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Encyclopedia > New York Times

The New York Times is an internationally known daily Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. A newspaper is a lightweight and disposable publication (more specifically, a periodical), usually printed on low-cost paper called newsprint. It may be general or special-interest, and may be published daily, weekly, biweekly, monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly. General-interest... newspaper published in New York, New York redirects here. For alternate meanings, see New York, New York (disambiguation). Midtown Manhattan, 2003. New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the largest city in the United States, and the worlds most important center for global finance and communications. The city... New York City and distributed in the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States and many other nations worldwide. It is owned by The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York, New York. In its very first edition on September 18, 1851, the... The New York Times Company, which also publishes other major newspapers like The International Herald Tribune (or IHT) is fully owned by the New York Times, which along with its own staff journalists and news agencies supplies it with newsn and features. Founded on October 4, 1887 by New York Herald owner James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the company is based in Neuilly... International Herald Tribune and The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. It is the larger of the two big Boston dailies with a daily circulation of 467,745 as of September 2002. The other is the Boston Herald. The Globe was... The Boston Globe, among 40 other newspapers.

Contents

History

Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2100 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. Please see its image description page on the Commons. Photo by alterego. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the...
Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2100 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. Please see its image description page on the Commons. Photo by alterego. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the... Enlarge
The New York Times' main offices in New York, New York redirects here. For alternate meanings, see New York, New York (disambiguation). Midtown Manhattan, 2003. New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the largest city in the United States, and the worlds most important center for global finance and communications. The city... New York City.

The New York Times was founded on September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). There are 104 days remaining. September Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23... September 18, Years: 1848 1849 1850 - 1851 - 1852 1853 1854 Decades: 1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1851 in art 1851 in literature 1851 in music 1851 in rail transport 1851 in science 1851 in sports List of state leaders in 1851 List of... 1851 by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones. Raymond was also a founding director of the Associated Press logo The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency that claims to be the worlds oldest and largest. The AP is a cooperative owned by its contributing newspapers, who both contribute stories to it and use material written by its staffers. As of 2004, AP... Associated Press in 1856. It was originally intended to publish every morning except on Sundays; however, during the Military history of the United States Conflict American Civil War Date 1861– 1865 Place Principally in the southern United States; also in eastern, central and southwestern regions Result Defeat of seceding CSA Battles of the American Civil War Combatants United States of America USA flag 1861– 1863. 34... Civil War the Times started publishing Sunday issues along with other major dailies. It won its first The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in the United States. The prize was established by Joseph Pulitzer, a Hungarian-American journalist and... Pulitzer Prize for news reports and articles about Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. Battle aftermath. Remains of the Chateau Wood World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations, and the War to End All Wars, was a world conflict occurring from 1914 to... World War I in 1918. In 1919 it first made its trans-atlantic delivery to London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. Founded as Londinium, the capital of... London. A crossword began to appear in 1942 as a feature. It bought the classical station WQXR is a radio station that broadcasts from New York City on 96.3 megahertz FM, and is Americas most listened-to classical music station. It was officially founded in 1936, when the station moved to 96.3 FM, and The New York Times bought it in 1944. Click... WQXR in 1942. The fashions section started in 1946. The Times also started an international edition in 1946, but stopped publishing it in 1967 and joined with the owners of the Herald Tribune and Alternative meaning: The Washington Post (march) Washington Post logo Screenshot from Washington Post website The Washington Post is the largest and oldest newspaper in Washington, D.C. It gained worldwide fame in the early 1970s for its Watergate investigation by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein which played a major role... The Washington Post to publish the The International Herald Tribune (or IHT) is fully owned by the New York Times, which along with its own staff journalists and news agencies supplies it with newsn and features. Founded on October 4, 1887 by New York Herald owner James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the company is based in Neuilly... International Herald Tribune in The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Paris. The Op-Ed section started appearing in 1970. More recently, in 1996 The New York Times went online, giving access to readers all over the world on the Web at www.nytimes.com. A new headquaters for the newspaper, a skyscraper designed by Renzo Piano (born September 14, 1937) is a famous architect. He was born in Genoa, Italy and still maintains a home and office (Building Workshop) there. He was educated and subsequently taught at the Milan Politecnico. From 1965 to 1970 he worked with Louis Kahn and with Makowsky. He worked... Renzo Piano, is currently under construction at 41st Street and 8th Avenue in For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). Manhattan is an island bordering the lower Hudson River. It is one of the five boroughs that comprise the City of New York. The borough is coterminous with New York County and includes the Island of Manhattan, as well as several other smaller islands... Manhattan.


Circulation

For the year ending Dec. 26, 2004, the reported circulation data for The New York Times were:


1,124,700 Weekday [1] (http://www.nytco.com/company-properties-times.html#nyt)


1,669,700 Sunday [2] (http://www.nytco.com/company-properties-times.html#nyt)


Infrastructure

The New York Times is based in New York, New York redirects here. For alternate meanings, see New York, New York (disambiguation). Midtown Manhattan, 2003. New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the largest city in the United States, and the worlds most important center for global finance and communications. The city... New York City. It has 16 news bureaus in the New York region, 11 national news bureaus and 26 foreign news bureaus. [3] (http://www.nytco.com/company-properties-times.html#nyt)


The New York Times is printed at the following sites:


Ann Arbor, MI; Austin, TX; Atlanta, GA; Billerica, MA; Canton, OH; Chicago, IL; College Point, NY; Concord, CA; Dayton, OH (Sunday only); Denver, CO; Fort Lauderdale, FL; Gastonia, NC; Edison, NJ; Lakeland, FL; Phoenix, AZ; Minneapolis, MN; Springfield, VA; Kent, WA and Torrance, CA. [4] (http://www.nytco.com/company-properties-times.html#nyt)


Ownership

Adolph Simon Ochs (March 12, 1858 - April 8, 1935) was an American Jewish reporter of Bavarian background, who purchased The New York Times in 1896, and rescued it from near oblivion, increasing its readership from 9,000 at the time of his purchase to 780,000 by the 1920s. His... Adolph Ochs acquired the Times in Years: 1893 1894 1895 - 1896 - 1897 1898 1899 Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s - 1890s - 1900s 1910s 1920s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1896 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1896, and under his guidance the newspaper achieved an international scope, circulation, and reputation. In Years: 1894 1895 1896 - 1897 - 1898 1899 1900 Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s - 1890s - 1900s 1910s 1920s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1897 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 2 Births... 1897 he coined the paper's current slogan "All The News That's Fit To Print," widely interpreted as a jibe to competing papers in New York (the The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. The newspaper was unsuccessful until it was purchased by Joseph Pulitzer in 1883. Nellie Bly, a journalist on the title became the first investigative journalist, often working undercover. As a publicity stunt for the paper... New York World and the The New York Journal American was a newspaper (at the time called the New York Journal) purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895. Mr. Hearst, the priveleged and entitled son of a wealthy mining tycoon, was already established in the newspaper business in San Fransisco and ventured to New York... New York Journal American) that were known for Yellow journalism is a type of journalism in which sensationalism triumphs over factual reporting. This may take such forms as the use of colorful adjectives, exaggeration, a careless lack of fact-checking for the sake of a quick breaking news story, or even deliberate falsification of entire incidents. The sensationalized... yellow journalism. After relocating the paper's headquarters to a new tower on For the film of this name, see 42nd Street (film). For the Broadway musical of the same name, see 42nd Street (musical). 42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square... 42nd Street, the area was named Times Square Times Square, named after the one-time headquarters of The New York Times, is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, which centers on 42nd Street and Broadway. It consists of the blocks between Sixth and Ninth Avenue from east to west and 39th and... Times Square in 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1901 1902 1903 - 1904 - 1905 1906 1907 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1904 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and... 1904. Nine years later, the Times opened an annex at 229 43rd Street, their current headquarters, later selling Times Tower in 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year - i.e., one that looked the same upside down - since 1881, and the last until 6009. Years: 1958 1959 1960 - 1961 - 1962 1963 1964 Decades: 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s... 1961. The newspaper is currently owned by The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. The company was founded by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones in New York, New York. In its very first edition on September 18, 1851, the... The New York Times Company, in which descendants of Ochs, principally the Sulzberger family, maintain a dominant role.


Major Sections

The newspaper is organized in to the following three sections:

1. News 
Includes This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you might want to go back and fix it to point directly to the intended page. Between nations or encompassing several nations. See... International, National is the Japanese brand under which Matsushita products are sold. In the US, they are sold under the Panasonic brand. See also Nationality ... National, This article deals with the U.S. state. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation) State of Washington (Flag of Washington) (Seal of Washington) State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th... Washington, Historically, the term business referred to activities or interests. By extension the word became (as recently as the 18th century) synonymous with an individual commercial enterprise. It has also taken on the more general meaning of a nexus of commercial activities. People establish businesses in order to perform economic activities... Business, Technology ( Gr. τεχνολογια < τεχνη craftsmanship + λογος word, reckoning + the suffix ια) has more than one definition. One is the development and application of tools, machines, materials and processes that help to... Technology, For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). Science is both a process of gaining knowledge, and the organized body of knowledge gained by this process. The scientific process is the systematic acquisition of new knowledge about a system. This systematic acquisition is generally the scientific method, and the... Science, Health can be defined negatively, as the absence of illness, functionally as the ability to cope with everyday activities, or positively, as fitness and well-being (Blaxter 1990). In any organism, health is a form of homeostasis. This is a state of balance, with inputs and outputs of energy and... Health, A sport consists of a normal physical activity or skill carried out under a publicly agreed set of rules, and with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of skill, or some combination of these. The difference of purpose is what characterises sport... Sports, New York Region, Education encompasses teaching and learning specific skills, and also something less tangible but more profound: the imparting of knowledge, good judgement and wisdom. Education has as one of its fundamental goals the imparting of culture from generation to generation (see socialization). Contents // 1 Overview 2 History of education 2.1... Education, Composite satellite image showing the progress of a hurricane weather system approaching the east coast of America Weather comprises all the various phenomena that occur in the atmosphere of a planet. On Earth the regular events include wind, storms, rain, sleet, hail, and snow, which occur in the troposphere or... Weather, An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper and usually including a short biography. The obituary usually contains names of the subjects close relatives and possibly time and place of a funeral. Because of the short time between the notification of... Obituaries, and Corrections.
2. Opinion 
Includes An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news. Editorials are not written by the regular reporters; rather, they are collectively authored by a group of individuals called the editorial board. They represent the... Editorials, Op-Eds and Letters to the Editor.
3. Features 
Includes The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. The correct title is aRts. aRts, which stands for analog Real time syntheziser, is an application that simulates an analog synthesizer under KDE/Linux. One key component of aRts is the soundserver which mixes several soundstreams in realtime... Arts, A book is a collection of leaves of paper, parchment or other material, bound together along one edge within covers. A book is also a literary work or a main division of such a work. A book produced in electronic format is known as an e_book. In library and information... Books, For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Movies, For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle —... Theater, Travel is the transport of people on a trip or journey. Reasons for travel include: Tourism—travel for recreation. This may apply to the travel itself, or the travel may just be the necessary investment to arrive at a desired location. Visiting friends and family Trade Commuting–going... Travel, NYC Guide, Dining & This article is about the beverage. See WINE for an article about the software of the same name. Wine is an alcoholic beverage resulting from the fermentation of grapes or grape juice. The word comes from Greek Fοινος through Latin vinum, (both wine and the... Wine, Home & Garden, A fashion consists of a current (constantly changing) trend, favoured for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons. Contents // 1 Fields prone to fashions 2 Fashion and variation 3 Fashion and the process of change 4 Fashion and status 5 Classification of fashions 6 See also 6.1 Further... Fashion & Clothing, see Fashion Writing, see style guide Flower part, see Flower Style (manner of address) Chinese courtesy name, see zi Web design, see Cascading Style Sheets Sundials, see sundial See also: Wikipedia:Manual of Style This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Style, Crossword is a game. Modern crosswords take the form of a square grid of black and white squares; the aim is to fill the white squares (lights) with letters, forming words reading across and down, by solving clues which yield the words. The black squares (commonly called blanks) have no... Crossword/Games, A cartoon is a form of art with diverse origins and even more diverse modern meanings. In its historical original meaning, a cartoon is a full-size drawing made on paper as a study for a further artwork, such as a painting. However, cartoons were typically used in the production... Cartoons, This article is about the magazine as a published medium. For other meanings, see magazine (disambiguation) A collection of magazines Magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. Magazines are typically published weekly, biweekly, monthly, or quarterly, with a date on the cover... Magazine, and Week in Review

Awards

The New York Times has won 90 Pulitzer Prizes, the most prestigious award for journalism in the US given away each year by Columbia University Motto In lumine tuo videbimus lumen (In thy light we shall see light) Established 1754 School type Private President Lee C. Bollinger Location New York City, New York, USA Campus Urban, 32.6 acres (132,000 m ) Morningside Enrollment 7,114 undergraduate, 14,692 graduate, professional, and medical... Columbia University, including a record 7 in 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Years: 1999 2000 2001 - 2002 - 2003 2004 2005 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s... 2002. More recently, in 2004 the Times won a Pulitzer award for a series written by David Barstow and Lowell Bergman was a television producer for the CBS news magazine 60 Minutes and is best known for investigating the tobacco industry, and specifically utilizing scientist Jeffrey Wigand of Brown & Williamson as a source. He was portrayed in the movie The Insider by Al Pacino. Bergman is currently (2004... Lowell Bergman on employers and workplace safety issues.


Famous Mistakes

In 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Years: 1917 1918 1919 - 1920 - 1921 1922 1923 Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1920 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology... 1920, a New York Times editorial ridiculed Robert Goddard Robert Hutchins Goddard (October 5, 1882 – August 10, 1945) was one of the pioneers of modern rocketry. Though his work in the field was revolutionary, he was often ridiculed for his theories, which were ahead of their time. Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, and became interested... Robert Goddard and his claim that a A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. Often the term rocket is also used to mean a rocket engine. In military terminology... rocket would work in space:

That Professor Goddard, with his "chair" in Clark College and the countenancing of the Smithsonian Institution, does not know the relation of action to reaction, and of the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react--to say that would be absurd. Of course he only seems to lack the knowledge ladled out daily in high schools.

In 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969, days before Apollo 11 Mission Insignia Mission Statistics Mission Name: Apollo 11 Call Sign: Command module: Columbia Lunar module: Eagle Number of Crew: 3 Launch: July 16, 1969 13:32:00 UTC Kennedy Space Center LC 39A Lunar Landing: July 20, 1969 20:17:40 UTC Sea of Tranquility 0° 40 26... Apollo 11's landing on the moon, the newspaper published a tongue-in-cheek correction:

Further investigation and experimentation have confirmed the findings of Isaac Newton in the 17th century, and it is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum as well as in an atmosphere. The Times regrets the error. [5] (http://www.time.com/time/time100/scientist/profile/goddard.html)

Allegations of Bias

The Times has been criticized for allowing Exxon Mobil Corporation Type Public Slogan Founded 1911 (in 1999, company took on current name) Location HQ in Irving, Texas Key people Lee R. Raymond: Chairman and CEO; Rex W. Tillerson: President; Edward G. Galante, Stuart R. McGill, J. Stephen Simon: Senior Vice Presidents Employees 88,300 Products Petrochemical Web... Exxon-Mobil Corporation to run a regular paid "advertorial" commentary piece on its editorial page, although the practice is common in other U.S. newspapers. Some studies have shown that the Times selection of op-ed pieces and letters to the editor seem to "bracket" their editorial position, making the editorials appear to be moderate.


Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of Conservative political parties in various countries. All of these are primarily (though not necessarily exclusively) identified with the political right. While the intellectual roots of conservatism date back centuries... Conservatives believe that the Times' hard news and soft news reportage have a consistent and pronounced liberal slant, particularly on social issues. Additionally, the intermix of political commentary with art criticism in the Arts section of the paper is pointed to as evidence of bias. For example, A. O. Scott's For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... film reviews sometimes contain barbs directed at social conservatives, and Frank Rich's Arts columns regularly attack Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of Conservative political parties in various countries. All of these are primarily (though not necessarily exclusively) identified with the political right. While the intellectual roots of conservatism date back centuries... conservatives.


Conversely, many In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. (Note: the words liberal or liberalism can have different meanings in different countries and may also vary with the political background of the user. Therefore, the terms have... liberals and This article is part of or related to the Progressivism series Progressivism Progressive Movement Progressive Party Economic Progressivism Educational Progressivism Political Progressivism Social Progressivism Progressivism or political progressivism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of progressive political parties in various... progressives believe that the Times' hard reporting of foreign policy issues tends to be biased towards right-wing views. In the film Manufacturing Consent movie poster Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media (1992) is a documentary film that explores the political life and ideas of Noam Chomsky, world-renowned linguist, intellectual, and political activist. Created by two Canadian independent filmmakers, Mark Achbar and Peter Wintonick, it expands on the ideas of... Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media, Noam Chomsky at Harvard in 2002. Getty Images/William B. Plowman Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an Institute Professor of linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and creator of the Chomsky hierarchy, a classification of formal languages. His works in generative linguistics contributed significantly to the... Noam Chomsky's allegations of the paper's deliberate downplaying The Republic of Indonesia, the worlds largest archipelago, is located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the most populous Muslim-majority nation in the world and the fourth most populous overall. It has had free elections since the Indonesian 1998... Indonesia's brutal invasion and occupation of The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... East Timor are extensively illustrated as a major example of this.


Some progressives believe that the Times' reporting of economic policy issues tends to be biased towards upper-middle class or upper-class concerns over the concerns of the poor or working-class.


Third, some Times political reporters, such as Elisabeth Bumiller and Adam Nagourney, have been accused by liberals of covering politics in a shallow and unreflective fashion that (perhaps inadvertently) benefits conservatives.


Additionally, The New York Times has not supported a This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. For the older Republican Party, which is now known as the Democratic-Republican Party, see Democratic-Republican Party (United States). The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Modern Republican party logo... Republican Party candidate for president since Order: 34th President Vice President: Richard Nixon Term of office: January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961 Preceded by: Harry S. Truman Succeeded by: John F. Kennedy Date of birth: October 14, 1890 Place of birth: Denison, Texas Date of... Dwight D. Eisenhower in the 1950s. It has endorsed JFK redirects here. For other uses, see JFK (disambiguation) John Fitzgerald Kennedy Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth... John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Baines Johnson ( August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. After serving a long career in U.S. legislatures, Johnson became the Vice President under John F. Kennedy ( 1961– 1963) and later ascended to the 36th Presidency ( 1963– 1969... Lyndon B. Johnson, Hubert Humphrey Order: 38th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 1965 - January 20, 1969 Followed: Lyndon Johnson Succeeded by: Spiro Agnew Date of Birth May 27, 1911 Place of Birth: Wallace, South Dakota Wife: Muriel Fay Buck Profession: pharmacist, teacher Political Party: Democrat President: Lyndon Johnson Hubert Horatio Humphrey... Hubert Humphrey, George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922 in Avon, South Dakota) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate most noted for his opposition to the Vietnam War. He is currently serving as the United Nations global ambassador on hunger. Biography Born and raised in South Dakota, McGovern... George McGovern, James Earl Carter, Jr. Order: 39th President Term of Office: January 20, 1977–January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic Vice... Jimmy Carter, Walter F. Mondale Order: 42nd Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 1977 - January 20, 1981 Followed: Nelson Rockefeller Succeeded by: George H. W. Bush Date of Birth January 5, 1928 Place of Birth: Ceylon, Minn. Wife: Joan Adams Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Democrat President: Jimmy Carter Walter Frederick Fritz... Walter Mondale, Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American politician born in Brookline, Massachusetts, to Greek-immigrant parents. Contents // 1 Early Career 2 Presidential Candidate 2.1 Views on capital punishment 2.2 Prison furlough program issue 2.3 Public relations failure 2.4 Election defeat 3 Subsequent Activities... Michael Dukakis, William Jefferson Clinton Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope... Bill Clinton and John Kerry Date of Birth: Saturday, December 11, 1943 Place of Birth: Aurora, Colorado Marriage: (1) Julia Thorne, divorced (2) Teresa Heinz Kerry Children: Alexandra Kerry, daughter Vanessa Kerry, daughter H. John Heinz IV, stepson André Heinz, stepson Christopher Heinz, stepson Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Democratic Party John Forbes Kerry... John Kerry.


In the op-ed section, the Times' regular columnists — who operate largely independently of the rest of the paper, and are subject to relatively little editorial oversight — have a mixed range of political orientations. However, some claim that this mix is unbalanced, and that this imbalance demonstrate a liberal bias at the newspaper. The 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004 roster of regular columnists range in political position from Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a columnist for The New York Times who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1999 for her series of columns on the Monica Lewinsky scandal. She was born in Washington D.C. the youngest of five children in a Catholic family where her father... Maureen Dowd, Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, who has written several books and who currently (as of 2005) is a columnist for The New York Times. Krugman is probably best known to the public as an outspoken and formidable critic of the economic and general policies... Paul Krugman, and Bob Herbert on the In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word... left, to Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and columnist, presently working as an Op-Ed writer for the New York Times whose column concentrates on foreign affairs. He is known for advocating a compromise peace between Israel and Palestine or the Palestinians; for modernization of the... Thomas Friedman and Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times whose specialty is East Asian affairs, especially those of the Peoples Republic of China. He is the author of several books, including China Wakes: The struggle for the soul of a rising power (1994) Thunder from the East... Nicholas Kristof in the center-left, to David Brooks (born August 11, 1961) is a columnist for The New York Times who has become one of the prominent voices of conservative politics in the United States. David Brooks was born in Toronto and grew up in New York City in Stuyvesant Town. He graduated from the University... David Brooks, formerly of The Weekly Standard is an American Conservative political magazine published 48 times per year. It made its debut on September 17, 1995, and it is owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. It is viewed as a leading outlet of the influential neoconservative movement. Its current editors are William Kristol... The Weekly Standard magazine, on the center-right and William L. Safire (born December 17, 1929), columnist for The New York Times and author of fifteen books, writes syndicated op-ed pieces, generally with a conservative viewpoint. Since 1979, he has written On Language, a weekly column in the New York Times Magazine covering grammar, etymology, new or unusual... William Safire (retired) on the In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. It is usually, but not always, associated with conservatism, and (from the 20th century onwards) may be associated... right. However, attempts to place these columnists' positions on a one-dimensional American A political spectrum is a way of comparing or visualizing different political positions, by placing them upon one or more geometric axes. Contents // 1 Determining political spectra 2 Left and Right 2.1 Multiplicity of interpretation of the left-right axis 2.2 Historical origin of the terms 3 Alternative... political spectrum does not completely characterize their actions or views. For example, Dowd strongly criticized President Clinton; Krugman (a professional An economist is someone who studies Economics. See also List of economists. The Economist is also a news journal published in London. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you... economist) spoke as an economic centrist before he began systematically criticizing the The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. George Walker Bush Order: 43rd President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–Present Predecessor: Bill Clinton Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: July 6, 1946 Place of Birth: New Haven, Connecticut... George W. Bush administration; and Safire has criticized the This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. President Bush signs USA Patriot Act, October 26, 2001 The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act, H.R. 3162... Patriot Act.


Riccardo Puglisi from the The London School of Economics and Political Science, often called the London School of Economics or the LSE, is one of the worlds major specialist universities in economics and social sciences. It may have had a larger impact on the shape of the modern political world than any other... London School of Economics has written an empirical paper about the editorial choices of the New York Times from 1946 to 1994, entitled, "Being the New York Times: The Political Behaviour of a Newspaper" (December 6, 2004). [6] (http://ssrn.com/abstract=573801) He finds that the Times displays Democratic Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. In this context the term often refers to the field element of resistance movements that opposed Nazi domination in several... partisanship, with some A watchdog originally referred to a dogs job, but now has been used in additional contexts with the same implication of watching or safeguarding: For the dogs job, see guard dog. In computer programming there are watchdog timers. A watchdog is also an informal name given to consumer... watchdog aspects. For example, during presidential campaigns, the paper systematically gives more coverage to Democratic topics ( Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. Examples include the right to vote and anti_discrimination laws. Civil rights movements usually want equal protection of the laws for minorities, as well as new laws outlawing discrimination and its vestiges. Civil rights... civil rights, Health care or healthcare is one of the worlds largest and fastest growing professions. As a general term, it refers to the delivery of medical services by specialist providers, such as midwives, doctors, nurses, home health aides, vaccination technicians and physicians assistants. Usually such services receive payment from... health care, Labour (or labor) can mean any one of the following things: Physical or mental work; exertion. Such work considered as supplying the needs of a community. A particular task, especially of a difficult nature. See: Labor (philosophy) In economics, one of the three main factors of production. The term labor... labor, Social welfare can be taken to mean the welfare or well-being of a society. in economics, the utility of people considered in aggregate. For social welfare in the economic sense, see welfare economics and social welfare function. the provision of a wide range of social services, for the benefit... social welfare), but only so when the The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. For example, in the 2004 Russian presidential election, Vladimir Putin was the incumbent, because he was the current president. In many jurisdictions and situations, incumbents have structural advantages over challengers during elections. The timing of elections may be... incumbent president is a Republican.


Times self-examination of bias

In summer 2004, the Times' An ombudsman is a government official charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. The term arose from its use in Sweden, with the Parliamentary ombudsman instituted in 1809 to safeguard the rights of citizens by establishing a supervisory agency independent... ombudsman, Daniel Okrent (born 1948) is an American writer, editor and baseball fan. Biography Okrent graduated in 1969 from the University of Michigan. Most of his career has been spent as an editor, at publishers including Alfred A. Knopf, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Esquire Magazine, New England Monthly, Life Magazine, and TIME... Daniel Okrent, wrote a piece on the Times' alleged liberal bias. He concluded that the Times did have a liberal bias in coverage of certain social issues, Same-sex marriage Performed nationwide in: Belgium Netherlands Performed in some regions in: Canada: BC, MB, NL, NS, ON, QC, SK, YT United States: MA Articles on other countries and regions: Australia Canada: AB, NB, NT, NU, PE France Ireland Romania South Africa Spain United Kingdom United States: CA See... gay marriage being the example he used. He claimed that this bias reflected the paper's cosmopolitanism, which arose naturally from its roots as a hometown paper of New York City (in the United States, cosmopolitan urban populations, like New York City's, tend to be more socially liberal than the mean).


To date, Okrent has not commented extensively on general biases in coverage of "hard news" matters, such as fiscal policy, foreign policy, or civil liberties. However, he has noted that the paper's coverage of the Iraq war was, among other things, insufficiently critical of the George W. Bush administration (see below).


Recent Controversies

In 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003, the Times admitted to ... journalism fraud committed over a span of several years by one of its reporters, Jayson Blair (born 1976) is a former New York Times reporter considered to have been a star reporter, until he admitted to journalistic fraud when the San Antonio Express-News caught him plagiarizing one of its stories. Blair submitted his resignation letter to the Times on May 1, 2003, and... Jayson Blair, and the general professionalism of the paper was questioned, though Blair immediately resigned following the incident. Questions of Affirmative action (US English), or positive discrimination (British English), is a policy or a program providing advantages for people of a minority group who are seen to have traditionally been discriminated against. This consists of preferential access to education, employment, health care, or social welfare. It is also known as... affirmative action in journalism were also raised, since Blair was African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. The majority of African Americans are of African, European and Native American ancestry. Terms for African... African American. Several top officials, including the chief of its editorial board, also resigned their posts following the incident.


On May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). There are 219 days remaining before the end of the year. May Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14... May 26, 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004, the Times published another significant admission of journalistic failings, admitting that its flawed reporting during the buildup to war with The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia. It shares borders with Kuwait and Saudi-Arabia to the south, Jordan to the west, Syria to the north-west, Turkey to the north, and Iran to the east. Its current leadership... Iraq helped promote the misleading belief that Iraq possessed large stockpiles of Weapons of Mass Destruction is also the name of rapper Xzibits 2004 album. Weapons of mass destruction By Type Biological weapons Chemical weapons Nuclear weapons Radiological weapons By Country Brazil Canada China (PRC) France India Iran Iraq Israel North Korea Pakistan Russia South Africa Taiwan (ROC) United Kingdom United... weapons of mass destruction. [7] (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/26/international/middleeast/26FTE_NOTE.html) While this "From the Editors" piece didn't mention names, a large part of the incriminated articles had been written by Times reporter Judith Miller (born 1948 in New York City) is an investigative journalist for the New York Times. She shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for her coverage of al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden. Miller, who started at the Times in 1977, has come under criticism for her reporting on... Judith Miller.


A second self-criticism by Okrent went further. "The failure was not individual, but institutional," he wrote. "War requires an extra standard of care, not a lesser one. But in the Times's WMD coverage, readers encountered some rather breathless stories built on unsubstantiated 'revelations' that, in many instances, were the anonymity-cloaked assertions of people with vested interests. Times reporters broke many stories before and after the war - but when the stories themselves later broke apart, in many instances Times readers never found out. ... Other stories pushed The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. The Pentagon is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense. It was dedicated on January 15, 1943 and it is the worlds largest office building. Those who work within its walls often simply... Pentagon assertions so aggressively you could almost sense Epaulette [pronunciation: ĕp-ǝ-lĕt] is a French word meaning verbatim, little shoulders (epaule, referring to shoulder), often describes the shoulder decorations such as insignia or rank, especially in military or other organizations worn on the shoulder. Before rank insignia were devised, the rank of an officer... epaulets sprouting on the shoulders of editors. ... The aggressive journalism that I long for, and that the paper owes both its readers and its own self-respect, would reveal not just the tactics of those who promoted the WMD stories, but how the Times itself was used to further their cunning campaign." [8] (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/30/weekinreview/30bott.html)


Employees

Executive editors

  • Turner Catledge ( 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 July 1.8 August 1.9 September 1.10 October 1.11 November... 1964- 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Undated 1.2 January 1.3 February 1.4 March 1.5 April 1.6 May 1.7 June 1.8 July 1.9 August 1.10 September 1... 1968)
  • James Reston ( 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Undated 1.2 January 1.3 February 1.4 March 1.5 April 1.6 May 1.7 June 1.8 July 1.9 August 1.10 September 1... 1968- 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969)
  • position vacant ( 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969- 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1973 1974 1975 - 1976 - 1977 1978 1979 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1976 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology... 1976)
  • Abe M. Rosenthal (born May 2, 1922), born in the Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada, was a New York Times executive editor and columnist (1987-1999) and New York Daily News columnist (1999-2004). He joined the New York Times in 1943 and worked for the Times for 56 years... Abe Rosenthal ( For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). Years: 1974 1975 1976 - 1977 - 1978 1979 1980 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1977 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1977- 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1983 1984 1985 - 1986 - 1987 1988 1989 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1986 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1986)
  • Max Frankel ( 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1983 1984 1985 - 1986 - 1987 1988 1989 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1986 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1986- 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. Years: 1991 1992 1993 - 1994 - 1995 1996 1997 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1994 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1994)
  • Joseph Lelyveld ( 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. Years: 1991 1992 1993 - 1994 - 1995 1996 1997 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1994 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1994- 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. By strict interpretation of the Gregorian Calendar, 2001 is also the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd millenium. Popular culture, however, often views the year 2000 as holding this distinction. 2001 is also the year... 2001)
  • Howell Raines was Executive Editor of The New York Times from 2001 until his resignation following the Jayson Blair scandal in 2003. He currently writes political commentary for British newspaper The Guardian. His career in journalism began in 1964 as a reporter for the Tuscaloosa News and WBRC-TV in... Howell Raines ( 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. By strict interpretation of the Gregorian Calendar, 2001 is also the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd millenium. Popular culture, however, often views the year 2000 as holding this distinction. 2001 is also the year... 2001- 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003)
  • Bill Keller (born June 18, 1949) is executive editor of The New York Times. After graduating from Pomona College in 1970 where he began his journalistic career by founding an independent newspaper called The Collage, he was a reporter in Portland with The Oregonian, the Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report, and... Bill Keller ( 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003- )

Columnists

  • David Brooks (born August 11, 1961) is a columnist for The New York Times who has become one of the prominent voices of conservative politics in the United States. David Brooks was born in Toronto and grew up in New York City in Stuyvesant Town. He graduated from the University... David Brooks
  • Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a columnist for The New York Times who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1999 for her series of columns on the Monica Lewinsky scandal. She was born in Washington D.C. the youngest of five children in a Catholic family where her father... Maureen Dowd
  • Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and columnist, presently working as an Op-Ed writer for the New York Times whose column concentrates on foreign affairs. He is known for advocating a compromise peace between Israel and Palestine or the Palestinians; for modernization of the... Thomas L. Friedman
  • Bob Herbert
  • Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times whose specialty is East Asian affairs, especially those of the Peoples Republic of China. He is the author of several books, including China Wakes: The struggle for the soul of a rising power (1994) Thunder from the East... Nicholas D. Kristof
  • Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, who has written several books and who currently (as of 2005) is a columnist for The New York Times. Krugman is probably best known to the public as an outspoken and formidable critic of the economic and general policies... Paul Krugman
  • William L. Safire (born December 17, 1929), columnist for The New York Times and author of fifteen books, writes syndicated op-ed pieces, generally with a conservative viewpoint. Since 1979, he has written On Language, a weekly column in the New York Times Magazine covering grammar, etymology, new or unusual... William Safire (retired as an Op-Ed columnist as of late January 2005 – to be replaced by John Tierney around April 2005, but to continue as Language columnist).

Diversity

The New York Times received a 100% rating on the Corporate Equality Index released by the HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. The HRC envisions an America where [LGBT] people are ensured of their basic equal rights, and can be open, honest and safe at home, at work and... Human Rights Campaign starting in 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004, the third year of the report.


See also

  • The New York Times bestseller list is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. It appears in the Sunday New York Times in the Book Review Section. Unlike some lists of best sellers, The New York Times... New York Times bestseller list
  • Current History is the oldest United States publication devoted exclusively to world affairs. Current History was founded by The New York Times in 1914 in order to provide detailed coverage of World War I. The magazine has no institutional, political, or governmental affiliations, and is privately owned. Past contributors to... Current History

Further reading

  • John Hess, My Times: A Memoir of Dissent, Seven Stories Press (2003), cloth, ISBN 1583226044; trade paperback, Seven Stories Press (2003), ISBN 1583226222
  • Seth Mnookin, Hard News: The Scandals at The New York Times and Their Meaning for American Media, Random Hours (2004), cloth, ISBN 1400062446.

External links

  • The New York Times on the Web (http://www.nytimes.com/)
  • WQXR, the Times' radio station (http://www.wqxr.com/)
  • Official history of the Times (http://www.nytco.com/company-timeline-1851.html)
  • Celebrated NYT reporter was a federal informant (http://www.sianews.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1618) citing David Cay Johnston Perfectly Legal ISBN 1591840198
  • "The Times and Iraq (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/26/international/middleeast/26FTE_NOTE.html)," New York Times, May 26, 2004.
  • Daniel Okrent, "Weapons of Mass Destruction? Or Mass Distraction? (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/30/weekinreview/30bott.html)" New York Times, May 30, 2004.
  • "Times Watch (http://www.timeswatch.com/)", documents alleged liberal bias in the Times, run by the The Media Research Center (MRC), founded in 1987 by L. Brent Bozell III. On its website, its mission is to bring balance and responsibility to the news media. Leaders of Americas conservative movement have long believed that within the national news media a strident liberal bias existed... Media Research Center
  • statistical analysis of the NYT behaviour, from 1946 to 1994, by Riccardo Puglisi (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=573801/)

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The New York Times > Member Center > Site Help > The New York Times Privacy Policy Highlights (860 words)
The New York Times may perform statistical analyses of subscribers and their subscribing and purchasing patterns for product development purposes and to generally inform advertisers about the nature of our subscriber base.
If, at any time, you prefer not to receive traditional mail or telephone solicitations originated by The New York Times Home Delivery Department and its third party affiliates, you may choose to opt-out.
The New York Times is a TRUSTe licensee and you may contact TRUSTe if you feel a privacy question is not properly addressed.
The New York Times - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6026 words)
The New York Times was founded on September 18, 1851 by Henry Jarvis Raymond and George Jones (as the New-York Daily Times).
In 1964, the paper was the defendant in a libel case known as New York Times Co. v.
In October 2005, Times reporter Judith Miller was released from prison after an 85-days, when she agreed to testify to Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald’s grand jury after receiving a personal waiver, both on the phone and in writing, of her earlier confidential source agreement with Lewis "Scooter" Libby.
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