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Encyclopedia > New Zealand Expeditionary Force
New Zealand Army
Ngati Tumatauenga

Components
Regular Force
Territorial Force
Structure of the New Zealand Army
History
Battle of Gallipoli
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
Notable Units
SAS
Infantry Regiment
Intelligence

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) was the title of the military force sent from New Zealand to fight for Britain in World War I. Upon the outbreak of war, New Zealand immediately offered to provide two brigades — one of infantry and one of mounted troops — a total of 8,500 men. This contingent sailed for Australia within two months of the start of the war and then joined with the Australian Imperial Force in a convoy sailing for Egypt. The New Zealand Army (or NZ Army) (Maori Ngati Tumatauenga, Translation Tribe of the God of War (Note: Connotations include being landless, and thus from all of New Zealand) is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The New Zealand Army (or NZ Army) (Maori Ngati Tumatauenga, Translation Tribe of the God of War (Note: Connotations include being landless, and thus from all of New Zealand) is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non... The New Zealand Army (or NZ Army) (Maori Ngati Tumatauenga, Translation Tribe of the God of War (Note: Connotations include being landless, and thus from all of New Zealand) is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non... The New Zealand Army (or NZ Army) (Maori Ngati Tumatauenga, Translation Tribe of the God of War (Note: Connotations include being landless, and thus from all of New Zealand) is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non... Combatants British Empire France India Australia New Zealand Newfoundland Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Otto von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final) Casualties 252,000 (205,000 British, 47,000 French) 253,000[citation needed] The Battle of Gallipoli... An ANZAC soldier gives water to a wounded Turk The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (popularly abbreviated as ANZAC) was originally an army corps of Australian and New Zealand troops who fought in World War I at Gallipoli, in the Middle East and on the Western Front. ... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand Army unit capable of undertaking special missions. ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Intelligence Corp is one of the smallest corps in the New Zealand Army. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Italy Russia United States Serbia Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Nicholas II Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Reinhard Scheer Franz Josef I Conrad von Hötzendorf Ä°smail Enver Ferdinand I Casualties... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to military echelon under a division, above a regiment where that exists as such, nowadays often a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... The First Australian Imperial Force (1st AIF) was the main expeditionary force of the Australian Army during World War I. It was formed from August 15, 1914, following Britains declaration of war on Germany. ...


The NZEF was commanded throughout the war by General Alexander Godley, a British officer who in 1910, on the recommendation of Lord Kitchener, had been appointed as the commander of the New Zealand Defence Forces. New Zealand, like Australia, had a pre-war policy of compulsory military training but the NZEF was initially reinforced by volunteers only. Conscription was introduced on August 1, 1916 and by the end of the war 124,000 men — nearly half the eligible male population of 250,000 — had served with the NZEF. Of these, about 100,000 had been sent overseas. General Sir Alexander Goodley KCB, KCMG (1867-1957) was a First World War General, best known for his role as commander of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and British XXII Corps, although he was also Commander of the New Zealand Defence Force and had been in 1910 when he was... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum (June 24, 1850 - June 5, 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ... The military of New Zealand consists of three branches- the New Zealand Army; the Royal New Zealand Navy; and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The NZEF was closely tied to the AIF for much of the war. When the Gallipoli campaign began, the New Zealand contingent was insufficient to complete a division of their own so was combined with the Australian 4th Infantry Brigade to form the New Zealand and Australian Division, General Godley commanding. This division, along with the Australian 1st Division, formed the famous Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) under the command of General William Birdwood. Combatants British Empire France India Australia New Zealand Newfoundland Ottoman Empire Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Otto von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 14 divisions (final) Casualties 252,000 (205,000 British, 47,000 French) 253,000[citation needed] The Battle of Gallipoli... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to fifteen thousand soldiers. ... The New Zealand and Australian Division was formed at the start of the Battle of Gallipoli as a composite division under the command of New Zealand general Alexander Godley. ... The Australian 1st Division was formed in August 1914, at the outbreak of the First World War, as part of the Australian Imperial Force. ... The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... William Riddell Birdwood, 1st Baron Birdwood (13 September 1865 - 17 May 1951) was a World War I general who is best known as the commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Battle of Gallipoli in 1915. ...


After the end of the Gallipoli campaign, the NZEF formed its own infantry division; the New Zealand Division which served on the Western Front for the rest of the war. General Godley was promoted to a corps command and given II Anzac Corps, which contained the New Zealand Division. From 1916 until the formation of the Australian Corps in 1918 (made up of the five Australian divisions) there were always two "Anzac" corps — I Anzac Corps and II Anzac Corps — despite the fact that there was only one New Zealand Division to go around. The New Zealand Division was a World War I division formed in Egypt in January 1916 following the evacuation of Gallipoli. ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... A corps (a word that immigrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals... The II Anzac Corps was an Australian and New Zealand First World War army corps formed in Egypt in February 1916 as part of the reorganization of the Australian Imperial Force following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915. ... The Australian Corps was a World War I army corps that contained all five Australian infantry divisions serving on the British army in France. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The I Anzac Corps was an Australian and New Zealand World War I army corps formed in Egypt in February 1916 as part of the reorganization of the Australian Imperial Force following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915. ...


The mounted arm of the NZEF remained in Egypt and, combined with the 1st and 2nd Australian Light Horse Brigades, made up the Anzac Mounted Division which served through the Sinai and Palestine campaign. The Australian Light Horse in Palestine during World War I The Australian Light Horse soldiers were mounted infantry who served during the Second Boer War and World War I. The Light Horse differed from cavalry in that they usually fought dismounted, using their horses as transport to the battlefield and... The Anzac Mounted Division was a mounted infantry (light horse) division formed in March Egypt during World War I following the Battle of Gallipoli when the Australian and New Zealand mounted regiments returned from fighting as infantry. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 For other uses of the word Sinai, please see: Sinai (disambiguation). ... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


The New Zealand Expeditionary Force was finally disbanded on December 31, 1921. December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

[edit]

2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force

The 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force - at the outbreak of war in 1939 it was decided that New Zealand should provide an Expeditionary Force of one division, under then Major General Bernard Freyberg. This force became known as 2nd New Zealand Expeditionary Force and the division as 2nd New Zealand Division. The first echelon of 2 NZEF Headquarters and a Brigade Group landed in Egypt in February 1940. The second echelon, also a Brigade Group, was diverted to Britain on Italy's entry into the War and did not reach Egypt until March 1941. The third echelon arrived in Egypt in September 1940 and concentration of the division was completed just before it was deployed to northern Greece in March 1941. This force remained as part of the British Eighth Army to the end of WWII in 1945. The Rt Hon. ... The New Zealand 2nd Division was that countrys major land formation during much of World War II. Commanded for much of its existence by Lieutenant General Sir Bernard Freyberg. ... The Eighth Army was one of the best-known formations in World War II, fighting in the campaigns in North Africa and Italy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Zealand Expeditionary Force -&--&- Dedicated to the Memory of the NZEF in the Great War 1914-1918 (629 words)
New Zealand troops were the first to take any German territory with the bloodless capture of German Samoa in August 1914.
New Zealanders are most remembered for their service at Gallipoli between April and December 1915, but the vast majority of New Zealand casualties were sustained on the battlefields of the Western Front.
The New Zealand soldier rapidly gained a high reputation for courage and endeavour and by the end of the war the New Zealand Division on the Western Front was regarded as one of the best fighting Divisions in the Allied armies.
New Zealand Expeditionary Force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (429 words)
The NZEF was commanded throughout the war by General Alexander Godley, a British officer who in 1910, on the recommendation of Lord Kitchener, had been appointed as the commander of the New Zealand Defence Forces.
When the Gallipoli campaign began, the New Zealand contingent was insufficient to complete a division of their own so was combined with the Australian 4th Infantry Brigade to form the New Zealand and Australian Division, General Godley commanding.
The New Zealand Expeditionary Force was finally disbanded on December 31, 1921.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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