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Encyclopedia > Newburgh (city), New York
City of Newburgh
Newburgh from the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge
Official seal of City of Newburgh
Seal
City of Newburgh (New York)
City of Newburgh
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 41°31′11″N 74°1′10″W / 41.51972, -74.01944
Country United States
State New York
County Orange
Settled 1709
Incorporated (village) 1800
Incorporated (City) 1865
Government
 - Type Council-manager
 - City Manager Jean McGrane
 - Mayor Nick Valentine
Area
 - Total 4.8 sq mi (12.4 km²)
 - Land 3.8 sq mi (9.9 km²)
 - Water 1 sq mi (2.5 km²)  20%
Elevation 128 ft (0 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 28,259
 - Density 7,436.5/sq mi (2,971.2/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP Code 12550
Area code(s) 845
FIPS code 36-50034
GNIS feature ID 0958498
Website: http://www.newburgh-ny.com

Newburgh is a city located in Orange County, New York, 60 miles (97 km) north of New York City, and 90 miles (140 km) south of Albany, on the Hudson River. In 1890, 23,087 people lived in Newburgh, New York; in 1900, 24,943; in 1910, 27,805; in 1920, 30,366; and in 1940, 31,883. The population was 28,259 at the 2000 census. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Newburgh is a town in Orange County, New York, United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 373 pixelsFull resolution (1134 × 529 pixel, file size: 570 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographed by Daniel Case 2006-08-07 from the walkway on the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge. ... The Newburgh-Beacon Bridge crosses the Hudson River in New York State and was opened to traffic on November 2, 1963 as a two-lane cantilever bridge. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the state. ... List of New York counties Map of the counties of New York State (click for larger version) Albany County: formed in 1683 as one of the original 12 counties. ... For other uses, see Orange County (disambiguation). ... A Municipal corporation is a legal definition for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... A Municipal corporation is a legal definition for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Orange County (disambiguation). ... -1... For other uses, see Albany. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


The City of Newburgh is along the Hudson River, between the Town of Newburgh and the Town of New Windsor.


Just east of the city, across the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge, lies the city of Beacon, New York. The Newburgh-Beacon Bridge crosses the Hudson River in New York State and was opened to traffic on November 2, 1963 as a two-lane cantilever bridge. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Country United States State New York County Dutchess Government  - Mayor Clara Lou Gould (R) Area  - City  4. ...


The City of Newburgh is surrounded on the north and the west by the Town of Newburgh, of which it was a part prior to 1865. Census estimates in 2005 indicate that the population of the City of Newburgh had dropped to 24,966 and increased in the Town of Newburgh to 30,508 thus making the Town more populous than the City for the first time in history.[1] Newburgh is a town in Orange County, New York, United States. ...


The entire southern boundary of the City of Newburgh is with the Town of New Windsor. Most of this boundary is formed by Quassaick Creek. New Windsor is a town in Orange County, New York, United States. ...

Contents

History

The area that became Newburgh was first explored by Europeans when Henry Hudson stopped by during his 1609 expedition up the river that now bears his name. He is supposed to have called the site "a pleasant place to build a town," although some later historians believe he may actually have been referring to the area where Cornwall-on-Hudson now stands. No portrait of Hudson is known to be in existence. ... Cornwall on Hudson is a village located in Orange County, New York. ...


The first settlement was made a century later, in 1709 by German Lutherans from the Rhenish Palatinate, who named it the Palatine Parish by Quassic. By 1750, most of the Germans had been replaced by people of English and Scottish descent, who in 1752 changed the name to the Parish of Newburgh (after Newburgh, Scotland). The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Palatinate (German: Pfalz), historically also Rhenish Palatinate (German: Rheinpfalz), is a region in south-western Germany. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Washington's Headquarters, preserved as a historic site
Washington's Headquarters, preserved as a historic site

Newburgh was the headquarters of the Continental Army from March, 1782 until the latter part of 1783. While the army was camped at Newburgh, some of its senior officers began the "Newburgh conspiracy" to overthrow the government. General George Washington was able to persuade his officers to stay loyal to him. The army was disbanded here in 1783. Washington received the famous Newburgh letter from Lewis Nicola proposing that he become king here. It drew a vigorous rebuke from Washington. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Washingtons Headquarters State Historic Site is a historic site on the central Hudson River in New York State, United States of America which preserves the last and longest serving headquarters of George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. ... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... The Newburgh Conspiracy was a plot hatched in 1783 near the end of the American Revolutionary War resulting from the fact that many of the officers and men of the Continental Army had not received pay for many years. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... In 1783, the Newburgh letter was sent to George Washington who was camped at Newburgh, New York; written for the army officers by Lewis Nicola, it proposed that Washington become the King of the United States. ... Lewis Nicola (1717-c. ... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ...

Woodcut of Newburgh skyline from Hudson in 1842, with Dutch Reformed Church prominent.
Woodcut of Newburgh skyline from Hudson in 1842, with Dutch Reformed Church prominent.

Newburgh was incorporated as a village in 1800 and chartered as a city in 1865. At the time of its settlement it was in Ulster County and was that county's seat. When Rockland County was split from Orange County in 1798, Newburgh and the other towns north of Moodna Creek were put in a redrawn Orange County. Newburgh thus lost its status as the county seat to Goshen. The former Ulster County courthouse still stands as Newburgh's old city courthouse building (currently used as municipal office space). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Dutch Reformed Church is one of the most prominent architectural landmarks in Newburgh, New York. ... Ulster County is a county located in the state of New York, USA. It sits in the states beautiful Mid-Hudson Region of the Hudson Valley. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland. ... Moodna Creek is a small tributary of the Hudson River that drains eastern Orange County, New York. ... Goshen is a village located in Orange County, New York. ...


Newburgh became quite prosperous during the Gilded Age that followed. With its situation on the Hudson River, midway between New York City and Albany, it became a transportation hub and an industrial center. Its industries included manufacturings of cottons, woolens, silks, paper, felt hats, baking powder, soap, paper boxes, brick, plush goods, steam boilers, tools, automobiles, coin silver, bleach, candles, waterway gates, ice machines, pumps, moving-picture screens, overalls, perfumes, furniture, carpets, carburetors, spiral springs, spiral pipe, shirt waists, shirts, felt goods, lawn mowers; shipyards; foundries and machine shops; tanneries; leatherette works; plaster works. <math> </math></math> The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ... A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head; a kind of headgear. ... [[Image:PIPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPEPbe caused by ingredients like buttermilk, lemon, yoghurt, citrus, or honey. ... For other uses, see Soap (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Steam (disambiguation). ... A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. ...

Lower Broadway
Lower Broadway

It has been a city with many distinctions. It is home to the first Edison power plant and thus was the first American city to be electrified and have street lights. In 1915 it became one of the first American cities to delegate routine governmental authority to a city manager. Broadway, which at 132 feet (40 m) in width is one of the widest streets in the State of New York [1], runs through the city culminating with views of the majestic Hudson River. Newburgh was one of the first cities in the country to fluoridate its water [2]. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... A high pressure sodium vapor street lamp from Australia. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ...


Newburgh played a pivotal role in television history. In October, 1939, RCA chose to test-market televisions in Newburgh, which was within range of the television signal of RCA's experimental station W2XBS. 600 sets were sold in Newburgh at a deep discount. The test-marketing campaign's success encouraged RCA to go forward with developing the new medium. Additionally, with consumer television production ceasing during World War II, those Newburgh households which purchased televisions during 1939 and 1940 were among the few to enjoy television (albeit with a greatly reduced programming schedule) during the war. [2] This article is about the former RCA Corporation. ... WNBC may mean the following broadcast stations in the city of New York: WNBC-TV 4 WNBC AM 660, now WFAN WNBC-FM 97. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Newburgh was hit hard economically by several factors in late 20th century, and the subsequent decline was precipitous. The industrial base of the city declined as industries relocated operations south or to other locations with cheaper labor costs and lower taxes. The Hudson River, which previously served as the main means of transporting goods, lost much of its shipping traffic to trucking. The city's trolley system was shut down in 1924, in favor of buses. [3] The nation moved to the automobile for transportation and as with many other cities there was a resulting migration to the suburbs. In 1963 the Newburgh Beacon Bridge [4] was opened spanning interstate 84 across the Hudson River, bypassing the Newburgh waterfront. The ferry closed down soon thereafter -- it was not revived until 2005 -- and the waterfront area declined rapidly. In the late 1960s, the Mid Valley Mall opened outside of the city center, while the city continued to lose its previously well regarded retail sector along Water Street and Broadway. The West New York, here docked at Newburgh. ...


In the early 1960s, the city's response to the economic decline was an ambitious urban renewal plan.The city's historic waterfront area, an area composed of several square blocks which included numerous historically significant buildings, was completely demolished. Residents were relocated, or were supposed to be relocated, to newer housing projects around Muchattoes Lake in the city's interior. Urban Renewal redirects here. ... For other uses, see Demolition (disambiguation). ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ...


A grand complex that was planned for the urban renewal area was never built when state and federal spending began to dry up after the 1973 oil crisis. To this day, the blocks which slope down to the river remain open, grassy slopes, offering sweeping views of the Hudson but generating no property taxes for the city. [5]Public sentiment is mixed on whether they should be built on again at all, and the city's view-protection ordinances make it less likely. Below, the waterfront was developed in the late 1990s after the city was once again able to secure grants from the state's Environmental Protection fund for riprap(a type of stone) to stabilize the shoreline. Urban Renewal redirects here. ... The 1973 oil crisis began in earnest on October 17, 1973, when the members of Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arab members of OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) announced, as a result of the ongoing Yom Kippur War, that they would no longer ship petroleum... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... Riprap (also known as rip rap or shot rock) is rock or other material used to stabilize shore. ...


In the early 1960s, city manager Joseph Mitchell and the council attracted nationwide attention and the admiration of political conservatives when they attempted to require welfare recipients to pick up their payments at police headquarters. Mitchell later announced a program aimed largely at blacks on welfare, who many in the community blamed for its economic problems. The program would have denied welfare payments to all after three months except the aged, the blind and the handicapped. Those affected would have largely been single mothers of young children, the only category in which blacks were predominant. The program also would have denied payments to single mothers who had working relatives living in the city. After opposition by both state and federal officials, the program created a national controversy and never went into effect (See 'The Despised Poor'(Beacon Press) by Joseph P. Ritz.) Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ...


Along with the failed urban renewal, the 1970s in Newburgh were also marked by race riots and other tensions. The last big one, in 1978, led African-American students at Newburgh Free Academy, the city's public high school, to boycott classes and ultimately to a major reorganization of the school system. A race riot or racial riot is an outbreak of violent civil unrest in which race is a key factor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


These tensions flared up again during the city's hotly contested 1995 mayoral election. Allegations of electoral fraud had dogged the city's first African-American woman mayor, Audrey Carey, since her 1991 victory in a four-way race. Supporters of Republican candidate Regina Angelo (now a Democrat herself) alleged that many registered voters in neighborhoods Carey had carried heavily used false addresses. In response, four years later deputy sheriffs were stationed at polling places and challenged voters to provide proof of residency and identity. Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Electoral fraud is illegal interference with the process of an election. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Although she won, Carey's supporters claimed that the deputy sheriffs had singled out minority voters for such challenges and accused the Republicans of voter suppression. These tensions were only aggravated when the council selected the county's Republican chairman at the time, Harry Porr, who had initiated the challenges, as the new city manager. Animosity between Carey and Porr and their respective supporters dominated city politics in the late 1990s, until Porr was fired and Carey defeated in 1999 (Porr would later be hired and fired again). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Newburgh in the early 21st century is more racially diverse than it used to be, as a growing Latin immigrant (mainly of Mexican decent) population complements the city's sizable African American contingent. Economic development is a major concern, but poorly envisioned, as the good jobs once found in the local manufacturing sector have not been replaced. Pockets of poverty persist in the city, often mere blocks away from its many historical and architectural landmarks (some of which are themselves in serious need of repair). In addition to this, the city has been facing issues regarding illegal immigration like many other cities across the United States, ranging from overcrowded apartment buildings to mild racial conflict. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Immigration is the movement of people into one place from another. ... Mexican may have several meanings. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Economic development is the development of economic wealth of countries or regions for the well-being of their inhabitants. ... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... Taj Mahal Big Ben Saint Basils Cathedral Azadi Square in Tehran For other senses of this word, see landmark (disambiguation). ... Illegal immigration to the United States refers to the act of foreign nationals voluntarily resettling in the United States in violation of U.S. immigration and nationality law. ...

These homes on Chambers Street show the two faces of contemporary Newburgh: both historic, one newly renovated, the other exemplifying urban blight.
These homes on Chambers Street show the two faces of contemporary Newburgh: both historic, one newly renovated, the other exemplifying urban blight.

Newburgh's preservation history can be traced all the way back to 1850 when Washington's Headquarters was designated a state historic site, the first in the country. Newburgh's Historical Society was founded in 1884. It purchased the David Crawford House, its museum, in 1958, saving it from being demolished to make way for a parking lot for a funeral home. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Symptoms of urban blight: graffiti-covered abandoned and deteriorating buildings and garbage-strewn vacant lots. ... The Washingtons Headquarters State Historic Site is a historic site on the central Hudson River in New York State, United States of America which preserves the last and longest serving headquarters of George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. ... A historic site is a location where pieces of history have been preserved. ... For other uses, see Demolition (disambiguation). ...

The Dutch Reformed Church, a National Historic Landmark.
The Dutch Reformed Church, a National Historic Landmark.

The city's modern preservation efforts began when the Dutch Reformed Church, a Greek Revival structure designed by Alexander Jackson Davis, was slated for demolition as part of urban renewal after the congregation left the decaying building in 1967. The movement to stop it led to the development of a historic district, now the second largest in New York State. The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places three years later, and in 2001 became the city's second National Historic Landmark after Washington's Headquarters. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1932x2576, 2277 KB) Photographed by Daniel Case on 2006-02-27. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1932x2576, 2277 KB) Photographed by Daniel Case on 2006-02-27. ... The Dutch Reformed Church is one of the most prominent architectural landmarks in Newburgh, New York. ... Personal residence of Catherine the Great Greek Revival was a style of classical architecture which became fashionable in Europe in the 18th century, and in the United Kingdom and United States in the early 19th century. ... The Federal Customs House (now Federal Hall, New York City, with Ithiel Town, 1833 – 42 Alexander Jackson Davis (A.J. Davis) (New York City July 24, 1803 – January 14, 1892) was the most successful and influential American architect of his generation. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


The city was designated a Preserve America community in 2005 and it also signed an agreement with the State Office of Historic Preservation as a Certified Local Government community. Its East End Historic District, recognized by the National Register of Historic Places as that and the Montgomery-Grand-Liberty Streets Historic District, has the most contributing properties of any historic district in the state. The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation operates (as of 2004): 168 state parks 35 state historic sites 76 developed beaches 53 water recreational facilities 27 golf courses 39 full service cottages 818 cabins 8355 campsites 18 nature centers 1350 miles of trails See List of... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... A historic district in the United States is a group of buildings, properties or sites that have been designated by one of several entites on different levels as historically or architecturally significant. ...


While the city's historic architecture has attracted a stable core of preservation-minded community activists willing to spend the time and money renovating houses, much work remains to be done. Part of the problem lies in the fact that the city government warehouses a large stock of in rem properties within its Historic District that have fallen into disrepair as a result of its inability to secure them. Jurisdiction in rem (Latin, power about or against the thing) is a legal term describing the power a court may exercise over property (either real or personal) or a status against a person over whom the court does not have in personam jurisdiction. Jurisdiction in rem assumes the property or...


Despite progress from the early 1990s, poverty remains a major (and visible) problem. The 2000 census found that two of the city's five census tracts are among the poorest in the entire state. In 2004 the state declared it one of the state's five most "stressed" cities, based on a mix of statistics like families headed by single mothers, abandoned buildings, unemployment, residents under the poverty line and adults without a high school diploma. [6] Local citizens and city officials blame the county's Department of Social Services for making problems worse by using the city as a dumping ground for its poorest clients. County officials respond that they are only sending people where housing costs are the cheapest. 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... A census tract, census area, or census district is a particular community defined for the purpose of taking a census. ...

Downing Park, the city's largest
Downing Park, the city's largest

Geography

The city is on the west bank of the Hudson River. Next to it, the land rises at first sharply to a bluff, where many historic homes are located due to the sweeping views it offers of the Hudson Highlands to the south, Mount Beacon to the east and the bridge to the north; then more gradually to a relatively level western half. There are some notable hills in outlying areas, such as Overlook Terrace in the city's southeast corner and Mount St. Mary's at the northeast. , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... Wind Gate, the northern entrance to the Hudson Highlands, as seen from Newburgh. ...


The lowest elevation in the city is sea level along the river; the highest is roughly 690 feet (210 m) on Snake Hill along the city's southern boundary with the Town of New Windsor. New Windsor is a town in Orange County, New York, United States. ...


Newburgh is located at (41.503193, -74.019636)[3].


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.8 sq mi (12.4 km²). 9.9 km² (3.8 sq mi) of it is land and 2.5 km² (1.0 sq mi) of it (20.08%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


New York State Route 32 and U.S. Route 9W pass through the city. New York State Route 17K and New York State Route 207 also reach their eastern termini within city limits. Interstate 84 passes just north of the city and the New York State Thruway is not far to the west. New York State Route 32 is a New York State Route that travels from Monroe, NY to Hudson Falls, NY, a distance of 176 miles (282 km). ... U.S. Route 9W is a U.S. Highway that provides a western loop of U.S. Highway 9. ... Junction Location Orange NY-17 0. ... Junction Location Orange US-6 0. ... Interstate 84 (abbreviated I-84) is an interstate highway extending from Dunmore, Pennsylvania (near Scranton, Pennsylvania) at an intersection with Interstate 81 to Sturbridge, Massachusetts at an intersection with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90). ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ...


Demographics

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 28,259 people, 9,144 households, and 6,080 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,856.2/km² (7,393.6/sq mi). There were 10,476 housing units at an average density of 1,058.8/km² (2,740.9/sq mi). The racial makeup of the city was 42.33% White, 32.96% Black or African American, 0.71% Native American, 0.76% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 18.11% from other races, and 5.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 36.30% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 9,144 households out of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.1% were married couples living together, 25.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.5% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.97 and the average family size was 3.62. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 33.2% under the age of 18, 12.7% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 16.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $30,332, and the median income for a family was $32,519. Males had a median income of $26,633 versus $21,718 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,360. About 23.0% of families and 25.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.3% of those under age 18 and 16.1% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

Newburgh has five elected officials, a mayor and four city councilmembers, all elected at-large to four-year terms, staggered so that the mayor and two councilmembers are up for re-election one year and two others two years later. Currently, all four councilmembers are elected at-large, or citywide; in November 2007, Newburgh voters will decide on whether to split Newburgh into eight wards and elect one councilmember from each ward. [7] A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single multimember constituency. ...


The mayor accepts all legal process and often serves as the symbolic head of the city, but other than that has no special powers or role. The city manager, who appoints all other city officials subject to council approval, serves at their pleasure.


City managers are frequently hired amidst high hopes, yet minimal criteria, and mutual resolve to do better; then fired, almost ritually and sometimes spectacularly. As of 2006, the city has had four mayors and five managers (three if two who served twice aren't counted) in the last decade.


A recurring complaint has been that, rather than taking direction from council, some city managers have exploited divisions among members to turn it into a rubber stamp for their policies and actions and render themselves unaccountable. There have been proposals to change the situation by assigning council members to wards or eliminating the city manager's position. But they have been perceived as politically motivated, and thus have not been adopted. However, the current mayor, Nick Valentine campaigned in 2003 as being the "last mayor". Rubber stamp, is a political metaphor referring to an institution that has little power and rarely disagrees with more powerful organs, though usually it formally has much greater power. ...


Jean McGrane, the first woman ever to hold the position, is the current City Manager.


Politics

Newburgh maintains a relatively strong local Republican Party, despite demographics and urban trends favoring Democrats. Valentine, several other recent and current mayors and councilmembers and Assemblyman Thomas Kirwan, a resident, are Republicans. Currently, though, Democrats hold all of the other four council seats. GOP redirects here. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of New York. ...


An independent documentary was made in 2004 about the mayoral race in Newburgh, called Saving Newburgh. The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


Famous Newburghians

  • Coulton Waugh, artist (of Dickie Dare comic strip) and mapmaker, who created a Newburgh pictorial map
  • Saul Williams, poet, actor and hip hop artist, b.1972]
  • Andrew Jackson Downing, (architect and landscape designer, b. 1815)
  • George Inness, (artist and member of the Hudson River school of painting, b. 1825)
  • Ellsworth Kelly, (artist, b. 1923)
  • Geraldine Ferraro, (member of Congress and vice presidential candidate, b. 1935)
  • James Patterson, (bestselling thriller novelist, b. 1947)
  • Rob Bell, (MLB pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles)
  • Saigon (rapper)
  • Rob Affuso (drummer), Skid Row rock band
  • Orlando Nomad, well known raconteur, bibliophile and gourmand
  • William S. Hart, film actor-director
  • Tony Davilio, songwriter ("Ooh Child") and musical director of John Lennon's Double Fantasy
  • Chris Hanson, (lead singer) rock band Perfect Thyroid
  • Corey Glover, (lead singer) rock band Living Colour
  • Jeff Klein, member of rock band Twilight Singers and Gutter Twins
  • J Rock 1990's hip hop artist, b. 1971
  • Lauren WilliamsVideo vixen

Dickie Dare was a comic strip created for Associated Press Features by Milton Caniff. ... Saul Stacey Williams (born February 29, 1972) is most known for his blend of poetry and hip-hop. ... Andrew Jackson Downing (born October 31, 1815 - died July 28, 1852) was an American landscape designer and writer from Newburgh, New York and the editor and publisher of The Horticulturist magazine. ... George Inness, before 1867 Train in Lackawanna valley, 1855 Lake of Albano, Italy, 1869 George Inness was a United States painter, born in Newburgh, New York on May 1, 1825, and who died at Bridge of Allan, Scotland, on August 3, 1894. ... Thomas Cole (1801-1848) View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm or The Oxbow 1836 The Hudson River School was a mid-19th century American art movement by a group of landscape painters, whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism. ... Ellsworth Kelly (b. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. ... For other people named James Patterson, see James Patterson (disambiguation). ... Rob Bell (born January 17, 1977 in Newburgh, New York) is a Major League/Minor League baseball player. ... Brian Daniel Carenard (born June 1, 1977), better known by his stage name Saigon, is an American rapper. ... Rob Affuso (born Robert James Affuso, on March 1, 1963) is a heavy metal drummer, best known as ex-drummer of Skid Row. ... Wiliam Surrey Hart Movie poster for Harts 1916 western The Aryan in which he played a white (Anglo-Saxon) member of a Mexican gang, having turned against his own people. ... Christopher David Hanson(Born:October 5, 1976) is a National Football League punter for the Jacksonville Jaguars. ... Corey Glover (born November 6, 1964 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American musician. ... Japanese rock is the Japanese form of rock and roll music, often abbreviated to J-Rock or jrock, as J-Pop and jpop are used as an abbreviation of Japanese Pop. ... Lauren Williams (born May 19, 1980) is currently playing wide receiver for the Oakland Raiders in the National Football League. ...

Literature

  • E. M. Ruttenber, History of Orange County with History of the City of Newburgh, (Newburgh, 1876)
  • J. J, Nutt, Newburgh: Her Institutions, Industries, and Leading Citizens, (Newburgh, 1891)
  • L. P. Powell, (editor) Historic Towns of the Middle States, (New York, 1899)
  • J.P. Ritz, "The Despised Poor, Newburgh's War on Welfare", (Beacon Press, 1966)

Education

Newburgh is served by the Newburgh Enlarged City School District [8].


Transportation

Stewart International Airport serves the city. Stewart International Airport (IATA: SWF, ICAO: KSWF) is located near Newburgh, New York, in the southern Hudson Valley, 55 miles (88. ...


Media

Radio stations WGNY (AM) and WGNY-FM are licensed to Newburgh. WGNY-FM is a radio station located in Newburgh, New York. ...


References

  1. ^ Orange County Ready Reference, issued by the office of the Orange County Clerk, 2007
  2. ^ von Schilling, James, The Magic Window: American Television, 1939-1953 New York: Haworth Press, 2003
  3. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  • Newburgh (city), New York is at coordinates 41°30′12″N 74°01′11″W / 41.503193, -74.019636 (Newburgh (city), New York)Coordinates: 41°30′12″N 74°01′11″W / 41.503193, -74.019636 (Newburgh (city), New York)
New York, the Empire State has been at the center of American politics, finance, industry, transportation and culture since it was created by the Dutch in the 17th century. ... This article discusses the early American patriot group. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Nathan-hale-cityhall. ... The Liberty Boys erected several poles with banners to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp Act. ... Combatants Vermont, Connecticut Great Britain Commanders Ethan Allen, Benedict Arnold William Delaplace Strength 83 48 Casualties None 48 captured The capture of Fort Ticonderoga was an event early in the American Revolutionary War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Charles Lee Sir William Howe, Lord Cornwallis Strength 19,000 regulars and militia 25,000 soldiers, 10,000 seamen The New York and New Jersey campaign was a series of engagements in the American Revolutionary War between British forces under General Sir... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Israel Putnam William Howe, Charles Cornwallis, Henry Clinton Strength 11,000-13,000 unknown, nearly 20,000 (about 10,000 of which were militia ) 22,000 (including 9,000 Hessians) Casualties 1,719 total (312 dead, 1,407 wounded, captured... Prison Ship Martyrs Monument Program of the Dedicatory Ceremonies of the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, November 14, 1908 Erected in Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn, New York. ... Combatants American milita British Army Commanders William Douglas William Howe Strength 900 4,000 Casualties 60 killed or wounded, 320 captured 12 killed The Landing at Kips Bay was a British maneuver during the New York Campaign in the American Revolutionary War. ... The Battle of Harlem Heights was a skirmish in the New York Campaign of the American Revolutionary War. ... The Great Fire was a devastating fire that burned through the night of September 21 – September 22, 1776 on the west end of what then constituted New York City at the southern end of the island of Manhattan. ... For other persons named Nathan Hale, see Nathan Hale (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Valcour Island, 11 October 1776, also known as Battle of Valcour Bay, was a naval engagement fought on Lake Champlain in a narrow strait between the New York mainland and Valcour Island. ... The Battle of Pells Point, also known as the Battle of Pelham, was a skirmish during the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 14,500 men 14,000 men Casualties 300 killed and wounded 313 killed and wounded Battle of White Plains Historic Site : George Washingtons HQ The Battle of White Plains was an inconclusive meeting on October 28, 1776 in the... Combatants United States Britain Hessian Army Commanders George Washington Robert Magaw William Howe Wilhelm Knyphausen Strength 2,900 8,000 Casualties 53 killed, 96 wounded, & 2,818 captured 78 killed, 374 wounded Fort Washington was a fort located at the upermost tip of Manhattan, New York overlooking the Hudson River... Meigs Raid (also known as the Battle of Sag Harbor) was guerrilla raid by American forces on the British at Sag Harbor, New York on May 23, 1777 during the American Revolutionary War in which six British were killed and 90 captured while the Americans suffered no casualties. ... Commanders Horatio Gates John Burgoyne Template:Campaignbox American Revolutionary War: Campaign of 1777 The campaign of 1777 was a series of battles in 1777 during the American Revolutionary War for control of the Hudson River. ... Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders John Burgoyne General Arthur St. ... Combatants Continental army Great Britain Brunswick-Luneburg Commanders Seth Warner Simon Fraser Baron von Riedesel Strength 1,200 men 850 men 180 Germans Casualties 41 killed, 96 wounded, 234 captured 60 killed, 148 wounded The Battle of Hubbardton was an engagement in the Saratoga campaign of the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants British United States Commanders Lt Col. ... Combatants Tryon County militia 40 Oneida Indians Hanau Jager detachment Kings Royal Regiment of New York Butlers Rangers Seneca Indians Natives of the Seven Nations of Canada: Mohawks, Abenakis, Algonquins, Nipissings and Hurons Commanders Nicholas Herkimer † Sir John Johnson, John Butler, Chief Joseph Brant Strength 800 450+ Casualties... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ... Combatants Continental Army Patriot militia Britain Hessian Army Commanders Benedict Arnold Daniel Morgan Henry Dearborn Ebenezer Learned Enoch Poor Simon Fraser Baron von Riedesel James Inglis Hamilton Casualties 300 killed or wounded 600 killed or wounded The Battle of Freemans Farm (September 19, 1777) was the first engagement in... The Battle of Bemis Heights on October 7, 1777 is also known as the 2nd Battle of Saratoga since it was the second and last major engagement in the Battle of Saratoga of the American Revolutionary War. ... The Culper Ring was organized by Benjamin Tallmadge under the orders of General George Washington in the summer of 1778. ... The Battle of Cobleskill (Cobleskill massacre) occurred on May 30-June 1, 1778, in Cobleskill, New York. ... USMA redirects here. ... Incident in Cherry Valley - fate of Jane Wells from the original picture by Alonzo Chappel by Thomas Phillibrown, engraver. ... Combatants United States British Commanders Anthony Wayne Henry Johnson Strength 1,350 700 Casualties 15 killed, 83 wounded 63 killed, 70 wounded, 543 prisoners The Battle of Stony Point was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. ... The Sullivan Expedition, also known as the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition, was a campaign led by Major General John Sullivan and General James Clinton against Loyalists (Tories) and the four nations of the Iroquois who had sided with the British in the American Revolutionary War. ... The Battle of Newtown (29 August 1779) was the only major battle of the Sullivan Expedition, an armed offensive led by Gen. ... Elijah Churchill was a 32-year old carpenter from Enfield, Connecticut who entered the 8th Connecticut Regiment as a private on July 7, 1775. ... Major John André John André (May 2, 1750 - October 2, 1780) was a British officer hanged as a spy during the American Revolutionary War for an incident in which he assisted Benedict Arnolds attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British. ... HMS Culloden was a Royal Navy third-rate ship of the line built in Deptford in 1776. ... Belligerents United States Kingdom of France Great Britain German Mercenaries Commanders George Washington Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau François de Grasse Charles Cornwallis # Charles O’Hara # Strength 19,300 soldiers (10,800 French 8,500 Americans) 24 French warships 375 guns (see below) 7,500 240 guns Casualties and losses... The Washingtons Headquarters State Historic Site is a historic site on the central Hudson River in New York State, United States of America which preserves the last and longest serving headquarters of George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. ... In 1783, the Newburgh letter was sent to George Washington who was camped at Newburgh, New York; written for the army officers by Lewis Nicola, it proposed that Washington become the King of the United States. ... Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when the last vestige of British authority in the United States — its troops in New York — departed from Manhattan. ... The current Fraunces Tavern restaurant on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan 1. ...

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