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Encyclopedia > Newark, Delaware
Main Street is the commercial heart of Newark. It is adjacent to the University of Delaware.
Main Street is the commercial heart of Newark. It is adjacent to the University of Delaware.

Newark is a city in New Castle County, Delaware, 12 miles (19 km) west by south of Wilmington. According to 2006 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 30,060.[1] Newark is the home of the University of Delaware. Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1036 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1036 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... New Castle County is the northern-most county of the three counties in the state of Delaware. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... Nickname: Chemical Capital of the World Motto: A Place To Be Somebody Coordinates: County New Castle County incorporated 1739 Mayor James M. Baker (D) Area    - City 44. ... The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ...


Newark is pronounced /nuɑɹk/ and not /nuɚk/ (not like Newark, New Jersey). Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area    - City 67. ...

Contents

History

Newark was founded by Scots-Irish and Welsh settlers in 1694. The town received a charter from George II of Great Britain in 1758, thus officially establishing the town. Scots-Irish Americans are descendants of the Scots-Irish immigrants who came to North America in the late 17th and 18th centuries. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff (Caerdydd) Largest city Cardiff (Caerdydd) Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Schools have played a significant role in the history of Newark. A grammar school, founded by Francis Alison in 1743, moved from New London, Pennsylvania to Newark in 1765, becoming the Newark Academy. Among the first graduates from the school included three signers of the Declaration of Independence: George Read, Thomas McKean, and James Smith. // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... George Read, Sr. ... Thomas McKean Thomas McKean (March 19, 1734–June 24, 1817) was the second President of the United States in Congress assembled, from July 10, 1781, until November 4, 1781. ... James Smith (about 1719 – July 11, 1806), was a signer to the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Pennsylvania. ...


The state granted a charter to a new school in 1833, which was called Newark College. Newark Academy and Newark College joined together in following year, becoming Delaware College. The School was forced to close in 1859, but was resuscitated eleven years later under the Morill Act when it became a joint venture between the State of Delaware and the School's Board of Trustees. In 1913, pursuant to legislative Act, it came into sole ownership of the State of Delaware. Later, it would be renamed the University of Delaware in 1921. 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ...


Newark received a license to hold semi-annual fairs and weekly markets for agricultural exchange in 1758. A paper mill, the first sizeable industrial venture in Newark, was created in 1798. Methodists built the first church in 1812 and the railroad arrived in 1837. 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Geography

Location of Newark, Delaware

Newark is located at 39°40′45″N, 75°45′29″W (39.679111, -75.758040)GR1. Adapted from Wikipedias DE county maps by Bumm13. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 23.1 km² (8.9 mi²), all land. Originally surrounded by farmland, Newark is now surrounded by housing developments in some directions, although farmland remains just over the state lines in Maryland and Pennsylvania. To the north and west are small hills, but south and east of the City, the land is flat (part of Newark falls in the Piedmont geological region and part of the City is in the Coastal Plain geological region, as is the majority of the land in the State of Delaware). The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Despite the fact that Newark is located roughly halfway between Philadelphia (approximately 45 miles away) and Baltimore (approximately 55 miles away) and is part of densely populated New Castle County, there is a large amount of public parkland surrounding the City. To the South is Iron Hill Park (part of the New Castle County Park System), to the west (in Cecil County, MD) is Fair Hill Natural Resources Management Area, and to the North is White Clay Creek State Park and White Clay Creek Preserve (in Chester County, PA). Also nearby is Middle Run Natural Area, which is part of the New Castle County Park System. These parks provide ample hiking, mountain biking, and horse back riding opportunities. White Clay Creek State Park and Fair Hill Natural Resources Management Area are comprised of land formerly owned by the DuPont family that was later ceded to the states of Delaware and Maryland, respectively.


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 28,547 people, 8,989 households, and 4,494 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,235.7/km² (3,198.6/mi²). There were 9,294 housing units at an average density of 402.3/km² (1,041.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.29% Caucasian, 6.00% African American, 0.16% Native American, 4.07% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.86% from other races, and 1.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.53% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget, is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


Of the 8,989 households, 20.7% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.0% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.91. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 12.5% under the age of 18, 43.6% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 14.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 23 years. For every 100 females there were 85.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.3 males.


The median household income is $48,758, and the median family income is $75,188. Males had a median income of $45,813 versus $33,165 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,376. About 4.1% of families and 20.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.0% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

The current mayor of Newark is Vance A. Funk, III. The deputy mayor is Jerry Clifton. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Mayor of the city of Newark, Delaware. ...


City Council Members:

  • Paul J. Pomeroy - District 1
  • Jerry Clifton - District 2
  • Doug Tuttle - District 3
  • David J. Athey - District 4
  • Frank J. Osborne, Jr. - District 5
  • Stu Markham - District 6

Education

Public education in Newark is handled by the Christina School District and the Red Clay Consolidated School District. Newark is home to the University of Delaware. Within the city limits is Newark High School, which is the third largest public high school in the state. It has served the community since 1893. The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... Newark High School is a public high school in Newark, Delaware and is one of three high schools within the Christina School District. ...


Description of Newark

Newark has a central area which is compact and walkable, consisting of the university, Main Street, and surrounding residential neighborhoods. The city limits also include less densely developed areas with shopping centers, suburban developments, and apartment complexes; these areas are more isolated and somewhat less pedestrian friendly, although all developed areas in Newark are served by sidewalks. Newark was a small town until about World War II, but grew rapidly in the 1950s and 1960s. Several of the City's neighborhoods were built during this era, such as Devon, Nottingham Green, and Fairfield (some of which was also built during the 1970s). Because of its later growth compared to other comparably sized towns in the region, Newark has fewer pre World War II era houses, especially outside of the downtown area.


The center of Newark is a lively place, due in large part to the University and its students. Much of the city's economy revolves around the presence of the University. During the summer, when there are fewer students living in Newark, the town is much quieter. Local young people consider Main Street a popular "hangout." Newark's Main Street has also long served as a place for teenagers and young adults to "go cruising," repeatedly driving down Main Street. In the late 1980s, this led to an ordinance forbidding driving down Main Street more than a certain number of times in a row. In an effort to limit cruising, parking was also forbidden on much of Main Street after certain hours on weekends. Although many students at the University consider the cruisers to be "townies," many of them hail from surrounding rural communities, such as Cecil County, MD, Southern New Castle County, DE, and Southern Chester County, PA.


Many manufacturing industries that once existed in Newark have moved elsewhere. Some mills along White Clay Creek like the National Vulcanized Fiber factory have been turned into shops, restaurants, and condos. The large factory that once dominated South Chapel Street (Continental Fiber) was torn down and replaced by student apartments. Redevelopment is also planned for the Curtis Paper Mill, a closed plant now owned by the city. As is the case in much of Delaware, there has been some concern for the presence of toxic chemicals on recently re-developed land. There is a Daimler-Chrysler Plant on the southwestern side of the city. The factory was originally built to manufacture military vehicles, but has been owned by Chrysler since the 1950s. Musician Bob Marley worked at the factory for a short time in the 1960s when he was living with his mother in Wilmington. It is possible that Marley's song "Nightshift" was influenced by his work at the factory. The mill seen from the south The Curtis Paper Mill (also known as the Nonantum Mill) is a factory located near White Clay Creek in Newark, Delaware. ...


Newark seems to have an unusually large (and vocal) population of the Song Sparrow. Binomial name Melospiza melodia (Wilson, 1810) The Song Sparrow, Melospiza melodia, is a medium-sized sparrow. ...


Public Transportation in Newark

Newark's access to public transportation is outstanding for a community of its size, although this public transportation is underutilized. Newark is served by DART First State buses, routes #6, 16, 33, 34, and 65, providing service to Wilmington, Christiana Mall, and Elkton, MD. Most routes travel through the university campus and also stop at the rail station, discussed below. There is also a Unicity bus, run jointly through the city and the University, free for everyone to ride, which acts as a community circulator. The University of Delaware also operates a bus system, available and free to all students and those associated with the university. DART First State is the primary public transportation system that operates throughout Delaware, USA. Although most of its routes run in and around Wilmington and Newark in New Castle County, DART also serves Dover (in Kent County), and Georgetown in Sussex County, and has one route running into New Jersey... Nickname: Chemical Capital of the World Motto: A Place To Be Somebody Coordinates: County New Castle County incorporated 1739 Mayor James M. Baker (D) Area    - City 44. ... Elkton is a town in Cecil County, Maryland, United States. ...


Newark has a Rail Station, (Map, via Google Maps) serviced by both SEPTA and AMTRAK. Newark is the last stop on the R2 (SEPTA) line, one of the farthest points out on the system. SEPTA service to Newark involves 4 trains both directions with the morning and evening rush hours, weekdays only. Fare is $5.50 one way to downtown Philadelphia and $2.50 to Wilmington. The AMTRAK service in Newark is less practical; there is only one train per day in each direction. However, the Acela Express stops in nearby Wilmington, Delaware. This is the Amtrak station in Delaware. ... For the abbreviation SEPTA, see SEPTA. A septum, in general, is a wall separating two cavities or two spaces containing a less dense material. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida Amtrak (AAR reporting marks AMTK and AMTZ) is the brand name of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation, created on May 1, 1971 as the United States intercity passenger... The R2 is a route of the SEPTA Regional Rail commuter rail system in the Philadelphia area. ... Nickname: Chemical Capital of the World Motto: A Place To Be Somebody Coordinates: County New Castle County incorporated 1739 Mayor James M. Baker (D) Area    - City 44. ...


Noted Residents, Past and Present

Wilbur Louis Adams (October 23, 1884 – December 4, 1937) was an American lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... Lewis Heisler Ball (September 21, 1861 – October 18, 1932) was an American physician, United States Representative and a United States Senator from the state of Delaware. ... David P. Buckson David Penrose Buckson (born July 25, 1920) is an American lawyer and politician from Camden, Kent County in the State of Delaware. ... Christopher A. Coons is a lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... Charles Tarzan Cooper (August 30, 1907 in Newark, Delaware - December 19, 1980 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was a pro basketball player. ... Harry Coover (b. ... :This is an article about the golfer. ... Mayor of the city of Newark, Delaware. ... Richard Howell (Newark, Delaware, in 1753; died in Trenton, New Jersey, 28 April, 1802) was a state Governor of New Jersey from 1794 to 1802. ... K.C. (Kurt Charles) Keeler (born July 26, 1959) is the current head football coach at the University of Delaware in Newark. ... Judith LeClair (b. ... Jack A. Markell (about 1961–) is an American businessman and politician from Newark, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... Kevin Ford Mench (born January 7, 1978 in Wilmington, Delaware) is a Major League Baseball player for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... David Paul Roselle is an American mathematician and academic. ... Harold R. Tubby Raymond (born November 14, 1926) was University of Delaware head football coach (1966-2001) and College Football Hall of Fame inductee (2003). ... John Wales (July 31, 1783–December 3, 1863) was a United States Senator representing Delaware in the 19th Century. ... John G. Johnny Weir (born July 2, 1984, in Coatesville, Pennsylvania) is the reigning three-time US National Champion in figure skating. ... Shien Biau Woo (a. ... Bernard Hopkins (born January 15, 1965) —nicknamed The Executioner— is a professional boxer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, regarded by experts to be one of the best middleweight fighters of all time. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29 [1] [2], 1953) is an American documentary filmmaker. ... Nathan Gray on stage. ... Richard Joseph Gannon (born December 20, 1965 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former American football quarterback, who achieved most of his success late in his career with the Oakland Raiders in the National Football League. ... Reese Witherspoon and Ryan Phillippe Ryan Phillippe (pronounced Fil-lih-pee) (born September 10, 1974 in New Castle, Delaware) is an American actor. ...

Points of interest

The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... The University of Delaware Botanic Gardens are botanical gardens and an arboretum located on the campus of the University of Delaware, in Newark, Delaware. ... The Delaware Sängerbund (German for Singers Alliance) is a German-American club located near Newark, Delaware. ...

See also

  • Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research

Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research, Inc. ...

References

  1. ^ Annual Estimates of the Population for All Incorporated Places in Delaware (CSV). 2005 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (June 21, 2006). Retrieved on November 21, 2006.

The comma-separated values (or CSV) file format is a delimited data format that has fields separated by the comma character and records separated by newlines. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

State of Delaware
Topics Counties • Hundreds • Cities & Communities • Rivers • Transportation • Landmarks
Governors • Lt. Governors • General Assembly • Courts • U.S. Senators • U.S. Representatives
Government • History • EducationReligion • Communications • Business

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Newark Delaware Apartments - Pine Brook Apartments In Newark Delaware (337 words)
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Five minutes from downtown Newark and accessible to all major highways, residents at our Newark Delaware apartment rentals are truly "in the center of it all." Southeastern Pennsylvania, South Jersey, Maryland, and of course, all of Delaware, are within easy reach.
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