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Encyclopedia > New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. Image File history File links NewZealandParliament. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ...


Technically, the term "Parliament" encompasses both the monarch and the normally 120-member House of Representatives, but to most people, "Parliament" refers to the House of Representatives alone. Under the Constitution Act 1986, this usage became formal. The British New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 gave the country a bicameral parliament, with the House of Representatives as the lower house and the Legislative Council as the upper house. The Legislative Council was abolished in 1951 so the parliament is now unicameral. In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. ... The Legislative Council of New Zealand was the upper house of the New Zealand Parliament from 1853 until 1951. ... An upper house (Frequently known as a Senate) is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ...


New Zealand essentially follows the Westminster System of government. The Westminster System - also called Parliamentary System is a democratic system of government modelled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the British parliament. ...

Politics - Politics portal

New Zealand
Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ...


Flag of New Zealand
This article is part of the series:
Politics of
New Zealand
New Zealand coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... New Zealand functions as a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government. ...

Constitution
Parliament
Cabinet

Queen: Elizabeth II
Governor-General: Silvia Cartwright
Prime Minister: Helen Clark
Dep. Prime Minister: Michael Cullen
Ministers
Speaker of the House
Leader of the Opposition
Official Opposition The New Zealand Cabinet is, in practice, the highest body of the New Zealand governments executive branch. ... New Zealands Head of State is currently Queen Elizabeth II, and is given the title Queen of New Zealand. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative in the Realm of New Zealand of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ... Governor-General of New Zealand Dame Silvia Rose Cartwright PCNZM DBE (née Poulter) (born November 7, 1943) is New Zealands second female Governor-General, and as the Queens representative, lives in Government House in the capital city of Wellington. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... This article discusses the New Zealand Prime Minister. ... The Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand is second most senior officer in the Government of New Zealand, although this seniority does not necessarily translate into power. ... The Hon. ... Ministers, in the New Zealand government, are Members of Parliament who hold a ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government. ... In New Zealand The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, The House of Representatives (commonly known as Parliament). The Speaker fulfills a number of important functions in relation to the operation Parliament, much of which is based upon the British... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... The Official Opposition in New Zealand is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the ruling government. ...

Politicians
Political parties
Political topics
Supreme Court
State sector
Regional authorities
Elections
Electorates

The following is a list of New Zealand politicians, both past and present. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... This page lists a number of articles relating to issues, ideas, and events in New Zealand politics. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... State sector organisations in New Zealand (as at January 2004) are as follows: Parliamentary Offices Office of the Controller and Auditor-General (Tumuaki o te Mana Arotake) Office of the Ombudsmen (Nga Kaitiaki Mana Tangata) Office of the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (Te Kaitiaki Taiao a Te Whare Pāremata... Region is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ... Members of New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, normally gain their seats in nationwide general elections, or, less frequently, in by-elections. ... In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ...

Contents


Members of Parliament

The House of Representatives takes as its model the British House of Commons. It normally consists of 120 members, known as "Members of Parliament" or MPs. Until 1907 they had the title of 'Members of the House of Representatives' or MHRs (Parliamentary and Executive Titles Act 1907, passed when New Zealand became a dominion). Seats in the debating chamber form a horseshoe pattern, with members of the governing party or coalition sitting on the right hand of the Speaker and members of the opposition sitting opposite. The Speaker of the House of Representatives acts as the presiding officer. British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... In New Zealand The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, The House of Representatives (commonly known as Parliament). The Speaker fulfills a number of important functions in relation to the operation Parliament, much of which is based upon the British...


The executive branch of the New Zealand government (the Cabinet) draws its membership exclusively from Parliament, based on which party or parties can claim a majority. The Prime Minister (PM) leads the government: the Governor-General appoints the PM from a party or from a coalition which appears to have enough support in the House to govern. This support is immediately tested through a Motion of Confidence. The current government is a coalition between Labour and the Progressive Party; the Prime Minister is Helen Clark. The Leader of the Opposition is the leader of the largest opposition party. Currently the Leader of the Opposition is Don Brash of the National Party. Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... The New Zealand Cabinet is, in practice, the highest body of the New Zealand governments executive branch. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... Governor-General (or Governor General) is a term used both historically and currently to designate the appointed representative of a head of state or their government for a particular territory, historically in a colonial context, but no longer necessarily in that form. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament or other assembly of elected representatives to give members of parliament (or other such assembly) a chance to register their confidence in a government. ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ... This article discusses the New Zealand Prime Minister. ... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Dr Don Brash Dr Donald Thomas Brash (born 24 September 1940), New Zealand politician, has served as the Leader of the Opposition and leader of the National Party, the countrys main opposition party since October 2003. ... Current National Party logo The New Zealand National Party currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the Opposition. ...


For information on current members of Parliament, see 48th New Zealand Parliament. The 48th New Zealand Parliament will, when final results are confirmed and MPs are sworn in, be the next term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ...


Parliamentary elections

Election to the New Zealand Parliament is by the Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) electoral system, which provides for proportional representation. The MMP system means that there are usually several parties present in Parliament — at present, there are eight. The MMP system replaced the old "first-past-the-post" system after a referendum in 1993. The first MMP vote was at the 1996 election. The Additional Member System (AMS) is a voting system where some representatives are elected from geographic constituencies and others are elected under proportional representation from party lists. ... Proportional representation (PR) is a (by necessity multi-winner) electoral system whose use tends to make elections result in groups of votes being represented in proportional fractions in some body of representatives, i. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... The First Past the Post electoral system, is a voting system for single-member districts. ... Cite error 4; Invalid call; no input specified 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ...


Under the MMP system, the size of Parliament is normally 120 MPs. Slightly more than half of these (referred to as 'electorate MPs') are chosen from geographical electorates on a first-past-the-post basis; the remainder are chosen from closed party lists and are known as 'list MPs'. A candidate may contest an electorate, appear on the list, or both; candidates who have won electorate seats are eliminated from party lists before the list MPs are named. In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ... A list MP is a Member of Parliament (MP) who is elected from a party list rather than from a geographical constituency. ...


The number of electorate MPs is calculated in three steps. The less populated of New Zealand's two principal islands, the South Island, has a fixed quota of 16 seats. The number of seats for the North Island and the number of special reserved seats for Maori are then calculated in proportion to these. (The Maori seats have their own special electoral roll; people of Maori descent may opt to enroll either on this roll or on the general roll, and the number of Maori seats is determined with reference to the number of adult Maori who opt for the Maori roll.) The South Island The South Island forms one of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the North Island. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... After the establishment of Westminster-style Parliamentary Government in New Zealand in 1852, the Māori inhabitants had allotted to them from 1867 specific seats in the New Zealand Parliament. ...


The number of electorates is recalculated, and the boundaries of each redrawn so as to make them approximately equal in population within a tolerance of plus or minus 5%, after each quinquennial census. After the 2001 census, there were 7 Maori electorates and 62 general electorates, or 69 electorates in total. There were therefore normally 51 list MPs. By a quirk of timing, the 2005 election was the first election since 1990 at which the electorates were not redrawn since the previous election. The next census will be in 2006 and will apply to the 2008 election. An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The 2005 New Zealand general election will be a nation-wide election for the New Zealand Parliament, and is to be held on 17 September 2005. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will a Leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A party is not entitled to any list MPs unless it either wins 5% of the "party vote" (the more important of the two votes in MMP, which determines the overall proportionality of Parliament) or wins at least one electorate seat. The electorate-seat escape clause has twice saved parties from Parliamentary oblivion: New Zealand First in 1999 gained 4.26% of the party vote and five MPs thanks to its leader's razor-thin 63-vote margin in his home electorate of Tauranga, and Jim Anderton's Progressive Coalition (later renamed the "Progressive Party") gained two MPs from 1.7% of the vote after its leader comfortably held his electorate of Wigram. In addition, in both 1996 and 1999 the United Party won an electorate, but not enough party votes to entitle it to any additional list MPs. Current New Zealand First logo New Zealand First is a political party in New Zealand. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... United New Zealand logo   This article is about the party founded in 1995. ...


If a party wins more electorate seats than it would be entitled to proportionally, the size of Parliament is increased by the number of these so-called "overhang MPs" until the next election. This first occurred in the 2005 election. The 2005 New Zealand general election was held on 17 September 2005. ...


Passage of legislation

The New Zealand Parliament's model for passing Acts of Parliament is similar (but not identical) to that of other Westminster System governments. In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... The Westminster System - also called Parliamentary System is a democratic system of government modelled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the British parliament. ...


Laws are initially proposed to Parliament as bills. They become Acts after being approved three times by Parliamentary votes and then receiving Royal Assent from the Governor-General. The majority of bills are promulgated by the government of the day (that is, the party or parties that have a majority in Parliament). It is rare for government bills to be defeated. It is also possible for individual MPs to promote their own bills, called member's bills — these are usually put forward by opposition parties, or by MPs who wish to deal with a matter that parties do not take positions on. The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative in the Realm of New Zealand of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ...


First Reading

The first stage of the process is the First Reading. The MP introducing the bill (often a minister) will give a detailed speech on the bill as a whole. Debate on the bill generally lasts two hours, with MPs making ten-minute speeches on the bill's general principles. Speaking slots are allocated based on the size of each party, with different parties using different methods to distribute their slots among their MPs.


The MP introducing the bill will generally make a recommendation that the bill be considered by an appropriate Select Committee (see below). Sometimes, it will be recommended that a special Committee be formed, usually when the bill is particularly important or controversial. Parliament then votes as to whether the bill should be sent to the Committee for deliberation. It is not uncommon for a bill to be voted to the Select Committee stage even by parties which do not support it — since Select Committees can recommend amendments to bills, parties will often not make a final decision on whether to back a bill until the Second Reading. A Select Committee of the British Parliament is a committee made up of a small number of members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues. ...


Select Committee stage

The Select Committee will scrutinise the bill, going over it in more detail than can be achieved by the whole membership of Parliament. The public can also make submissions to Select Committees, offering support, criticism, or merely comments. The Select Committee stage is seen as increasingly important today — in the past, the governing party generally dominated Select Committees, making the process something of a rubber stamp, but in the multi-party environment there is significant scope for real debate. Select Committees frequently recommended changes to bills, with prompts for change coming from the MPs on the Committee, officials who advise the Committee, and members of the public. When a majority of the Committee is satisfied with the bill, the Committee will report back to Parliament on it. Unless Parliament grants an extension, the time limit for Select Committee deliberations is six months or whatever deadline was set by the House when the bill was referred. This article is about vulcanized rubber stamps. ...


Second Reading

The Second Reading, like the first, generally consists of a two-hour debate in which MPs make ten-minute speeches. Again, speaking slots are allocated to parties based on their size. In theory, speeches should relate to the principles and objects of the bill, and also to the consideration and recommendations of the Select Committee and issues raised in public submissions. Parties will usually have made their final decision on a bill after the Select Committee stage, and will make their views clear during the Second Reading debates. At the conclusion of the Second Reading debate, the House votes on whether to accept any amendments recommended by the Select Committee by majority (unanimous amendments are not subjected to this extra hurdle).


The Government (usually through the Minister of Finance) has the power (given by Parliament's Standing Orders) to veto any bill (or amendment to a bill) that would have a major impact on the Government's budget and expenditure plans. This veto could be invoked at any stage of the process, but if applied to a bill as a whole would most likely be employed at the Second Reading stage. This has not occurred since the veto power was introduced in 1996, although many amendments have been vetoed at the Committee of the whole House stage (see below). The Minister of Finance is a senior figure within the government of New Zealand. ...


If a bill receives its Second Reading, it goes on to to be considered by a Committee of the whole House.


Committee of the whole House

When a bill reaches the Committee of the whole House stage, the House resolves itself "Into Committee", that is, it forms a committee consisting of all members of Parliament (as distinct from a Select Committee, which consists only of a few members). When the House is "In Committee", it is able to operate in a slightly less formal way than usual.


During the Committee of the whole House stage, a bill is debated in detail, usually "part by part" (a "part" is a grouping of clauses). MPs may make five-minute speeches on a particular part or provision of the bill and may propose further amendments, but theoretically should not make general speeches on the bill's overall goals or principles (that should have occurred at the Second Reading).


Sometimes a member may advertise his or her proposed amendments beforehand by having them printed on a "Supplementary Order Paper". This is common for amendments proposed by government Ministers. Some Supplementary Order Papers are very extensive, and, if agreed to, can result in major amendments to bills. On rare occasions, Supplementary Order Papers are referred to Select Committees for comment.


The extent to which a bill changes during this process varies. If the Select Committee that considered the bill did not have a government majority and made significant alterations, the Government may make significant "corrective" amendments. There is some criticism that bills may be amended to incorporate significant policy changes without the benefit of Select Committee scrutiny or public submissions, or even that such major changes can be made with little or no notice. However, under the MMP system when the Government is less likely to have an absolute majority, any amendments will usually need to be negotiated with other parties to obtain majority support.


The Opposition may also put forward wrecking amendments. These amendments are often just symbolic of their contrasting policy position, or simply intended to delay the passage of the bill through the sheer quantity of amendments for the Committee of the whole House to vote on. In legislative debate, a wrecking amendment is an amendment made by a legislator who disagrees with the principles of a Bill and who seek to make it useless (by moving amendments to either make the Bill malformed and nonsensical, or to severely change its intent) rather than directly opposing the...


Third Reading

The final Reading takes the same format as the First and Second Readings — a two-hour debate with MPs making ten-minute speeches. The speeches once again refer to the bill in general terms, and represent the final chance for debate. A final vote is taken. If a bill passes its third reading, it is passed on to the Governor-General, who will (assuming constitutional conventions are followed) give it Royal Assent as a matter of course. It then becomes law.


Select Committees

Legislation is scrutinised by Select Committees. The Committees can call for submissions from the public, thereby meaning that there is a degree of public consultation before a parliamentary bill proceeds into law. The strengthening of the Committee system was in response to concerns that legislation was being forced through, without receiving due examination and revision. Each Select Committee has a Chairperson and a Deputy Chairperson. MPs may be members of more than one Select Committee. There are 18 Select Committees in the House of Representatives, as follows: A Select Committee of the British Parliament is a committee made up of a small number of members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues. ...

  • Business
  • Commerce
  • Education and Science
  • Finance and Expenditure
  • Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade
  • Health
  • Justice and Electoral
  • Law and Order
  • Local Government and Environment
  • Government Administration
  • Maori Affairs
  • Officers of Parliament
  • Primary Production
  • Privileges
  • Regulations Review
  • Social Services
  • Standing Orders
  • Transport and Industrial Relations

Occasionally a special Select Committee will be created on a temporary basis. An example was the Select Committee established to study the foreshore and seabed bill. The New Zealand foreshore and seabed controversy is a debate in the politics of New Zealand. ...


Upper house

The New Zealand Parliament does not have an upper house — unlike many other legislatures, it is unicameral rather than bicameral. It did, however, have an upper house before 1951 (the Legislative Council), and there have been occasional attempts to create a new one. An upper house (Frequently known as a Senate) is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


Legislative Council

Main article: New Zealand Legislative Council. The Legislative Council of New Zealand was the upper house of the New Zealand Parliament from 1853 until 1951. ...


The Legislative Council was intended to scrutinize and amend bills passed by the House of Representatives, although it could not initiate legislation or amend money bills. Despite occasional proposals for an elected Council, Members of the Legislative Council (MLCs) were appointed by the Governor, generally on the recommendation of the Prime Minister. At first, MLCs were appointed for life, but a term of seven years was introduced in 1891. It was eventually decided that the Council was having no significant impact on New Zealand's legislative process, and it ceased to exist at the beginning of 1951. At the time of its abolition it had 54 members, including its own Speaker. 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


Senate proposal

The National government of Jim Bolger proposed the establishment of an elected Senate when it came to power in 1990, thereby reinstating a bicameral system, and a Senate Bill was drafted. Senators would be elected by STV, with a number of seats being reserved for Maori, and would have powers similar to those of the old Legislative Council. The House of Representatives would continue to be elected by FPP. The intention was to include a question on a Senate in the second referendum on electoral reform. Voters would be asked, if they did not want a new voting system, whether or not they wanted a Senate. However, following objections from the Labour opposition, which derided it as a red herring, and other supporters of MMP, the Senate question was removed by the Select Committee on Electoral Reform, and the issue has not been pursued since. Current National Party logo The New Zealand National Party currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the Opposition. ... The Right Honourable James Brendan Jim Bolger, ONZ, (born 31 May 1935) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1990 to 1997. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... This article is about the year. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... Look up red herring on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Terms of Parliament

Parliament is currently in its 48th term.

Term Elected in Government
1st Parliament 1853 election No Parties
2nd Parliament 1855 election No Parties
3rd Parliament 1860 election No Parties
4th Parliament 1866 election No Parties
5th Parliament 1871 election No Parties
6th Parliament 1875 election No Parties
7th Parliament 1879 election No Parties
8th Parliament 1881 election No Parties
9th Parliament 1884 election No Parties
10th Parliament 1887 election No Parties
11th Parliament 1890 election Liberal
12th Parliament 1893 election
13th Parliament 1896 election
14th Parliament 1899 election
15th Parliament 1902 election
16th Parliament 1905 election
17th Parliament 1908 election
18th Parliament 1911 election Reform
19th Parliament 1914 election
20th Parliament 1919 election
21st Parliament 1922 election
22nd Parliament 1925 election
23rd Parliament 1928 election United
24th Parliament 1931 election United/Reform Coalition
25th Parliament 1935 election First Labour
26th Parliament 1938 election
27th Parliament 1943 election
28th Parliament 1946 election
29th Parliament 1949 election First National
30th Parliament 1951 election
31st Parliament 1954 election
32nd Parliament 1957 election Second Labour
33rd Parliament 1960 election Second National
34th Parliament 1963 election
35th Parliament 1966 election
36th Parliament 1969 election
37th Parliament 1972 election Third Labour
38th Parliament 1975 election Third National
39th Parliament 1978 election
40th Parliament 1981 election
41st Parliament 1984 election Fourth Labour
42nd Parliament 1987 election
43rd Parliament 1990 election Fourth National
44th Parliament 1993 election
45th Parliament 1996 election Fourth National (in coalition)
46th Parliament 1999 election Fifth Labour (in coalition)
47th Parliament 2002 election
48th Parliament 2005 election

The 1st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1853 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 1st term. ... The 2nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1855 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 2nd term. ... The New Zealand general election of 1860 was held between December 12 and March 28 to elect a total of 53 MPs to the 3rd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1866 was held between February 12 and April 6 to elect a total of 70 MPs to the 4th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1871 was held between January 14 and February 1 to elect a total of 78 MPs to the 5th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1875 was held between December 29 and January 4 (1876) to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 6th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1879 was held between August 15 and September 1 to elect a total of 88 MPs to the 7th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1881 was held December 9 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 8th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1884 was held July 22 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1887 was held July 22 to elect a total of 95 MPs to the 9th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1890 was held December 5 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 11th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1893 was held November 28 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 12th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1896 was held December 4 to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 13th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1899 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 14th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1902 was held November 25 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 15th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1905 was held December 6 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 16th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1908 was held November 17, November 24 and December 1 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 17th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1911 was held December 7 and December 14 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 18th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 19th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The New Zealand general election of 1914 was held December 10 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 19th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1919 was held December 17 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 20h session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1922 was held December 7 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 21st session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1925 was held November 4 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 22nd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The New Zealand general election of 1925 was held November 14 to elect a total of 80 MPs to the 23rd session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 24th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 1931 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 24th term. ... The 25th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 1935 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 25th term. ... The 1938 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 26th term. ... The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 27th term. ... The 1946 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 28th term. ... The 1949 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 29th term. ... The 1951 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 30th term. ... The 1954 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 31st term. ... The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 32nd term. ... The 1960 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 33rd term. ... The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 34th term. ... The 1966 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 35th term. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1969 were 45 seats won by the National Party, and 39 seats won by the Labour Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... The final results of the New Zealand General Election 1972 were 55 seats won by the Labour party (led by Norman Kirk) and 32 seats won by the National Party, with no minor parties winning any seats. ... The 1975 New Zealand general election was the first election in New Zealand where all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected. ... The 39th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand which began with the election of 1978 and finished with the election of 1981. ... The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. ... The 40th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1981 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 41st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1984 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 42nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1987 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 43rd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1990 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliaments 43rd term. ... The 44th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1993 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 45th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1996 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 46th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... The 1999 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 46th session of the New Zealand Parliament. ... The 47th New Zealand Parliament was the most recent term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 2002 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. ... The 48th New Zealand Parliament will, when final results are confirmed and MPs are sworn in, be the next term of the Parliament of New Zealand. ... The 2005 New Zealand general election will be a nation-wide election for the New Zealand Parliament, and is to be held on 17 September 2005. ...

Latest result

  Summary of the 17 September 2005 New Zealand Parliament election results Votes % Change Electorate
seats
List seats Total Change since 2002
New Zealand Labour Party 935,319 41.1 -0.2 31 19 50 -2
New Zealand National Party 889,813 39.1 +18.0 31 17 48 +21
New Zealand First 130,115 5.7 -4.7 0 7 7 -6
Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand 120,521 5.3 -1.7 0 6 6 -3
Māori Party 48,263 2.1 +2.1 4 0 4 +4
United Future New Zealand 60,860 2.7 -4.0 1 2 3 -5
ACT New Zealand 34,469 1.5 -5.6 1 1 2 -7
New Zealand Progressive Party 26,441 1.2 -0.5 1 0 1 -1
Other parties 29,828 1.3 0 0 0 0
Total 2,275,629 100.0 69 52 121
Informal votes 10,561
Total votes cast 2,286,190

The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... Current National Party logo The New Zealand National Party currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the Opposition. ... Current New Zealand First logo New Zealand First is a political party in New Zealand. ... Current Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand logo The Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament. ... The Māori Party, a political party in New Zealand based around Māori citizens, formed around Tariana Turia, a former Labour Party member who had been a New Zealand Cabinet minister in the current Labour-dominated coalition government. ... Current United Future logo United Future New Zealand is a political party in the New Zealand parliament with three MPs -- two list MPs, and one electorate MP, leader Peter Dunne (see MMP for the difference). ... ACT New Zealand is a free market liberal party in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Current Progressive Party logo The Progressive Party is a political party in New Zealand. ...

See also

The Treaty of Waitangi is an increasingly important source of constitutional law in New Zealand The constitution of New Zealand consists of a collection of statutes (Acts of Parliament), Treaties, Orders-in-Council, Letters patent, decisions of the Courts and unwritten constitutional conventions. ...

External links

  • Parliament of New Zealand
  • Debating Chamber
  • Legislative Council Chamber
  • Images from around Parliament Buildings

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