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Encyclopedia > New Zealand elections
New Zealand

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
New Zealand
Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_New_Zealand. ... Politics of New Zealand takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic monarchy. ...








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Members of New Zealand's House of Representatives, commonly called "Parliament", normally gain their parliamentary seats through nationwide general elections, or (less frequently) in by-elections. General elections normally occur at least every three years in New Zealand, and operate using the Mixed Member Proportional electoral system. The Chief Electoral Office and the Electoral Commission co-ordinate the electoral system. New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... Anand Satyanand with Dame Silvia Cartwright Wikinews has news related to: New Governor-General of New Zealand announced Anand Satch[1] Satyanand, PCNZM (born 22 July 1944 in Auckland) is the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... The Executive Council of New Zealand is the body which provides the formal basis for the Cabinet. ... The New Zealand Cabinet functions as the policy and decision-making body of New Zealand governments executive branch. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... The Parliament of New Zealand consists of the Queen of New Zealand and the New Zealand House of Representatives and, until 1951, the New Zealand Legislative Council. ... The New Zealand House of Representatives is the legislature of New Zealand. ... In New Zealand the Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, the New Zealand House of Representatives (often also referred to as Parliament). The Speaker fulfils a number of important functions in relation to the operation the House, which is based... Margaret Wilson could also refer to a writer, or a tennis player Margaret Wilson (20th May 1947 - ), a New Zealand politician, currently serves as Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives. ... The Official Opposition in New Zealand is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the ruling government. ... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... For the American politician, see John A. Key. ... In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ... Referendums (or referenda) are held only occasionally by the government of New Zealand. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... The Right Honourable Dame Sian Seerpoohi Elias, GNZM, (born March 12, 1949) is the Chief Justice of New Zealand, and is therefore the most senior member of the countrys judiciary. ... The Court of Appeal of New Zealand, located in Wellington, is New Zealand’s principal intermediate appellate court. ... The High Court of New Zealand was established in 1841 and known as the Supreme Court until 1980. ... Region is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ... Territorial authorities is the formal term for the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The following is a list of New Zealand politicians, both past and present. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... This page lists a number of articles relating to issues, ideas, and events in New Zealand politics. ... Apirana Ngata, perhaps the most prominent Maori politician Māori politics is the politics of the Māori people, who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand and who are now the countrys largest minority. ... New Zealand’s foreign policy is oriented chiefly toward developed democratic nations and emerging Pacific economies. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... This article is about the political process. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... In 1993 New Zealand adopted Mixed Member Proportional as its electoral system after many years of first-past-the-post. ... The Electoral Commission of New Zealand is a governmental body responsible for administering certain aspects of the countrys electoral system. ...

Contents

Overview of elections

Voting

New Zealand general elections occur when the Prime Minister requests a dissolution of Parliament and therefore a general election. Theoretically, this can happen at any time, although a convention exists whereby Prime Ministers do not call elections unless they have no reasonable alternative. The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ...


Elections always take place on a Saturday, so as to minimise work-commitments inhibiting people from voting. Voting (the casting of ballots) happens at various polling stations, generally established in schools, churches, or other such public places. The 2005 election made use of 6,094 such polling stations. A polling station situated inside a suburban library in the north of Cambridge during the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ...


The voting process uses printed voting ballots, with voters marking their choices (one vote for a candidate and one vote for a party — see Electoral system of New Zealand) with an ink pen provided for their use. The voter then places the voting paper in a sealed ballot box. Voters can alternatively cast "special votes" if genuinely unable to attend a regular polling place (for example, if they have travelled overseas, or have impaired mobility). In 1993 New Zealand adopted Mixed Member Proportional as its electoral system after many years of first-past-the-post. ... Clear sided ballot boxes used in the Haitian general election in 2006. ...


Timing of elections

New Zealand general elections generally occur every three years. Unlike some other countries, New Zealand has no fixed election-date, but rather the Prime Minister determines the timing of general elections. Convention dictates that a general election should take place roughly three years after the previous general election — unless a major crisis arises or the Prime Minister loses the ability to command a majority in parliament. The 1930s and 1940s saw two elections delayed due to the Great Depression and World War II, respectively: the 1935 and 1943 elections, which would normally taken place in 1934 and 1941. The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 25th term. ... The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 27th term. ...


Early or "snap" elections have occurred at least three times in New Zealand's history: in 1951, 1984 and 2002. Early elections often provoke controversy, as they potentially give governing paqrties an advantage over opposition candidates. Note that of the three elections in which the government won an increased majority, two involved snap elections (1951 and 2002) — the other incumbent-boosting election took place in 1938). The 1984 snap election backfired on the government of the day: many believe that the Prime Minister, Robert Muldoon, called it while drunk.[1][2] See Snap election#New Zealand. A snap election is an election called earlier than scheduled. ... The 1951 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 30th term. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 26th term. ... For the fictional character in Jurassic Park, see List of characters in Jurassic Park. ... A snap election is an election called earlier than scheduled. ...


The Prime Minister's power to determine the election date can give the government some subtle advantages. For example, if governing parties believe that a section of the population will either vote against them or not at all, they might hold the election in early spring, when the weather may well keep less-committed voters away from the polls. Party strategists take the timing of important rugby matches into account, partly because a major match in the same weekend of the election will likely lower voting-levels, and partly because of a wide-spread belief that incumbent governments benefit from a surge of national pride when the All Blacks (the New Zealand national rugby team) win and suffer when they lose. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... First international  Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand  (15 August 1903) Largest win  New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan  (4 June 1995) Worst defeat  Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand  (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 The All Blacks are New Zealands national rugby...


Tradition associates elections with November — give or take a few weeks. After disruptions to the 36-month cycle, Prime Ministers tend to strive to restore it to a November base. Barring crises, the next general election should occur before Saturday 15 November 2008. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The next New Zealand general election is expected to take place in late 2008, and must be held no later than 15 November 2008. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Electoral roll

The electoral roll consists of a register of all eligible voters, organised (primarily alphabetically by surname) within electorates. All persons who meet the requirements for voting must by law register on the electoral roll, even if they do not intend to vote. The roll records the name, address and stated occupation of all voters, although individual electors can apply for "unpublished" status on the roll in special circumstances, such as when having their details printed in the electoral roll could threaten their personal safety. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Personal safety is the safety of an individual. ...


Electorates

New Zealanders refer to voting districts as "electorates", or as "seats". New Zealand currently has sixty-nine electorates (including seven Māori electorates specially set up for people of Māori ethnicity or ancestry who choose to place themselves on a separate electoral roll). All electorates have roughly the same number of people in them — the Representation Commission periodically reviews and alters electorate boundaries to preserve this approximate balance. The number of people per electorate depends on the population of the South Island — this, the less populous of the country's two main islands, has sixteen guaranteed electorates, so the ideal number of people per electorate equals the population of the South Island divided by sixteen. From this, the Commission determines the number of North Island, Māori and list seats, which may fluctuate accordingly. In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Māori Seats giving positions for Māori in the New Zealand Parliament were not created until 1867 even though Westminster-style Parliamentary Government was established in New Zealand in 1852. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... The South Island The South Island is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the more populous North Island. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ...


Supplementing the geographically-based electorate seats, the system currently allows for fifty-one at-large "list seats". A nation-wide "party-vote" fills these seats from lists submitted by political parties; they serve to make a party's total share of seats in parliament reflect its share of the party vote. For example, if a party wins 20% of the party vote, but only ten electorate seats, it will win fourteen list-seats, so that it has a total of 24 seats: 20% of the 120 seats in parliament. (For further explanation see Electoral system of New Zealand.) 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In 1993 New Zealand adopted Mixed Member Proportional as its electoral system after many years of first-past-the-post. ...


Vote-counting and announcement

Polling places close at 7.00pm on election day. The process of the counting of the votes by polling officials then begins. Results (at this stage provisional ones) go to a central office in the capital, Wellington, for announcement as they arrive. In recent years, a dedicated official website, "www.electionresults.govt.nz" has provided "live" election-result updates. Electoral officers generally complete the provisional counting of ordinary votes on the night of the election, but counting of special votes (see "Voting") can take longer, occasionally producing surprise upsets. In 1999 the provisional result indicated that neither the Greens or New Zealand First would qualify for Parliament, but both parties qualified on the strength of extra special votes, and the so-called "major parties" ended up with fewer list seats than expected. The final results of the election become official when confirmed by the Chief Electoral Officer. Alternative meanings at Wellington (disambiguation) A view of Wellington from the top of Mount Victoria. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... Wikinews has related news: Greens Party refines Buy Kiwi Made scheme The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ... New Zealand First functions as a political party in New Zealand. ...


History of voting in New Zealand

Main article: History of voting in New Zealand

The first national elections in New Zealand took place in 1853, the year after the British government passed the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852. Note that New Zealand claims to have become the first country in the world to have granted women's suffrage, although the accuracy of this claim depends on the definitions used (see Women's suffrage). Voting in New Zealand was introduced after colonisation by British settlers. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was the first enactment to grant the colony of New Zealand self-government. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ...


Results

New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, is chosen by nationwide election. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The 1853 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 1st term. ... The 1855 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 2nd term. ... The New Zealand general election of 1860 was held between December 12 and March 28 to elect 53 MPs to the third session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between February 12 and April 6 to elect 70 MPs to the fourth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between January 14 and February 1 to elect 78 MPs to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1875 was held between December 29 and January 4 (1876) to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between August 15 and September 1 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held December 9 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1884 was held July 22 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1887 was held July 22 to elect 95 MPs to the ninth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1890 was held on December 5 to elect 74 MPs to the 11th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1893 was held November 28 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 12th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1896 was held December 4 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 13th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1899 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 14th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1902 was held November 25 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 15th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1905 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 16th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1908 was held November 17, November 24 and December 1 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 17th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held December 7 and December 14 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1914 was held December 10 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 19th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held December 17 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1922 was held December 7 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 21st session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1925 was held November 4 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 22nd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1928 was held on November 14 to elect 80 MPs to the 23rd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1931 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 24th term. ... The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 25th term. ... The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 26th term. ... The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 27th term. ... The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 28th term. ... The 1949 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 29th term. ... The 1951 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 30th term. ... The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 31st term. ... The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 32nd term. ... The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 33rd term. ... The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 34th term. ... The 1966 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 35th term. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1969 were 45 seats won by the National Party, and 39 seats won by the Labour Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... The New Zealand general election of 1972 was held to elect MPs to the 37th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1975 New Zealand general election was held to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1981 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... The 1993 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... Wikinews has news related to: Results of the 2005 New Zealand General Election The 2005 New Zealand general election took place on 17 September 2005 and determined the composition of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. ... The next New Zealand general election is expected to take place in late 2008, and must be held no later than 15 November 2008. ... Referendums (or referenda) are held only occasionally by the government of New Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Electoral Reform in New Zealand has, in recent years, become a political issue as major changes have been made to both Parliamentary and local government elections. ... Electoral Reform in New Zealand has, in recent years, become a political issue as major changes have been made to both Parliamentary and local government elections. ... By-elections in New Zealand occur to fill vacant seats in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ...

General elections

The following table lists all previous general elections held in New Zealand (note that elections for Māori seats initially took place at different times from elections for general seats). The table displays the dates of the elections, the officially recorded voter turnout, and the number of seats in Parliament at the time. On the right the table shows the number of seats won by the four most dominant parties in New Zealand's history (the Liberal Party and the Reform Party, which later merged to form the National Party, and the Labour Party), as well as the number won by other candidates (either independents or members of smaller political parties). 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original New Zealand Liberal Party. ... The Reform Party was New Zealands second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party. ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ...

Term Election Date(s) Official turnout Total seats Liberal  Reform Labour Others Indep.
United
National
1st 1853 election 4 July1 October No record 37 - - - - 37
2nd 1855 election 28 October28 December No record 37 - - - - 37
3rd 1860-1861 election 12 December28 March No record 53 - - - - 53
4th 1866 election 12 February6 April No record 70 - - - - 70
5th 1871 election 14 January23 February No record 78 - - - - 78
6th 1875-1876 election 30 December28 March No record 88 - - - - 88
7th 1879 election 28 August15 September 66.5% 88 - - - - 88
8th 1881 election 9 December 66.5% 95 - - - - 95
9th 1884 election 22 June 60.6% 95 - - - - 95
10th 1887 election 26 September 67.1% 95 - - - - 95
11th 1890 election 5 December 80.4% 74 - - - - 74
12th 1893 election 28 November 75.3% 74 51 - - - 23
13th 1896 election 4 December 76.1% 74 39 - - - 35
14th 1899 election 6 December 77.6% 74 49 - - - 25
15th 1902 election 25 November 76.7% 80 47 - - - 33
16th 1905 election 6 December 83.3% 80 58 - - - 22
Second Ballot period
17th 1908 election 17 November, 24 November, 1 December 79.8% 80 50 - - 1 29
18th 1911 election 7 December, 14 December 83.5% 80 33 37 - 4 6
Return to FPP
19th 1914 election 10 December 84.7% 80 33 41 - 5 1
20th 1919 election 17 December 80.5% 80 21 47 8 - 4
21st 1922 election 7 December 88.7% 80 22 37 17 - 4
22nd 1925 election 4 November 90.9% 80 11 55 12 - 2
23rd 1928 election 14 November 88.1% 80 27 27 19 1 6
24th 1931 election 2 December 83.3% 80 19* 28* 24 1 8
25th 1935 election 27 November 90.8% 80 7* 9* 53 4 7
26th 1938 election 15 October 92.9% 80 25 53 - 2
27th 1943 election 25 September 82.8% 80 34 45 - 1
28th 1946 election 24 November 93.5% 80 38 42 - -
29th 1949 election 30 November 93.5% 80 46 34 - -
30th 1951 election 27 December 89.1% 80 50 30 - -
31st 1954 election 13 November 91.4% 80 45 35 - -
32nd 1957 election 30 November 92.9% 80 39 41 - -
33rd 1960 election 26 November 89.8% 80 46 34 - -
34th 1963 election 30 November 89.6% 80 45 35 - -
35th 1966 election 26 November 86.0% 80 44 35 1 -
36th 1969 election 26 November 88.9% 84 45 39 - -
37th 1972 election 25 November 89.1% 87 32 55 - -
38th 1975 election 29 November 82.5% 87 55 32 - -
39th 1978 election 25 November 69.2%** 92 51 40 1 -
40th 1981 election 28 November 91.4% 92 47 43 2 -
41st 1984 election 14 July 93.7% 95 37 56 2 -
42nd 1987 election 15 August 89.1% 97 40 57 - -
43rd 1990 election 27 October 85.2% 97 67 29 1 -
44th 1993 election 6 November 85.2% 99 50 45 4 -
MMP era
45th 1996 election 12 October 88.3% 120 44 37 39 -
46th 1999 election 27 November 84.1% 120 39 49 32 -
47th 2002 election 27 July 77.0% 120 27 52 41 -
48th 2005 election 17 September 80.9% 121 48 50 23 -
49th 2008 election 2008

* The United Party (a regrouping of the Liberals) and the Reform Party contested the 1931 and 1935 elections as a coalition, but did not formally merge as the National Party until 1936.
** Due to major problems with the enrolment process, commentators generally consider that the 1978 election had a significantly higher turnout than official figures indicate.[3] See New Zealand general election, 1978.
The 1st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1853 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 1st term. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1855 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 2nd term. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1860 was held between December 12 and March 28 to elect 53 MPs to the third session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between February 12 and April 6 to elect 70 MPs to the fourth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between January 14 and February 1 to elect 78 MPs to the fifth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1875 was held between December 29 and January 4 (1876) to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between August 15 and September 1 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held December 9 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1884 was held July 22 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1887 was held July 22 to elect 95 MPs to the ninth session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1890 was held on December 5 to elect 74 MPs to the 11th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1893 was held November 28 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 12th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1896 was held December 4 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 13th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1899 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 14th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1902 was held November 25 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 15th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1905 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 16th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1908 was held November 17, November 24 and December 1 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 17th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held December 7 and December 14 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... The 19th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The New Zealand general election of 1914 was held December 10 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 19th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held December 17 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1922 was held December 7 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 21st session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1925 was held November 4 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 22nd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1928 was held on November 14 to elect 80 MPs to the 23rd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 24th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 1931 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 24th term. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 25th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 25th term. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 26th term. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 27th term. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 28th term. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1949 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 29th term. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1951 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 30th term. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 31st term. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 32nd term. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 33rd term. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 34th term. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1966 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 35th term. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1969 were 45 seats won by the National Party, and 39 seats won by the Labour Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand general election of 1972 was held to elect MPs to the 37th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1975 New Zealand general election was held to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 39th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand which began with the election of 1978 and finished with the election of 1981. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 40th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1981 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 41st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 42nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 43rd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 44th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1993 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 45th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 46th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 47th New Zealand Parliament was the most recent term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 48th New Zealand Parliament is the current term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... Wikinews has news related to: Results of the 2005 New Zealand General Election The 2005 New Zealand general election took place on 17 September 2005 and determined the composition of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The next New Zealand general election is expected to take place in late 2008, and must be held no later than 15 November 2008. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article discusses the party which originated in 1927 from a faction of the Liberal Party. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ...


By-elections

Further information: New Zealand by-elections

By-elections in New Zealand occur to fill vacant seats in the New Zealand Parliament. ...

Notes

  1. ^ REHABILITATED: TOM SCOTT
  2. ^ Sips causing political slips
  3. ^ General elections 1853-2005 - dates & turnout

See also

This electoral calendar lists the national/federal direct elections in the countries listed in the list of countries. ... Electoral Reform in New Zealand has, in recent years, become a political issue as major changes have been made to both Parliamentary and local government elections. ... In 1993 New Zealand adopted Mixed Member Proportional as its electoral system after many years of first-past-the-post. ... The Additional Member System (AMS) is a voting system where some representatives are elected from geographic constituencies and others are elected under proportional representation from party lists. ... Referendums (or referenda) are held only occasionally by the government of New Zealand. ...

External links

  • Electoral Commission website
  • Official election results website
  • Adam Carr's Election Archive

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Zealand elections - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2264 words)
New Zealand general elections occur when the Prime Minister requests a dissolution of Parliament and therefore a general election.
New Zealand currently has sixty-nine electorates (including seven Maori electorates specially set up for people of Maori ethnicity or ancestry who choose to place themselves on a separate electoral roll).
New Zealand claims to have become the first country in the world to have granted women's suffrage, although the accuracy of this claim depends on the definitions used - see women's suffrage.
Elections in New Zealand - November 1999 (4480 words)
November 1999 for New Zealand’s single-chamber parliament saw a big swing to the left and a clear majority of seats for a new coalition government to be formed by the two workers’ parties, Labour and the Alliance.
Apparently the new model for New Zealand to emulate is the Republic of Ireland.
The New Zealand Study of Values, which was published a year ago under the direction of Professor Alan Webster, a social psychologist, surveyed New Zealand social attitudes and values and correlated them with economic class and political preference.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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