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Encyclopedia > New Zealand general election, 2005
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Results of the 2005 New Zealand General Election

The 2005 New Zealand general election took place on 17 September 2005 and determined the composition of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. No single party or recognised bloc won a majority in the unicameral House of Representatives, but the Labour Party of Prime Minister Helen Clark secured two more seats than its closest rival, the National Party of Dr Don Brash. Most of the other parliamentary parties polled less well than in the previous election, losing votes and seats, but the new Māori Party took four electorate seats, including three from Labour. Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 48th New Zealand Parliament will, when final results are confirmed and MPs are sworn in, be the next term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other people named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... Dr Don Brash Dr Donald Thomas Brash (born 24 September 1940), New Zealand politician, has served as the Leader of the Opposition and parliamentary leader of the National Party, the countrys main opposition party since October 2003. ... The Māori Party, a political party in New Zealand based around Māori citizens, formed around Tariana Turia, a former Labour Party member who had been a New Zealand Cabinet minister in the current Labour-dominated coalition government. ... In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ...


Brash deferred conceding the election until 1 October 2005, when the inclusion of special votes caused National's tally of seats to drop from 49 on election night to 48. October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The election saw a strong recovery by National, winning 21 more seats than at the 2002 election, when it had suffered its worst result since it first fought a general election in 1938. Despite this resurgence, National failed to displace Labour as the largest party in Parliament. National's gains apparently came mainly at the expense of smaller parties, while Labour won only two seats fewer than in 2002. The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


On 17 October, Clark announced a new coalition agreement that saw the return of her minority government coalition with the Progressive Party, with confidence-and-supply support from New Zealand First and from United Future. New Zealand First parliamentary leader Winston Peters and United Future parliamentary leader Peter Dunne became ministers of the Crown, though outside Cabinet. Peters became Minister of Foreign Affairs while Dunne became Minister of Revenue. The Green Party, which had thrown its weight behind Labour before the election, received no cabinet post (see below), but gained several concessions on matters such as energy and transport from Labour. October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed when no political party has won a majority of seats in the parliament, typically by the party that does have a plurality. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament to give members of parliament a chance to register their confidence for a government by means of a parliamentary vote. ... Supply has a number of meanings: In economics, supply is the aggregate amount of any material good that can be called into being at a certain price point; it one half of the equation of supply and demand. ... New Zealand First functions as a political party in New Zealand. ... Current United Future logo United Future New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament with three MPs -- two list MPs, and one electorate MP, leader Peter Dunne (see MMP for the difference). ... The Right Honourable Winston Raymond Peters (born April 11, 1945) is a New Zealand politician and the current Minister of Foreign Affairs, outside cabinet. ... Peter Dunne The Honourable Peter Dunne (born 17 March 1954 - ) leads New Zealands United Future political party. ... The New Zealand Cabinet functions as the policy and decision-making body of the New Zealand governments executive branch. ... The Minister of Foreign Affairs is a major portfolio in the Cabinet of New Zealand. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ...

Contents


Official election results table

[discuss] – [edit]
Summary of the 17 September 2005 New Zealand House of Representatives election results
Parties Votes % Change Electorate
seats
List seats Total +/-
New Zealand Labour Party 935,319 41.1 -0.2 31 19 50 -2
New Zealand National Party 889,813 39.1 +18.0 31 17 48 +21
New Zealand First 130,115 5.7 -4.7 0 7 7 -6
Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand 120,521 5.3 -1.7 0 6 6 -3
Māori Party 48,263 2.1 +2.1 4 0 4 +4
United Future New Zealand 60,860 2.7 -4.0 1 2 3 -5
ACT New Zealand 34,469 1.5 -5.6 1 1 2 -7
New Zealand Progressive Party 26,441 1.2 -0.5 1 0 1 -1
Other parties 29,828 1.3 0 0 0 0
Total 2,275,629 100.0 69 52 121 -1
Informal votes 10,561
Total votes cast 2,286,190

The results of the election give a Gallagher index of disproportionality of 1.11. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... New Zealand First functions as a political party in New Zealand. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ... The Māori Party, a political party in New Zealand based around Māori citizens, formed around Tariana Turia, a former Labour Party member who had been a New Zealand Cabinet minister in the current Labour-dominated coalition government. ... Current United Future logo United Future New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament with three MPs -- two list MPs, and one electorate MP, leader Peter Dunne (see MMP for the difference). ... ACT New Zealand is a free market liberal party in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ... The Gallagher Index (or least squares) can be used to measure the disproportionality of electoral systems, in particular majoritarian systems. ...


For further details of results (including results by constituency) see New Zealand general election, 2005: in depth results


Analysis of results

Going into the election, Labour had assurances of support from the Greens (six seats in 2005, down three from 2002) and from the Progressives (one seat, down one). This three-party bloc won 57 seats, leaving Clark four seats short of the 61 seats needed for a majority in the 121-seat Parliament (decreased from the expected 122 because the final results gave the Māori Party only one overhang seat, after it appeared to win two overhang seats on election night). On October 5 the Māori Party began a series of hui to decide whom to support. That same day reports emerged that a meeting between Helen Clark and Māori co-leader Tariana Turia on October 3 had already ruled out a formal coalition between Labour and the Māori Party. Māori Party leaders also held discussions with National representatives, but most New Zealanders thought the Māori Party more likely to give confidence-supply support to a Labour-dominated government because its supporters apparently heavily backed Labour in the party vote. Overhang seats can arise in elections under mixed member proportional (MMP), when a party is entitled to fewer seats as a result of party votes than it has won constituencies. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... A hui is a New Zealand Māori social gathering or assembly in a Māori community. ... Tariana Turia (born 8 April 1944) is a New Zealand politician. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Had Turia and her co-leader Pita Sharples opted to join a Labour-Progressive-Green coalition, Clark would have had sufficient support to govern without support from other parties. As a result, Labour needed the support of New Zealand First (seven seats, down six) and United Future (three seats, down five) to form a government. New Zealand First said it would support (or at least abstain from opposing in confidence motions) the party with the most seats. Clark sought a positive New Zealand First commitment rather than abstention. United Future, who supported the previous Labour-Progressive minority government in confidence and supply, said it would talk first to the party with the most seats about a support or coalition arrangement. Both New Zealand First and United Future said they would not support a Labour-led coalition which included Greens in Cabinet posts. However, United Future indicated it could support a government where the Greens gave supply and confidence votes [1]. Dr. Pita Russell Sharples (born 20 July 1941), a Māori academic and politician, currently co-leads the Māori Party, he currently is the member for Tamaki Makaurau(Auckalnd City) in New Zealands Parliament. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed when no political party has won a majority of seats in the parliament, typically by the party that does have a plurality. ...


Brash had only one possible scenario to become prime minister: a centre-right coalition with United Future and ACT (two seats, down seven). Given the election results, however, such a coalition would have required the confidence-and-supply votes of both New Zealand First and the Māori Party. This appeared highly unlikely on several counts. New Zealand First's involvement in such a coalition would have run counter to Peters' promise to deal with the biggest party, and Turia and Sharples would have had difficulty in justifying supporting National after their supporters' overwhelming support for Labour in the party vote. Turia and Sharples probably remembered the severe mauling New Zealand First suffered in 1999. (Its supporters in 1996 believed they had voted to get rid of National, only to have Peters go into coalition with National; New Zealand First has never really recovered.) Even without this to consider, National had indicated it would abolish the Maori seats if it won power. ACT New Zealand is a free market liberal party in the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... After the establishment of Westminster-style Parliamentary Government in New Zealand in 1852, the Māori inhabitants had allotted to them from 1867 specific seats in the New Zealand Parliament. ...


The new government as eventually formed consisted of Labour and Progressive in coalition, while New Zealand First and United Future entered agreements of support on confidence and supply motions. In an unprecedented move, Peters and Dunne became Foreign Affairs Minister and Revenue Minister, respectively, but remain outside cabinet and have no obligatory cabinet collective responsibility on votes outside their respective portfolios. Cabinet collective responsibility is constitutional convention in the states that use the Westminster System. ...


Possible government setups


Background

Election billboards advertise the parties and candidates standing nationwide and in each electorate
Election billboards advertise the parties and candidates standing nationwide and in each electorate

The 2002 election had seen the governing Labour Party retain office. However, its junior coalition partner, the Alliance, collapsed, leaving Labour to form a coalition with the new Progressive Coalition, formed by former Alliance leader Jim Anderton. The coalition then obtained an agreement of support ("confidence and supply") from United Future, enabling it to form a stable minority government. The National Party, Labour's main opponents, suffered a considerable defeat, winning only 21% of the vote (22.5% of the seats). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1197 KB) Election billboards advertising parties standing candidates in the 2005 New Zealand general election. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1197 KB) Election billboards advertising parties standing candidates in the 2005 New Zealand general election. ... Roadside billboards frequently encourage passersby to visit local businesses. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Current Alliance logo The Alliance, when referring to New Zealand politics, refers to a left-wing political party. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ... James Patrick Anderton (almost always referred to as Jim Anderton) is leader of the Progressive Party, a political party in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Current United Future logo United Future New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament with three MPs -- two list MPs, and one electorate MP, leader Peter Dunne (see MMP for the difference). ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ...


The collapse of National's vote led ultimately to the replacement of leader Bill English with parliamentary newcomer Don Brash on 28 October 2003. Brash began an aggressive campaign against the Labour-dominated government. A major boost to this campaign came with his "Orewa speech" (27 January 2004), in which he attacked the Labour-dominated government for giving "special treatment" to the Māori population, particularly over the foreshore and seabed controversy. This resulted in a surge of support for the National Party, although most polls indicated that this subsequently subsided. National also announced it would not stand candidates in the Māori seats, with some smaller parties following suit. This article is about the New Zealand politician. ... Dr Don Brash Dr Donald Thomas Brash (born 24 September 1940), New Zealand politician, has served as the Leader of the Opposition and parliamentary leader of the National Party, the countrys main opposition party since October 2003. ... 1628 - The Siege of La Rochelle, which had been ongoing for 14 months, ends with Huguenot surrender 1664 - The Duke of York and Albanys Maritime Regiment of Foot later to be known as the Royal Marines is established. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr Don Brash delivered the controversial Orewa speech in the New Zealand town of Orewa on 27 January 2004. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Māori language, see Māori language. ... The New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy is a debate in the politics of New Zealand. ... Māori Seats giving positions for Māori in the New Zealand Parliament were not created until 1867 even though Westminster-style Parliamentary Government was established in New Zealand in 1852. ...


The foreshore-and-seabed controversy also resulted in the establishment of the Māori Party. The Māori Party hoped to break Labour's traditional (and current) dominance in the Māori seats, as New Zealand First had in the 1996 election. New Zealand First functions as a political party in New Zealand. ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ...


A number of "minor" (less successful) parties contested the election. These included Destiny New Zealand (the political branch of the Destiny Church) and the Direct Democracy Party. Current Destiny New Zealand logo Destiny New Zealand, a Christian political party in New Zealand, centres around the charismatic Destiny Church, founded and led by the televangelist Brian Tamaki. ... This article is about a church denomination in New Zealand. ... The Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand is a New Zealand political party which promotes greater participation in government by ordinary citizens. ...


Key policy platforms

Labour Party

The Labour Party campaigned on the platform of (Labour web site):

  • Student loans - writing off interest if the recipient stays in New Zealand
  • Health - a number of extra public-hospital operations pledged
  • Treaty of Waitangi - accepting no lodgements for treaty claims after September 1, 2008
  • Increasing rates rebates
  • A "kiwisaver" program, aimed at getting first homeowners into their own homes
  • Sponsoring 5,000 new apprenticeships
  • Increasing community police-force numbers by 250.
  • A "Working for Families" tax relief/benefit programme aimed at lower to middle-income families

Student loans are loans offered to students to assist in payment of the costs of professional education. ... The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: rates (tax) A rate is a special kind of ratio, of two measurements with different units. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ...

National Party

The National party campaigned on the platform of (National Party Press Release):

  • Taxation - lowering the income tax rates
  • Removing references to the Treaty of Waitangi from existing legislation; resolving all treaty claims amicably by 2010; and removing the racially distinct Māori seats from parliament
  • Making student-loan repayments and $5000 of pre-school childcare costs tax-deductable
  • "Reworking" the New Zealand Resource Management Act to make development easier
  • "Removing excessive bureaucracy" in the education system, in particular by overhauling the NCEA, and by re-introducing "bulk funding" of schools
  • Abolishing early parole for violent criminals. (Currently, most prisoners become eligible for parole after serving one-third of their sentence)
  • A return to "market rents" for state-housing tenants, including a system of paying housing subsidies (for the poorest tenants) directly to private landlords
  • Part public/private ownership of the public health system
  • A "work-for-the-dole" scheme
  • Abolishing the Maori electorates

The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... Māori Seats giving positions for Māori in the New Zealand Parliament were not created until 1867 even though Westminster-style Parliamentary Government was established in New Zealand in 1852. ... Student loans are loans offered to students to assist in payment of the costs of professional education. ... In the United States, taxpayers will get a tax refund, a refund on their U.S. income tax, if the tax they owe is less than the sum of: The total amount of refundable tax credits that they claim. ... The Resource Management Act (RMA) is a significant, and at times, controversial Act of Parliament passed in 1991 in New Zealand. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bureaucracy is a concept in sociology and political science. ... NCEA can mean: National Certificate of Educational Achievement, New Zealand National Council for Educational Awards, Ireland National Conference on Ethics in America This page about a 4-letter acronym or initialism is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... In New Zealand state housing is the system of public housing offered to citizens unable to afford private rents. ... Unemployment benefits are sums of money given to the unemployed by the government or a compulsory para-governmental insurance system. ...

Polls

A series of opinion polls published in June 2005 indicated that the National Party had moved ahead of Labour for the first time since June 2004. Commentators speculated that a prominent billboard campaign may have contributed to this. Some said the National Party had peaked too early. The polls released throughout July showed once more an upward trend for Labour, with Labour polling about 6% above National. The release by the National Party of a series of tax-reform proposals in August increased its ratings in the polls. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Direct comparisons between the following polls have no statistical validity:

Poll Date Labour National NZ First Greens
One News Colmar Brunton 29 August 43% 40% 5% 7%
3 News TNS 1 September 39% 41% 6% 6%
Herald DigiPoll 2 September 43.4% 39.1% 6.6% 5%
Fairfax NZ/ACNeilsen 3 September 41% 44% <5% 5%
One News Colmar Brunton 4 September 38% 46% 4.6% 6%
3 News TNS 7 September 45% 36% 5% 7%
Herald Digipoll 8 September 40.6% 40.1% 7.1% 5.6%
Herald Digipoll 11 September 42.1% 38.5% 5% 6%
ACNielsen-Sunday Star-Times 11 September 37% 44% 5% 6%
One News Colmar Brunton 11 September 39% 41% 6% 6%
Fairfax ACNielsen 14 September 37% 43% 7% 6%
3 News TNS 15 September 40.5% 38.7% 6.8% 6.9%
TVNZ Colmar Brunton 15 September 38% 41% 5.5% 5.1%
Herald Digipoll 16 September 44.6% 37.4% 4.5% 4.6 %

No one political event can explain the significant differences between most of these polls over the period between them. They showed either volatility in the electorate and/or flaws in the polling methods. In the later polls, the issue of National's knowledge of a series of pamphlets (distributed by members of the Exclusive Brethren and attacking the Green and Labour parties) appeared not to have reduced National Party support. August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... The Exclusive Brethren are a secretive Christian cult whose current leader is Australian businessman Bruce D. Hales. ...


Candidates

For lists of candidates in the 2005 election see:

This page lists candidates in New Zealands 2005 elections, grouping them by the electorate that they will contest. ... This page lists candidates in New Zealands 2005 elections, grouping them by their party affiliations. ... This page provides the party lists put forward in New Zealands 2005 elections. ...

Voting

Postal voting for New Zealanders abroad began on 31 August. Ballot voting took place on Saturday September 17, from 9am to 7pm. The Chief Electoral Office released a provisional result at 12.05am on September 18. August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ...


Funding

New Zealand operates on a system whereby the Electoral Commission allocates funding for television and radio advertising. Parties must use their own money for all other forms of advertising, but may not use any of their own money for television or radio advertising.

Party Funding
Labour $1,100,000
National $900,000
ACT $200,000
Greens $200,000
NZ First $200,000
United Future $200,000
Māori Party $125,000
Progressives $75,000
Alliance $20,000
Christian Heritage NZ $20,000
Destiny NZ $20,000
Libertarianz $20,000
99 MP Party* $10,000
Beneficiaries Party* $10,000
Democrats $10,000
National Front* $10,000
New Zealand F.R.P.P.* $10,000
Patriot Party* $10,000
Republic Aotearoa New Zealand Party* $10,000
The Republic of New Zealand* $10,000

*Must register for funding
Source: Electoral Commission


Controversies

Labour and five other political parties were investigated for alleged breaches of election spending rules relating to the 2005 election, but none were prosecuted [2]. Labour was accused of overspending by over $400,000 in the 2005 general election, and using public money to finance their campaign. Under New Zealand's political system, parties may only spend up to a certain amount on campaigning. The Electoral Commission, the independent body charged with ensuring that campaign rules are adhered to referred the Labour Party to the police[3]. According to the commission's data, Labour disclosed expenditure of $2,798,603, $418,603 more than the party's $2,380,000 limit. On this point, the police decided that "there was insufficient evidence to indicate that an offence under s214b of the Electoral Act had been committed."[4] Additionally, claims allege Labour used over $400,000 of taxpayer's money to produce a number of pamphlets and "pledge cards" promoting Labour, and that this constituted advertising for the party but it was not authorised by the party secretary as required. This was also investigated by the police, who decided that "there was sufficient evidence to establish a prima facie case" of an offence under section 221 of the act (which requires party advertising to be authorised in writing by the secretary). However they also decided that no prosecution should be laid, preferring instead to warn Labour that similar future offences would risk prosecution. The Electoral Commission of New Zealand is a governmental body responsible for administering certain aspects of the countrys electoral system. ...


Claims have also been made that the Labour government allegedly used public money to promote their party in the past. Before the 2005 campaign, public funds were used to erect bus billboards showing the Labour election phrase "You're better off with Labour"[5]. However the Speaker of the House, Margaret Wilson (also a Labour MP) ruled that this was advertising for the National Budget and not the party itself.


External links

  • Elections New Zealand, joint website of the Electoral Enrolment Centre, Chief Electoral Office, and Electoral Commission.
  • 2005 General Election Results from Chief Electoral Office, Ministry of Justice
  • nzvotes.org, comparative information on parties, candidates and electorates
  • New Zealand Herald Election 2005 website
  • Stuff.co.nz Election 2005 website
  • Scoop Election 2005 website
  • Scoop Election 2005 campaign diary

 

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The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 31st term. ... The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 32nd term. ... The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 33rd term. ... The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 34th term. ... The 1966 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 35th term. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1969 were 45 seats won by the National Party, and 39 seats won by the Labour Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1972 were 55 seats won by the Labour party (led by Norman Kirk) and 32 seats won by the National Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... The 1975 New Zealand general election was the first election in New Zealand where all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1981 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... The 1993 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Until 1996, New Zealand used the British system of first past the post (FPP) for parliamentary elections . ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: New Zealand general election 2005 (358 words)
The New Zealand National Party is the second largest political party in the New Zealand Parliament, and forms the core of the Opposition.
The coalition went into the 1935 election under the title of the "National Political Federation", a name adopted to indicate that the new group would serve New Zealanders from all backgrounds (in contrast to the previous situation, where United served city-dwellers and Reform served farmers).
New Zealand often claims to be the first country in the world to have granted women's suffrage, although the accuracy of this often depends on the definitions used.
New Zealand general election 2005 - definition of New Zealand general election 2005 in Encyclopedia (667 words)
Beginning with the first election under the MMP electoral system, Labour and National found their traditional dominance gone, and needed to ally themselves with smaller parties.
The foreshore and seabed controversy also resulted in the creation of the new Maori Party, which may or may not play a large role in the 2005 election.
Some observers believe that the 2005 general election will be a return to "two party politics", citing evidence that with National's popularity coming directly from smaller parties.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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