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Encyclopedia > New wave music
New Wave
Stylistic origins: Punk Rock, Ska, Reggae, Power pop etc.
Cultural origins: Late 1970s, United Kingdom
Typical instruments: Guitar - Bass - Drums - Keyboards
Mainstream popularity: Large, worldwide, especially in late 1970s and early 1980s
Subgenres
Electropop - Mod revival - New Romantic - Synthpop
Fusion genres
Synthpunk - 2 Tone

New Wave was a music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. It emerged from punk rock as a reaction against the popular music of the 1970s. New wave incorporated various influences such as the rock 'n roll styles of the pre-hippie era, ska, reggae, power pop, the mod subculture, electronic music, funk etc. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... An electronic keyboard. ... This is a list of electronic music genres and sub-genres, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... Electropop (also called Technopop) is a form of synth pop music that is made with synthesizers, and which first flourished from 1978 to 1981. ... The mod revival was a music genre and subculture that started in the United Kingdom in 1978 and later spread to other countries (to a lesser degree). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Defining characteristics of synthpunk (also known as synth-punk) bands include being founded at the same time (late 1970s) and place (California) as many US punk bands, performing with those same punk bands, in those same punk clubs, with records released on those same punk labels, preferring electronic instruments such... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rock and roll (also spelled rock n roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For other uses, see Mod. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Overview

The term New Wave itself is a source of much confusion. Originally, Seymour Stein, the head of Sire Records, needed a term by which he could market his newly signed bands, who had frequently played the club CBGB. Because radio consultants in the U.S. had advised their clients that punk rock was a fad (and because many stations that had embraced disco had been hurt by the backlash), Stein settled on the term "new wave". He felt that the music was the musical equivalent of the French New Wave film movement of the 1960s.[citation needed] Like those film makers, his new artists (most notably Talking Heads) were anti-corporate, experimental, and from a generation that had grown up as critical consumers of the art they now practiced. Thus, the term "new wave" was initially interchangeable with "punk". Seymour Stein is an entrepreneur in the music industry whose career spans from the 50s onwards. ... Sire Records Company is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group and distributed through Warner Bros. ... CBGB (Country, Blue Grass, and Blues) was a music club at 315 Bowery at Bleecker Street in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the music genre. ... The New Wave (French: La Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... The Talking Heads was an American rock band formed in 1974 in New York City and active until 1991. ...


Soon, however, listeners themselves began to differentiate these musicians from "true punks". The music journalist Charles Shaar Murray, in writing about the Boomtown Rats, has indicated that the term New Wave became an industry catch-all for musicians affiliated with the punk movement, but in some way different from it:[1] Charles Shaar Murray is an English music journalist. ... The Boomtown Rats The Boomtown Rats (1975-1985) were a punk rock/new wave group headed by Bob Geldof, who was later known for organizing charity rock concerts such as Band Aid (intended to help famine victims in Ethiopia), Live Aid, Live 8, and Hands Across America (intended to help... Punks at a music festival The punk subculture is a subculture that is based around punk rock music. ...

The Rats didn’t conform precisely to the notional orthodoxies of punk, but then neither did many other bands at the forefront of what those who were scared of the uncompromising term 'punk' later bowdlerized to New Wave. You weren’t allowed to have long hair! The Ramones did. Guitar solos verboten! The defence calls Television. Facial hair a capital offence! Two members of The Stranglers are in mortal danger. Age police on the prowl for wrinklies on the run! Cells await Ian Dury, Knox from The Vibrators and most of The Stranglers. Pedal steel guitars and country music too inextricably linked with Laurel Canyon coke-hippies and snooze-inducing Mellow Mafia singer/songwriterismo. Elvis Costello, you’re busted. The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... One kind of modern beard. ... The Stranglers are an English rock music group, formed on September 11, 1974 in Guildford, Surrey. ... Ian Dury, in a look combining Gene Vincent with a Cockney pearly king. ... The Vibrators are a British punk rock band, formed in 1976. ... Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Laurel Canyon, Los Angeles, California is a canyon neighborhood, like Topanga Canyon, so its very oriented to the main canyon street, Laurel Canyon Boulevard. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ...

Music that followed the anarchic garage band ethos of the Sex Pistols was distinguished as "punk", while music that tended toward experimentation, lyrical complexity, or more polished production, was categorised as "New Wave". This came to include musicians who had come to prominence in the British pub rock scene of the mid-1970s, such as Ian Dury, Nick Lowe, Eddie and the Hot Rods and Dr Feelgood; [2] acts associated with the New York club CBGBs, such as Television, Patti Smith, and Blondie; and singer-songwriters who were noted for their barbed lyrical wit, such as Elvis Costello, Tom Robinson and Joe Jackson. Furthermore, many artists who would have originally been classified as punk were also termed New Wave. A 1977 Phonogram compilation album of the same name features US artists including the Dead Boys, the Ramones, Talking Heads and the Runaways.[3] The term garage band has several meanings, all related in someway to music. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ... Revival of the Pub Rock Scene made popular by Dire Straits and Elvis Costello. ... Bowi EP sleeve (1977). ... ... Dr. Feelgood is a British pub rock band, which was formed in mid 1971. ... CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a legendary club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ... Patty Smyth is also a musician, formerly of the band Scandal. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Tom Robinson (born June 1, 1950, in Cambridge) is an English songwriter and broadcaster probably best-known for the UK hit songs 2-4-6-8 Motorway (1977), Sing If Youre Glad To Be Gay (1978) and War Baby (1983). ... Joe Jackson (born David Ian Jackson, 11 August 1954, Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire) is an English musician and singer-songwriter probably best-known for the 1979 hit song Is She Really Going Out With Him?, which still gets extensive FM radio airplay; for his 1982 hit, Steppin Out; and for... The Dead Boys were a early punk band that formed in Cleveland, Ohio about 1975, evolving out of the band Rocket From The Tombs. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Talking Heads was an American rock band formed in 1974 in New York City and active until 1991. ... This article is about the 1970s band. ...


Later still, "New Wave" came to imply a less noisy, more pop sound, and to include acts manufactured by record labels, while the term post-punk was coined to describe the darker, less pop-influenced groups, as Siouxsie & the Banshees, The Cure and The Psychedelic Furs. Although distinct, punk, New Wave, and post-punk all shared common ground: an energetic reaction to the supposedly overproduced, uninspired popular music of the 1970s. Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... This article is about the band. ... The Psychedelic Furs are an influential English post-punk band founded in the late 1970s. ...


Tom Petty (probably in jest) has taken credit for "inventing" New Wave. He has been quoted as saying that journalists struggled to define his band, The Heartbreakers, recognising they were not punk rock, but still wanting to identify them with Elvis Costello and the Sex Pistols. He also suggests — again, probably half-jokingly — that the song "When the Time Comes" from the You’re Gonna Get It! album (1978) "might have started New Wave. Maybe that was the one."[4] Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer and guitarist. ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... Sex Pistols are an iconic and highly influential English punk rock band, formed in London in 1975. ...


Definition of New Wave in the United States

New Wave in the United States is a popular catchall term used to describe music that emerged in the late 1970’s and crested during the 1982-1983 period in what was dubbed the second British Invasion when groups deemed “New Wave” scored high on the charts. The artists deemed “New Wave” in the late 1970’s such as Elvis Costello, The Police, Gary Numan, and Squeeze dovetails with the original definition of the genre. Starting in the early 1980’s and continuing until around 1988 the term New Wave was used in America to describe nearly every new pop/rock artist especially those that used synthesizers. Examples of artists defined in the United States as New Wave during this period that would not fit the original definition include Duran Duran, A Flock of Seagulls, Depeche Mode, Eurythmics, The Fixx, Adam and the Ants, Human League, Naked Eyes and Culture Club. The term continues to be used today to describe those groups. The 1980 Robert Stigwood movie flop Times Square was to New Wave what Saturday Night Fever was to Disco, and featured a double album soundtrack of New Wave music which quickly found itself in the delete bins. [5][6][7][8][9][10] For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... This article is about the rock band. ... For the video game programmer Garry Newman, see Garrys Mod. ... For other uses, see Squeeze (disambiguation). ... Duran Duran are an English pop group notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... For the bands self-titled debut album, see A Flock of Seagulls (album). ... Depeche Mode (pronounced ) are an electronic music group formed in 1980, in Basildon, Essex, England. ... For the approach to music education, see Eurhythmics. ... The cover of The Fixs first single from 1981: Subsequently the band would change their name to The Fixx, after learning of another band with a prior claim on the name The Fix. ... Adam & the Ants were a rock and roll group during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... The Human League are an English synthpop band formed in 1977, who, after several changes in line up, achieved great popularity in the 1980s and a limited comeback in the mid-1990s. ... Naked Eyes is an English synthpop band, best known for their singles, a cover of the Burt Bacharach / Hal David standard (Theres) Always Something There to Remind Me (Bacharach himself has cited the cover as a personal favourite), and their subsequent hit the Paul McCartney like Promises, Promises. // Naked... Culture Club is a popular English new romantic rock group, that achieved considerable global success in the 1980s. ... Robert Stigwood (born April 16, 1934 in Adelaide, Australia) is an Australian-born entertainment entrepreneur. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a Brooklyn discotheque. ... This article is about the music genre. ...


New Wave revivals

In the early 1990s, the British music weekly NME grouped together a number of guitar-based bands under the unwieldy banner New Wave of New Wave. These groups, including S*M*A*S*H, These Animal Men, Elastica and Echobelly, drew on the aesthetics of 1970s New Wave, including spiky guitars, tight-fitting suits and skinny ties. For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... The New Wave of New Wave (NWONW) was a term coined by music journalists to describe a sub-genre of the British alternative rock scene in the early 90s. ... S*M*A*S*H were a punk band who were briefly popular in the early 1990s in the UK. S*M*A*S*H were formed by Ed Borrie (vocals, guitar), Salvatorre Alessi (cretited as Salv) (bass), and Rob Hague (drums) in Welwyn Garden City in Hertfordshire, England. ... These Animal Men were a UK band achieving minor fame in the 1990s as part of the New Wave of New Wave and splitting, after 2 albums, in 1998. ... Elastica were a Britpop band who were popular in the 1990s, formed by Justine Frischmann after leaving Suede in 1991. ... Echobelly are a British/Swedish alternative rock band. ... Aesthetics is commonly perceived as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. ...


In the late 1990s, the Omaha, Nebraska-based band The Faint drew heavily upon New Wave to create its debut album Media, released on Saddle Creek Records in 1998. In the first decade of the 21st century, the electroclash scene in Brooklyn and London (at clubs like Nag Nag Nag and Beyond Club) revived the synth-pop aesthetic for kids born in the 1980s. Many other indie rock bands re-popularized New Wave sounds as part of the post-punk revival movement with varying success, most popularly the Kaiser Chiefs, Franz Ferdinand, The Killers, The Bravery and New Orleans' Mute Math. Other bands who have brought back New Wave music in the new decade have been the Epoxies, theSTART, The Sounds, and Vernian process as well as the re-union of Squeeze. Omaha redirects here. ... The Faint is an indie rock/synth pop band. ... Saddle Creek Records is an independent record label based in Omaha, Nebraska. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... This article is about the band. ... Franz Ferdinand are an award winning rock band, from Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Killers are an American rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada, most famous for their hit singles Somebody Told Me, Mr. ... The Bravery is an American rock band from New York City that consists of Sam Endicott, John Conway, Anthony Burulcich, Michael Zakarin, and Mike Hindert. ... Mute Math is a New Orleans rock band formed in 2003. ... The Epoxies are a Portland, Oregon-based band. ... theSTART is an American New Wave band from Los Angeles, California, formed in 1998. ... The Sounds are an upbeat New Wave band from Helsingborg, Sweden founded in 1999. ... Squeeze was a New Wave band that formed in London in 1974. ...


New Wave fashion

New Wave fashions on the cover of Blondie's album Parallel Lines.

New Wave fashions were a conscious reaction to the hippie styles of the 1960s, which had spilled over into the mainstream by the late 1970s[citation needed]. Thus, flares and long hair for men were replaced by more body-conscious clothing and shorter, often spiky, hairstyles. The tight-fitting suits and thin ties worn by Blondie on the cover of their album Parallel Lines epitomise the New Wave look, which harks back to the rock and roll styles of the pre-hippie era. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ... Parallel Lines, released in 1978, was the third album from the band Blondie, and also their most popular and best selling. ... Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... Bell bottoms are trousers that become more wide from the knees downwards. ... Parallel Lines, released in 1978, was the third album from the band Blondie, and also their most popular and best selling. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Another aspect was a desire to embrace contemporary synthetic materials as a protest and celebration of plastic. This involved the use of spandex, bright colors (such as fluorescents), and mass-produced, tawdry jewelry and ornaments, typified by the dayglo aesthetic of the band X-Ray Spex. As a fashion movement, then, New Wave was both a post-modern belief in creative pastiche and a continuation of Pop Art’s satire and fascination with manufacturing. An important offshoot of new wave fashion was the New Romantic movement, which emphasized androgyny and extensive use of synthetic-looking cosmetics for both genders. For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... Example of spandex Spandex or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. ... Mass production is the production of large amounts of standardised products on production lines. ... This article is about the punk band. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


New Wave revivalists are currently very popular in New York, Boston and LA (centering around nightclubs like New York’s Misshapes, Boston's Manray nightclub, Seattle's Buddha Bar in Belltown and featured in art and fashion magazines like Visionaire). The style has also recently been a major influence in high fashion, for example in the most recent collections of designers like Scott Gerst and Hedi Slimane (ex-creative director of Dior Homme.) Manray was a nightclub in Central Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts in the United States. ... An art and fashion publication that has come out in limited, numbered editions 3 times a year since Spring of 1991. ... August 16, 2005 My name is Gregory L Barrett and I believe that the most fashionable people on the earth are the Children of Jesus Christ. ... Hedi Slimane (born July 5, 1968 in Paris) is a French fashion designer. ... A creative director is a position usually found within the advertising, media or entertainment industries, but may be useful in other creative organizations such as web development and software development firms as well. ... Christian Dior (January 21, 1905 – October 23, 1957), was an influential French fashion designer. ...


References

  1. ^ Murray, Charles Shaar. Sleevenotes to CD reissue of The Boomtown Rats, reproduced at [1]. Accessed January 21, 2007.
  2. ^ Adams, Bobby. Nick Lowe: A Candid Interview, Bomp magazine, January 1979, reproduced at [2]. Accessed January 21, 2007.
  3. ^ Savage, Jon. (1991) England's Dreaming, Faber & Faber
  4. ^ Zollo, Paul. (2005) Conversations with Tom Petty, Omnibus
  5. ^ 1984 Article by music journalist Robert Christgau
  6. ^ 1986 Knight Ridder news article
  7. ^ Where Are They Now: '80s New Wave Musicians ABC News November 29, 2007
  8. ^ Definition by Allmusic.com
  9. ^ Top 100 New Wave Songs listing with definition of the genre
  10. ^ 1984 New York Times Review of Simple Minds

Original UK LP album cover: The Boomtown Rats - The Boomtown Rats The Boomtown Rats was The Boomtown Rats 1977 first album and included the Rats first hit single as well as the subsequent Mary Of The 4th Form Tracks: Lookin After No. ...

Media

Image File history File links BlondieDenis. ... Music sample Denis Problems? See media help. ... Blondie is the name of an American rock band that first gained fame in the late 1970s, and which has sold over 140 million records. ... Image File history File links XTC_-_Making_Plans_For_Nigel_excerpt. ... XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ... XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ... Image File history File links RockLobster. ... Rock Lobster is The B-52s first single, released in 1978 and in a longer version placed on the bands self-titled debut album, The B-52s, one year later. ... The B-52s are a New Wave rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, an important center of alternative rock. ... Image File history File links Roxanne_by_The_Police. ... For the song Roxanne, Roxanne by U.T.F.O. and the rejoinders including Roxannes Revenge by Roxanne Shanté, see Roxanne Wars Roxanne is a hit song by the rock band The Police, first released in 1978 as a single and on their album Outlandos dAmour. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Image File history File links Wall_Of_Voodoo_-_Mexican_Radio_excerpt. ... Mexican Radio is a novelty song by the band Wall of Voodoo. ... Wall of Voodoo is a New Wave art - punk group from Los Angeles best known for the 1983 hit Mexican Radio. ... Whip It is the title of a 1980 single by the New Wave band Devo. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ...

New Wave styles

This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Revival of the Pub Rock Scene made popular by Dire Straits and Elvis Costello. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Synth rock is a descriptive phrase applied to the work of a variety of musical artists. ... Electropop (also called Technopop) is a form of synth pop music that is made with synthesizers, and which first flourished from 1978 to 1981. ... The mod revival was a music genre and subculture that started in the United Kingdom in 1978 and later spread to other countries (to a lesser degree). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... La Movida Madrileña (The Madrilene movement) is a sociocultural movement that took place in Madrid during the 1980s, triggered by an explosion of liberties after the death of Fascist dictator Francisco Franco, and the economic rise of Spain. ...

Parallel movements

Coldwave initially referred to a French style of post-punk and early darkwave music in the 1980s, taking its cue from bands like Joy Division, The Cure or Siouxsie & The Banshees and manifesting in music by KaS Product, Martin Dupont, Asylum Party, Norma Loy, Clair Obscur, Opera Multi Steel, and... Darkwave, also written as dark wave, is an umbrella term which refers to a movement that began in the late 1970s, coinciding with the popularity of new wave. ... Neue Deutsche Welle (New German Wave, often abbreviated NDW) was a genre of German music originally derived from punk rock and New Wave music in 1976. ... No Wave was a short-lived but influential music and art scene that thrived briefly in New York City during the late 1970s and early 1980s alongside the punk scene there. ...

Regional scenes

New Wave in Yugoslavia (Slovenian, Croatian and Bosnian: Novi val; Serbian: Нови талас or Novi talas; and Macedonian: Нов бран, translit. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this list be merged into a category entitled Category:New Wave groups. ... The New Wave of New Wave (NWONW) was a term coined by music journalists to describe a sub-genre of the British alternative rock scene in the early 90s. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Urgh! A Music War is a British film released in 1981 featuring performances of punk and New Wave music, filmed in 1980. ...

External links

  • About.com Profile of the New Wave Genre – another, slightly different, definition and history of New Wave.
  • Punk 2 New Wave Top 100 list and short reviews
  • Encyclopedia Britannica Definition
For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the town of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Baroque pop as a style originated in the mid 1960s as the flipside of sunshine pop. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Bubblegum pop (bubblegum rock, bubblegum music, youth music, or simply bubblegum) is a genre of pop music. ... Glam metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music that arose in the late 1970s - early 1980s in the United States. ... Glam punk is glam rock and punk rock music. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Sunshine pop, also known as sunshine rock, is a musical movement originating in California with its most famous exponents being The Beach Boys and The Mamas and the Papas. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Defining characteristics of synthpunk (also known as synth-punk) bands include being founded at the same time (late 1970s) and place (California) as many US punk bands, performing with those same punk bands, in those same punk clubs, with records released on those same punk labels, preferring electronic instruments such...

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New Wave Music : Full Line (408 words)
Music, fashion and activities popular in previous decades have all been revived at one time or another.
In the case of New Wave, the term was first popularised in the 1960s French cinema.
New Wave denotes all facets of culture but most especially that of music.
A review of new wave music in 5.1 form: Simple Minds' "Once Upon A Time" dvd-audio - Beastie Boys Message ... (2705 words)
A personal note about the music: even before I knew the lyrics, I knew something deeper than the more typical “my baby loves me” issues were being sung about in those songs I heard in 1985 on the radio.
But a large part of my music collection also includes music that simply makes me feel good, which to me is just as important as the deeper stuff (and this album does have its share of such material, but on a more subtle level).
Music is a form of art to me so whatever listening method makes you feel good is all that matters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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