on the corner of Green and High streets.


Annual events

Yankee Homecoming

"Yankee Homecoming" is the annual festival celebrating the natives coming home to Newburyport. The event was initiated in 1957 by native Newburyporter George Cashman, who sought to stimulate the economy and lift the spirit of the citizens.


It lasts only a week. The first Sunday of the festival, known as "Olde Fashioned Sunday," is celebrated at the Bartlet Mall in Newburyport, and features many activities, including an art show, an appearance by the city's oldest fire engine, the "Neptune," and the participation of many local businesses. There is also an antique car parade. Each Yankee Homecoming features a grand marshal and numerous street vendors. A fire engine of the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service, England. ...


The festival includes nine days and over 200 events. There are concerts every night at Market Landing Park along with the "Annual Boat Parade." Other popular events include the Newburyport Lions' 10-mile and 5-kilometer road races, which run through the city's downtown streets and neighborhoods. There is also an amazing 45-minute fireworks show, and, most notably of all, the famous Yankee Homecoming parade on the last Sunday of the festival. For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ...


Newburyport's "Yankee Homecoming" is the 2nd oldest homecoming festival in the United States. Many charities raise their funds during this time. The Yankee Homecoming Festival celebrates it's 50th year in Newburyport this year.


Waterfront Concert Series

Held Friday evenings in Waterfront Park in downtown Newburyport, these free concerts are intended for all ages. The concerts are presented by the Newburyport Chamber of Commerce and the Waterfront Trust and are sponsored by a local insurance agency, Arthur S Page Insurance. Concert dates for 2007 are Fridays, July 13, 20, 27 and August 10 from 6-7:30 pm.


Newburyport Literary Festival

Held during the last weekend of April, The Newburyport Literary Festival was started in 2006 as a new effort by the city to increase interest in reading and literary arts. Many local authors are invited to sign and chat about their book, and schoolchildren create projects to show to an author that visits their school. Among the authors that regulary visit are Andre Dubus III and Tess Gerritsen. Andre Dubus III (b. ... Tess Gerritsen is a physician as well as an international and New York Times-bestselling thriller writer. ...


Points of interest

Atkinson Common in 1908

High Street is a remarkable street of fine old Federal-style houses, linking the Atkinson Common (1893-1894) with the Bartlett Mall, site of the Charles Bulfinch-designed Essex County Superior Courthouse (1805). Laid out in 1801, the Bartlett Mall was redesigned in the 1880s by noted Boston landscape architect Charles Eliot, with later improvements by Arthur Shurcliff. Image File history File links Atkinson_Common,_Newburyport,_MA.jpg‎ Atkinson Common, Newburyport, MA; from a 1908 postcard. ... Image File history File links Atkinson_Common,_Newburyport,_MA.jpg‎ Atkinson Common, Newburyport, MA; from a 1908 postcard. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Massachusetts State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Charles Eliot (1959-1897), noted American landscape architect. ... Arthur Asahel Shurcliff (1865 - 1957) was a noted American landscape architect. ...


First Presbyterian Church, Newburyport dates from 1756. The clock tower bell was cast by Paul Revere. One of the most famous individuals in 18th century America, evangelist George Whitefield, before dying in Newburyport in 1770, asked that his remains be buried under the pulpit of the "Old South" church and they are there to this day. Old South church in 2005. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 - September 30, 1770), was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ...

Meetinghouse of the First Religious Society (Unitarian), built 1801
Meetinghouse of the First Religious Society (Unitarian), built 1801

Some other points of interest are: the city's historic waterfront, Atwood Park (as known by School Street Park, founded by Aidan Tomlinson in 1927, on a grant from the SSTC) located in the south end of Newburyport, Market Square & Inn Street, and Cashman Park. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 301 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 1193 pixel, file size: 293 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 301 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 1193 pixel, file size: 293 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Cushing House Museum and Garden, Newburyport, Massachusetts. ... Maudslay State Park is a Massachusetts state park located in Newburyport. ...

Notable residents

Caleb Cushing (January 17, 1800–January 2, 1879) was an American statesman and diplomat who served as a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. ... Lord Timothy Dexter Lord Timothy Dexter (January 22, 1748- October 26, 1806), as he was sometimes termed by admiring contemporaries, was an American eccentric businessman who was peculiarly lucky and never bothered to learn to spell. ... Andre Dubus III (b. ... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805–May 24, 1879) was a prominent United States abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. ... Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. ... , Waltham, Massachusetts Francis Cabot Lowell (April 7, 1775 - April 10, 1817) was the American business man for whom the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, United States is named. ... John Lowell ( June 17, 1743– May 6, 1802) was an American lawyer and jurist from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 - July 16, 1960 ) was a 20th-century American novelist. ... Donald McKay (1810–1880) was a Canadian-born American designer and builder of sailing ships. ... Theophilus Parsons (February 24, 1750 - October 30, 1813), American jurist, was born in Byfield,_Massachusetts was the son of a clergyman. ... Timothy Pilsbury (April 12, 1789 - November 23, 1858) was a United States Representative from Texas. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Harriet Prescott Spofford Harriet Elizabeth Prescott Spofford (April 3, 1835–August 14, 1921) is a notable American writer remembered for her novels, poems and detective stories. ... Matthew Thornton Matthew Thornton (1714 – June 24, 1803), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Hampshire. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Currier (1902) page 267.

Bibliography

  • Smith, Mrs. E. Vale (1854). History of Newburyport; from the Earliest Settlement of the Country to the Present Time; with a Biographical Appendix, 828 pages.  Publisher not stated. Printer was Damrell and Moore, Boston. Other editions appear under Mrs. Smith's maiden name, Euphemia Vale Blake. This edition is downloadable from Google Books.
  • Hurd, Duane Hamilton, supervisor of compilation (1888). History of Essex County, Massachusetts, with Biographical Sketches of Many of the Pioneers and Prominent Men. Philadelphia: J. W. Lewis & Co.  Two volumes, 957 and 1173 pages. Newburyport is in Volume II; however, there are scattered facts throughout. The first half of Volume I is downloadable from Google Books. Republished (1992) by Higginson Book Company, ISBN083282450x. In that edition, Hurd is called an editor.
  • Currier, John J. (1906, 1909). History of Newburyport, Mass. 1764-1905 with Maps and Illustrations. Newburyport: John J. Currier, 766 and 679 pages.  Two volumes. Reprints and facsimiles exist.
  • Currier, John James (1902). History of Newbury, Mass. 1635-1902. Boston: Damrell & Upham.  Covers the early history of Newburyport before separation from Newbury. Downloadable from Google Books.

External links

Coordinates: 42.812391° N 70.87744° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
NewburyportGuide.com (722 words)
Newburyport occupies an exceptional location, in the northeastern corner of Massachusetts, along a ridge on the south bank of the lower Merrimack River.
Newburyport began to form as the shipbuilders and merchants rose to prominence in the port at the north end of the village, and by 1764 Newburyport broke away from the predominantly farming residents of Newbury to become a separate town.
Newburyport is currently a thriving community and is the commercial and cultural center of the lower Merrimack Valley.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m