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Encyclopedia > New Zealand Police
New Zealand Police
Image:Nz_police_logo.gif
Name: New Zealand Police
(Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa in Maori)
Motto: "Safer Communities Together"
Established: 1886 (1840 - 1886 known as the Armed Constabulary of New Zealand)
Stations: 400+
Staff: 10,500+
Districts: 12
Location: New Zealand
Website New Zealand Police Website

The New Zealand Police (Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa in Māori) is the national police force of New Zealand, responsible for enforcing criminal and traffic law, enhancing public safety, maintaining order and keeping the peace throughout the country. Image File history File links Nz_police_logo. ... Māori (or Maori) is a language spoken by the native peoples of New Zealand and the Cook Islands. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ...

Contents

Origins and history

The New Zealand Constabulary was established in 1840 along the lines of similar constabularies that existed in Britain at that time. The constabulary was initially part police and part militia. It was known as the New Zealand Armed Constabulary from 1867 and took part in land wars against Māori opposed to colonial expansion at that time. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Constabulary may have several definitions. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The word Māori refers to the indigenous people of New Zealand and to their language. ...


The New Zealand Police Force was established as a national force under the Police Act of 1886. In 1958, the word Force was removed from the name when legislation was revised. The current Police Act 1958 is being extensively modernised. There is an open consultative process supporting the drafting of a new Police Bill due to be submitted to Parliament in 2008. You can access information on the Police Act Review at [4] 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the 1981 Springboks tour, the Police formed two riot squads known as Red Squad and Blue Squad to control anti-apartheid protesters who laid siege to rugby fields where the touring team was playing. 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... First international British and Irish Lions 4 - 0 South Africa (30 July 1891) Largest win Uruguay 5 - 134 South Africa (11 June 2005) Worst defeat England 53 - 3 South Africa (23 November 2002) World Cup Appearances 3 (First in 1995) Best result Champions, 1995 The Springboks, Bokke or amaBokoboko are... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... A rugby union scrum. ...


In July 1985, the New Zealand Police arrested two French Security Service operatives after the Rainbow Warrior was bombed and sunk in Auckland harbour. The rapid arrest was attributed to the high level of public support for the investigation. 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of Francess Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (DGSE) / General Directorate for External Security. ... Rainbow Warrior is the name of a series of ships operated by Greenpeace. ... The Auckland Metropolitan Area, or Greater Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ...


A member of the New Zealand Police, Sergeant Stewart Graeme Guthrie, was the last civilian recipient of the George Cross, which is awarded for conspicuous gallantry. He fired a warning shot near a gunman at Aramoana on November 13, 1990, but was killed by a return shot from the gunman, who also killed twelve others. Stewart Graeme Guthrie of New Zealand is the most recent civilian recipient of the George Cross, which is equal to the Victoria Cross, but awarded for conspicuous gallantry not in the face of an enemy. ... The George Cross (GC) is the highest Commonwealth decoration awarded for acts of conspicuous gallantry not in the face of the enemy, while the Victoria Cross is awarded for valour in the face of the enemy. ... The Aramoana massacre was an incident that occurred on 13 November and 14 November 1990 in Aramoana, New Zealand. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ...

Flag of the New Zealand Police
Enlarge
Flag of the New Zealand Police

On 1 July 1992, the Traffic Safety Service of the Ministry of Transport was merged with the Police. Up until that time, the Ministry of Transport and local councils had been responsible for traffic law enforcement. In 2001, the Police re-established a specialist road policing branch known as the Highway Patrol. Today the Police are responsible for enforcing traffic law, while local councils enforce parking regulations. Image File history File links Nz-police. ... Image File history File links Nz-police. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


More recently, the New Zealand Police has been involved in peacekeeping missions to East Timor and the Solomon Islands, to assist these countries with establishing law and order after civil wars. They have also been involved in Community Police training in Bougainville, in conjunction with Australian Federal Police. Location of North Solomons (Bougainville) Province in Papua New Guinea The island and province Bougainville is part of Papua New Guinea and is the largest of the Solomon Islands group. ... The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the federal or Commonwealth police force of Australia. ...


Arms

AOS officers
AOS officers

New Zealand Police officers do not formally bear firearms while on patrol, but routinely carry pepper spray and batons. Police are also trialling a taser as a new non-lethal weapon (see below). Certain police cars can carry firearms in a secure container (usually a GLOCK 17 pistol); its use being supervised by a senior officer such as a sergeant. The presence of armed police at an incident is often considered a newsworthy event by the media. Image File history File links New_Zealand_AOS_01. ... Image File history File links New_Zealand_AOS_01. ... An assortment of modern handheld firearms using fixed ammunition, including military assault rifles, a sporting shotgun (fourth from bottom), and a tactical shotgun (third from bottom). ... Pepper spray is a non-lethal chemical agent which is used in riot control and personal self-defense. ... Baton can refer to: // Instruments Baton (via French bâton = stick from Late Latin bastum = stout staff, probably of Gaulish origin) refers to several types of cylindrical or tapered instruments composed of a wide variety of materials (finished, not wood in the natural state), with differing functions:- A baton (billy... Summary An electroshock gun or stun gun, is a weapon used for subduing a person by administering an electric shock. ... Non-lethal force is force which is not inherently likely to kill or cause great bodily injury to a living target. ... It has been suggested that GLOCK 17A be merged into this article or section. ...


In 1964, the Armed Offenders Squad (AOS) was created to provide a specialist armed response unit. The AOS is analogous to SWAT in the United States, and attends various emergency situations such as hostage-takings, or apprehension of armed criminals. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... AOS officers The Armed Offenders Squad (AOS) is a specialist unit of the New Zealand Police designed to cordon, contain and appeal to armed and dangerous offenders. ... Image:Members of the 600th Security Police Squadrons Base Swat Team. ...


In addition to the AOS, the New Zealand Police maintain a unit known as the Special Tactics Group. The STG, similar to the FBI's Hostage Rescue Team, is the last line of law enforcement response available before a police incident controller calls in the special forces - in New Zealand, the Special Air Service act as the military's counter-terrorism force. Because they train with the SAS, the STG are skilled at dynamic entry and other tactics that can make the difference in preventing a high-risk situation from resulting in the death of a police officer. // At present, the FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes and is second to only the United States Marshal Service in terms of law enforcement jurisdiction (although the USMS by practice relegates itself to judicial duties, making the FBI the de-facto lead... The Hostage Rescue Team (HRT) is the United States Federal Bureau of Investigations Counter-Terrorism tactical unit. ... For the band, see The Police. ... For other uses of the term, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand Army unit capable of undertaking special missions. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand Army unit capable of undertaking special missions. ... USMC using explosives in a dynamic entry situation in Okinawa, Japan. ...


Even if the incident controller calls in the SAS, an armed incident remains the jurisdiction of the New Zealand Police, with the IC having go/no-go control over the regiment's response team. The incident at Aramoana saw the Police request mobilisation of the SAS, but the incident was successfully resolved by the Armed Offenders Squad and Special Tactics Group before they actually responded. The Aramoana massacre was an incident that occurred on 13 November and 14 November 1990 in Aramoana, New Zealand. ... AOS officers The Armed Offenders Squad (AOS) is a specialist unit of the New Zealand Police designed to cordon, contain and appeal to armed and dangerous offenders. ...


Organisation

Although headed by a Commissioner, the New Zealand Police is a decentralised organisation divided into twelve districts, each with a geographical area of responsibility, several service centres that each provide a range of core nationwide services in their specialty areas, and a Police National Headquarters that provides policy and planning advice as well as national oversight and management of the organisation. Commissioner is a designation that may be used for a variety of official positions, especially referring to a high-ranking public (administrative or police) official, or an analogous official in the private sector (e. ...


District Commanders hold the rank of Superintendent. Area Commanders hold the rank of Inspector. Shift Commanders normally hold the rank of Senior Sergeant. Service Centre Managers may be sworn or non-sworn, depending on speciality. Superintendent (Supt. ... Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ...


The New Zealand Police is a member of Interpol and has close relationships with the Australian police forces, at both the state and federal level. Several New Zealand Police representatives are posted overseas in key New Zealand diplomatic missions. Interpol (or International Criminal Police Organization) was created in 1923 to assist international criminal police co-operation. ...


The Police also work closely with the Serious Fraud Office. The New Zealand Serious Fraud Office is based upon the British model. ...


Staff

While sworn officers make up the majority of the workforce, non-sworn staff and volunteers provide a wide range of support services where a sworn officer's statutory powers are not required.


Ranks

Rank insignia is worn on the epaulettes. Officers of Inspector rank and higher are commissioned by the Governor General, but are still promotions from the ranks of non-commissioned officers. Epaulette pronunciation: ĕp-ǝ-lĕt, a French word meaning little shoulders (epaule, referring to shoulder), originally meant only one type of ornamental shoulder piece or decoration used as insignia or rank by military or other organizations. ... A Governor-General (in Canada, Governor General) is most generally a governor of high rank, or a principal governor ranking above ordinary governors [1]. The most common contemporary usage of the term is to refer to the royally-appointed territorial governor of a region, or royal representative in a country... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...

  • Recruit — word "RECRUIT" below police number
  • Constable — police number
  • Senior Constable — one white point-up chevron above police number
  • Sergeant — three white point-up chevrons above police number
  • Senior Sergeant — white crown between two ferns above police number
  • Inspector — three silver stars ("pips")
  • Superintendent — one silver star below a crown
  • Assistant Commissioner — three silver pips in a triangle below a crown
  • Deputy Commissioner — silver crossed sword and baton below one star
  • Commissioner — silver crossed sword and baton below a crown.

New Zealand police uniforms formerly followed the British model closely but since the 1970s a number of changes have been implemented. These include the adoption of a medium blue shade in place of dark blue, the abolition of helmets and the substitution of synthetic leather jackets for silver buttoned tunics when on ordinary duty. Special armed units wear military style combat dress in dark blue when on operations. A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in law enforcement. ... Sergeant is a rank used in some form by most militaries, police forces, and other uniformed organisations around the world. ... Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ... Superintendent (Supt. ... Police Commissioner (or Commissioner of Police) is the title of the chief officer of many law enforcement agencies. ...

Highway Patrol Vehicle
Highway Patrol Vehicle

Image File history File links NZHighway_patrol. ... Image File history File links NZHighway_patrol. ...

Career advancement

Current New Zealand Police staff are able to apply for advertised positions within the New Zealand Police. Applicants submit their curriculum vitae (CV) and undergo an interview process. It is possible that the successful applicant may not be immediately awarded the position, as any other unsuccessful internal applicant applying for the same position is able to appeal the decision which also allows them access to the successful applicants CV. The appeals process may take several weeks to complete. ...


Accountabilities

While the New Zealand Police is technically a government department and has political representation in Government through the Minister of Police, the Commissioner and all sworn members swear allegiance directly to the Sovereign and, by constitutional convention, have constabulary independence from the government of the day. New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ...


Annual reporting

The New Zealand Police publishes an annual report for the year ending 30 June, reporting both financial and non-financial achievements. It also publishes a Statement of Intent, in conjunction with the Budget, that outlines the budget for the forthcoming year as well as performance measures and objectives. An annual report is a document which a company presents to its Annual General Meeting for approval by its shareholders. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ...


Crime statistics

In addition to the annual report, the Police also publishes six-monthly statistical summaries of crime for both New Zealand as a whole and each Police District. In early 2005, queryable crime statistics for both Recorded Crime and Recorded Apprehensions for the last 10 years were published by Statistics New Zealand. These statistics provide offence statistics down to individual sections of legislation and appear to be the most detailed national crime statistics available today. Crime statistics provide a statistical measure of the level, or amount, of crime that is prevalent in societies. ... Statistics New Zealand (Te Tari Tatau) is a New Zealand government department, and the source of the countrys official statistics. ...


Recent controversies

The New Zealand Police is considered one of the least corrupt police forces in the world. Despite this, there have been a number of recent controversies that have put the Police under close scrutiny. While the Police Complaints Authority is an independent body that investigates complaints against the New Zealand Police, the following events have either fallen outside the authority's ambit or received significant publicity.


CARD and INCIS projects

In 1998, a Parliamentary Select Committee inquiry severely criticised the CARD (Communications Centres) and INCIS[1] (computerisation) projects for mismanagement. A number of its recommendations were again put forward in the 2005 Independent Review of the Police Communications Centres. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... INCIS was the name of the Integrated National Crime Information System designed to provide information to the New Zealand Police in the 1990s, but which was abandoned in 1999. ...


Police Commissioner Doone's resignation

In 2000, Police Commissioner Peter Doone resigned after being severely criticised for interfering in the traffic stop of a vehicle which his future wife was driving and in which he was a passenger. He subsequently sued a Sunday newspaper for defamation concerning statements he allegedly made. In May 2005, the Doones switched the defamation case to the Prime Minister, Helen Clark, when the paper disclosed that she had confirmed their information. This article is about the year 2000. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other people named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ...


Historic sexual misconduct

In 2004, a number of historic sexual misconduct allegations dating from the 1980s were made against both serving and former police officers. Several senior officers were stood down. A commission of enquiry was convened but has made little progress to date due to formal charges being laid in several cases. In May 2005, the commission of enquiry was restructured to investigate only those cases where charges had not been laid.


In March 2006 assistant police commissioner Clinton Rickards and former police officers Brad Shipton and Bob Schollum were charged with raping and sexually abusing Louise Nicholas in Rotorua during in the 1980s. Rickards attended the High Court for the first day's hearing on 13 March 2006 wearing police uniform, contravening police regulations forbidding an officer from wearing uniform while on suspension. He had been suspended on full pay for two years from the time the charges were laid. The defendants claimed all sex was consensual and all were found not guilty on 31 March 2006[2][3][4]. Subsequently, pamphlets and emails about two of the defendants were spread widely in defiance of previous court suppression orders. [5] This does not cite its references or sources. ... Rotorua is a city located on the southern shore of Lake Rotorua in the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... The High Court of New Zealand was established in 1841 and known as the Supreme Court until 1980. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The same three men will face another trial later in 2006 for sexual offending against another woman, also in the mid 1980s. [6]


Communications Centres performance

In 2004 and 2005, the police have been criticised over several incidents in which callers to the Police Communications Centres, particularly those using the 1-1-1 emergency telephone number, are alleged to have received inadequate responses. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 111 has been the emergency telephone number in New Zealand since September 1958. ... Many countries public telephone networks have a single emergency telephone number, sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or occasionally the emergency services number, that allows a caller to contact local emergency services for assistance. ...

  • March 2004: Police were dispatched in Taupo after a call reported a man dying in an attack in Christchurch.
  • October 2004: Iraena Asher called 111 from Piha, expressing fears for her safety. Although a patrol car was available, police dispatched a taxi to pick her up. The taxi was dispatched to the wrong street in Onehunga and Asher later disappeared, despite being assisted by local Piha residents. To date, her body has not been found. This incident was the catalyst for what became a scathing review of the operation of the Police Communications Centres.
  • October 23, 2004: A Te Puke woman rang 111 while hiding in bushes outside her rural home, while armed intruders assaulted her husband. Police kept her on the phone for over an hour before help arrived, preventing her from ringing neighbours for help. Police stated that this was standard operating procedure and that it was too dangerous to involve more civilians in an armed incident and risk further injuries or deaths.
  • November 2004: A Wanganui man, Daniel Gray, rang 111 after being assaulted and having his jaw broken. He was told that the street he was calling from did not exist, and to ring back later. The people who assaulted him killed another man shortly afterwards.
  • January 14, 2005: A Plimmerton woman who called 111 to report two distressed swimmers was put in contact with an operator who did not know where Plimmerton was. Two other calls at the same time, reporting the same incident, were answered correctly and emergency services were dispatched. It appeared that the third call overloaded the system.
  • January 27, 2005: A Hamilton woman who called 111 after a sex attack was asked to walk 700 metres to the nearest police station to make a statement.
  • March 13, 2005: A driver made five 111 calls to report a drunk driver whom he followed from Coromandel to Auckland, but police failed to follow up on the calls.
  • March 15, 2005: After a 111 call from a Dargaville farm, police asked another farmer living 12 km away to check whether the call was genuine.
  • April 2, 2005: A call about a fight in Christchurch was not passed on to police patrols. Ninety minutes later a second fight in the same area resulted in grievous injury.

In October 2004, under sustained political scrutiny for these apparent systemic problems in the Communications Centres, and after the Iraena Asher incident received a lot of publicity and a whistleblowing employee resigned, the Commissioner of Police ordered an Independent Review into the Communications Centres. Taupo is a large urban area in the centre of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the third largest city in the country. ... Iraena Asher was an Auckland trainee teacher and model who disappeared in controversial circumstances at Piha, a West Auckland beach, on Monday, October 11, 2004. ... Looking north over South Piha beach to Lion Rock. ... Onehunga is a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Te Puke is a town located 28 kilometres southeast of Tauranga in the Western Bay of Plenty region of New Zealand. ... Wanganui   is an urban area and district on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The township of Plimmerton surrounds one of the more congenial beaches in the northwest part of the Wellington urban area in New Zealand. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hamilton (Kirikiriroa in Māori) is New Zealands fourth-largest city. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Coromandel can refer to several places: For the town and peninsula in New Zealand, see Coromandel, New Zealand and Coromandel Peninsula For the southeastern Indian coastline, see Coromandel Coast For the city in Minas Gerais, Brazil, see Coromandel (Minas Gerais) Coromandel, Mauritius is a community in Mauritius This is a... The Auckland Metropolitan Area, or Greater Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in Leap years). ... Dargaville is a town in the North Island of New Zealand. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ...


On May 11, 2005, the Review Panel released a report into the service that the Commissioner described as provocative, and others called "damning" [7]. It criticised the service for systemic failures and inadequate management, and expressed ongoing concerns for public safety. Despite the damning nature of the report, neither Police Commissioner Rob Robinson nor Minister of Police George Hawkins offered to resign [8][9]. With over sixty recommendations to act upon, the Commissioner immediately established as Implementation Board, with community representation, to oversee the operation of the Communications Centres and address the problems identified. May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... George Warren Hawkins (1946 - ) is a New Zealand politician. ...


Police acted on the recommendations of the review with a number of initiatives, including increasing communications centre staff numbers [10] and then initiating a demonstration project for a future Single Non-Emergency Number (SNEN) [11][12][13] centre, to reduce the load on the 111 service. The new centre is expected to commence service in November 2006.


Pornographic e-mails

In November 2004, police IT staff secretly cloned the police e-mail system and subjected it to forensic analysis. Over 300 employees were found to have what were considered "inappropriate" e-mail images, many sexually explicit. Many were subjected to internal disciplinary procedures and counselling. Several faced criminal charges for pornography. A further 351 staff members were required to attend Insight Training seminars between May 2005 and June 2006. The total cost of these seminars was $163,746 including $22,127 for venues and meals at conference centres around the country [14]. Information Technology (IT)[1] is a broad subject concerned with the use of technology in managing and processing information, especially in large organizations. ...


The Police Commissioner was politically criticised for being too soft with his staff, despite initiating the investigation and proactively making the findings of the investigation public before employees were even confronted and questioned about the e-mails concerned. This investigation is said to have prompted further investigations amongst other government agencies.


Police culture

After a sergeant was found guilty in February 2005 of assault and prisoner abuse in a South Auckland police station, there were claims that the practices were endemic in the police, and strange dark humour photographs surfaced. An investigation into "Police Culture" reported on 10 October 2005 that while the defunct Emergency Response Group at Counties-Manukau used excessive force and took inappropriate and degrading photographs of people in custody, there was no nationwide problem with police culture [15]. South Auckland is a common name for a part of Auckland, New Zealand. ... Black comedy, also known as black humor, is a subgenre of comedy and satire where topics and events normally treated seriously – death, mass murder, sickness, madness, terror, drug abuse, rape, etc. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cooked statistics

Following reductions in recorded crime in 2004 combined with increases in resolved offences, suggestions were made by both politicians, and some police officers, that statistics were being "cooked" or unethically reported and resolved by the Police, especially with the use of "custody clearances" for already convicted offenders [16][17]. The Police and the Police Minister have refuted these allegations [18], stating that the clearances concerned make up only 0.9% of all cleared crime and have been used consistently for many years.


Taser trial

The New Zealand Police Taser trial commenced on Friday 1 September 2006 for a twelve month period[19]. Some opposition to the trial has been expressed by various people, including Maori Party police spokesperson Hone Harawira, Green party police spokesperson, Keith Locke [20], and several high profile individuals including Barrister, Marie Dyhrberg and Sir Paul Reeves who have formed a lobby group opposing their use[21]. The first person to be tasered was an 18 year old after an incident in the Auckland suburb of Western Springs on 8 September 2006[22]. Summary An electroshock gun or stun gun, is a weapon used for subduing a person by administering an electric shock. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Maori Party, a political party in New Zealand based around Maori citizens, formed around Tariana Turia, a former Labour Party member who had been a New Zealand Cabinet minister in the current Labour-dominated coalition government. ... Hone Pani Tamati Waka Nene Harawira is a New Zealand politician. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo Wikinews has news related to: Greens Party refines Buy Kiwi Made scheme The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ... Keith Locke (born 1944) is a current New Zealand MP representing the Green Party who was first elected to parliament in 1999. ... English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions who employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ... The Right Reverend Sir Paul Alfred Reeves GCMG GCVO QSO (December 6, 1932–) was Archbishop and Primate of New Zealand and Bishop of Auckland from 1980 to 1985 and Governor-General of New Zealand from 1985 to 1990. ... The Auckland Metropolitan Area, or Greater Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... Western Springs is a residential suburb and park in the west of the city of Auckland in the north of New Zealand. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ Ministerial inquiry into INCIS MInistry of Justice, Dr Francis Small, November 2000
  2. ^ [1] Police rape trial, New Zealand Herald
  3. ^ [2] Rickards rape trial accuser to take stand, New Zealand Herald, 14 March 2006
  4. ^ [3] Jury clears men in police rape trial, New Zealand Herald, 31 March 2006
  5. ^ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/search/print.cfm?c_id=&storyid=000C264D-71AB-1435-95E883027AF1011C
  6. ^ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cfm?c_id=1&ObjectID=10383514
  7. ^ http://www.police.govt.nz/resources/2005/comm-centres-review/
  8. ^ http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3278715a6160,00.html
  9. ^ http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3277737a10,00.html
  10. ^ http://www.police.govt.nz/news/tenone/20050722-275/feature_commscentre.htm
  11. ^ http://www.police.govt.nz/news/tenone/20060915-289/feature-SNEN.htm
  12. ^ http://www.police.govt.nz/news/tenone/20060915-289/feature-SNENwhy.htm
  13. ^ http://www.police.govt.nz/news/tenone/20060915-289/feature-SNENmgr.htm
  14. ^ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/organisation/story.cfm?o_id=131&ObjectID=10396086
  15. ^ http://subs.nzherald.co.nz/feature/story.cfm?c_id=1500913&ObjectID=10349834
  16. ^ http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3287440a11,00.html
  17. ^ http://www.intl-news.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2215
  18. ^ http://uncorrectedtranscripts.clerk.govt.nz/Documents/20050301.htm#_Toc97460297
  19. ^ Tasers on the streets from this Friday, Derek Cheng, New Zealand Herald, 30 August 2006
  20. ^ Police too eager to use taser, Keith Locke, Green Party website 10 September 2006
  21. ^ Opponents fear abuse of stun gun, Derek Cheng, New Zealand Herald, 7 June 2006
  22. ^ First Use Of Taser By Police, Xtra MSN, 9 September 2006

Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo Wikinews has news related to: Greens Party refines Buy Kiwi Made scheme The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • (English) Official website
  • (English)Official website Statistics information

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New Zealand Police - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2640 words)
A member of the New Zealand Police, Sergeant Stewart Graeme Guthrie, was the last civilian recipient of the George Cross, which is awarded for conspicuous gallantry.
The New Zealand Police is a member of Interpol and has close relationships with the Australian police forces, at both the state and federal level.
While the New Zealand Police is technically a government department and has political representation in Government through the Minister of Police, the Commissioner and all sworn members swear allegiance directly to the Sovereign and, by constitutional convention, have constabulary independence from the government of the day.
New Zealand police to keep peace in East Timor for another year: official - iht,asia,New Zealand Timor Police - Asia - ... (357 words)
Police Minister Annette King said the move "reinforces the New Zealand government's commitment to peace and stability" in East Timor.
New Zealand deployed more than 200 troops and 25 armed police in May as part of an Australian-led international force of more than 3,000 troops to restore peace in Asia's newest nation after nearly 100 people were killed in violent clashes and arson attacks.
New Zealand police have previously served in U.N. missions in Timor-Leste, prior to the territory gaining independence from Indonesia, and in Namibia and Cyprus.
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