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Encyclopedia > New Zealand Army
New Zealand Army
Ngāti Tumatauenga

Components
Regular Force
Territorial Force
Structure of the New Zealand Army
History
History of the New Zealand Army
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
Battle of Gallipoli
Personnel
List of senior officers
Officer rank insignia
Enlisted rank insignia
Notable Units
SAS
Infantry Regiment
Intelligence

New Zealand Army (Maori: Ngāti Tumatauenga, "Tribe of the God of war"), is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... New Zealand Army (Maori: Ngāti Tumatauenga, Tribe of the God of war), is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... New Zealand Army (Maori: Ngāti Tumatauenga, Tribe of the God of war), is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... New Zealand Army (Maori: Ngāti Tumatauenga, Tribe of the God of war), is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... Belligerents British Empire Australia British India Newfoundland New Zealand United Kingdom Egyptian labourers[1] France Senegal Ottoman Empire German Empire[2] Austria-Hungary[3] Commanders Sir Ian Hamilton Lord Kitchener John de Robeck Otto Liman von Sanders Mustafa Kemal Strength 5 divisions (initial) 16 divisions (final) 6 divisions (initial) 15... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand Army unit capable of undertaking special missions. ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Intelligence Corp is one of the smallest corps in the New Zealand Army. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori,[1] commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) functions as one of the official languages of New Zealand. ... The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ... The military of New Zealand consists of three branches- the New Zealand Army; the Royal New Zealand Navy; and the Royal New Zealand Air Force. ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ...

Contents

Structure of the New Zealand Army

The New Zealand Army's combat units fall under the command of the Land Component Commander. Forces under the Land Component Commander include 2 Land Force Group and 3 Land Force Group and 1 NZ SAS Group. The Land Component Commander is under the command of HQ Joint Forces New Zealand at Trentham in Upper Hutt.

Structure of the Army of New Zealand

Tactical air transport for the army is provided by No. 3 Squadron of the RNZAF. During World War II the squadron operated Lockheed Hudsons and Lockheed Venturas as patrol bombers in the South Pacific. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ...


In the event of full mobilisation and deployment, the three infantry battalions plus the other necessary combat elements would form a brigade group, which exists on paper as 7 Brigade. HQ 2 Land Force Group would, if needed, form HQ 7 Brigade


Land Training and Doctrine Group

  • Land Operations Training Centre Waiouru encompasses the main army trade schools:
    • Combat School
    • School of Artillery
    • Logistics Operations School
    • School of Tactics
    • Royal New Zealand School of Signals
    • School of Military Intelligence and Security
    • Joint Catering School
    • Trade Training School (Trentham)
    • Joint Services Health School (Burnham)
    • School of Military Engineering, 2 Engineer Regiment (Linton)

The School of Military Intelligence and Security is the New Zealand Intelligence Corps (NZIC) school. ...

Regular Army

The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... The Special Air Service of New Zealand (NZ SAS) was formed in June 1955 as an elite New Zealand unit capable of special missions. ... The Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps (RNZAC) is the overall umbrella grouping of Regular Army and Territorial Force regiments equipped with armoured vehicles in the New Zealand Army. ... The Queen Alexandras Mounted Rifles is an armoured unit of the New Zealand Army, part of the Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps. ... Cap badge of the RNZA The Royal New Zealand Artillery forms the artillery section of the New Zealand Army. ... The 2nd Engineer Regiment is housed in Linton Military Camp that is situated approximately 10 km South of the City of Palmerston North. ... The Signals Corps provides, co-ordinates and operates the communications networks of the New Zealand Army. ... The RNZALR provides catering support (Cooks and Stewards) for 10 people or 400 people. ... The Royal New Zealand Army Medical Corps (RNZAMC) promotes health and disease prevention, and provides care for the wounded and sick. ... The New Zealand Intelligence Corp is one of the smallest corps in the New Zealand Army. ...

Territorial Force

The modern Territorial Force is divided into 6 battalion groups. Each of these is made up of smaller units of different specialities. The terms 'Regiment' and 'Battalion Group' seem to be interchangeably used, which can cause confusion. However, it can be argued that both are accurate in slightly different senses. In a tactical sense, given that the TF units are groupings of all arms, the term Battalion Group is accurate, though usually used for a much more single-arm heavy grouping, three infantry companies plus one armoured squadron, for example. NZ TF Battalion Groups are comprised of a large number of small units of different types. The term 'Regiment' can be accurately applied in the British regimental systems sense, as all the subunits collectively have been given the heritage of the former NZ infantry regiments (1900-1964).

Regiment
Infantry
Armoured
Artillery
Engineers
Logistics
Signals
Medical
Band
2nd Canterbury, and Nelson-Marlborough and West Coast Battalion Group
3rd Auckland (Countess of Ranfurly's Own) and Northland Battalion Group
4th Otago and Southland Battalion Group
5th Wellington West Coast and Taranaki Battalion Group
6th Hauraki Battalion Group
7th Wellington (City of Wellington's Own) and Hawke's Bay Battalion Group

TF regiments prepare and provide trained individuals in order to top-up and sustain operational and non-operational units to meet directed outputs. TF regiments perform the function of a training unit, preparing individuals to meet prescribed outputs. The six regiments command all Territorial Force personnel within their region except those posted to formation/command headquarters, Military Police (MP) Company, Force Intelligence Group (FIG) or 1 New Zealand Special Air Services (NZSAS) Group. At a minimum, each regiment consists of a headquarters, a recruit induction training (RIT) company, at least one rifle company, and a number of combat support/combat service support companies or platoons. The Canterbury, and Nelson-Marlborough and West Coast Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Auckland (Countess of Ranfurlys Own) and Northland Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Otago and Southland Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Wellington West Coast and Taranaki Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Hauraki Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Wellington (City of Wellingtons Own) and Hawkes Bay Regiment is a Territorial Force unit of the New Zealand Army. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


3/1st Battalion, Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment previously existed on paper as a cadre.[1] If needed, it would have been raised to full strength through the regimentation of the Territorial Force infantry units. Army plans now envisage a three manoeuve unit structure of 1 RNZIR, QAMR, and 2/1 RNZIR (light), being brought up to strength by TF individual and subunit reinforcements. En cadre is a French expression denoting a military unit composed mostly of officers. ...


Ethos

Service to the Crown. The New Zealand Armed Forces have a special constitutional position where its members are engaged to serve at the pleasure of the Sovereign. This service is carried out regardess of the political stamp of the Government and is reinforced by the Oath of Allegiance, commissions and warrants.


Professionalism. The Army is a professional service. To ensure success on the battlefield and in all other endeavours, professional standards are set at the highest possible level. Professionalism is achieved through the pursuit of excellence in all military and administrative tasks. It is also essential that superiors enhance the professional development of their subordinates through guidance and training.


Discipline. Because of the nature of the military task, it has long been recognised that a separate code of discipline is necessary. This code supports the requirement for the maintenance of acceptable conduct or behaviour in conditions of great stress. It also recognises the wide-ranging effects that can flow from a breakdown in discipline. This is reflected in the view that military life is the ordered application of force under an unlimited liability.


Teamwork. Warfare has always been the setting for great endeavours and requires that all participants contribute to the achievement of success in battle. As the range of all military activity has expanded, the reliance on effective teams working together has become a greater contributor to survival and success.


Mutual respect between ranks. The high demand for teamwork and discipline generates the need for a high level of respect between all levels of the Army. This respect builds a binding and tolerance that can be likened to a large family.


Leadership. The stresses of battle require that a high degree of leadership is displayed and exercised at each level. Demands are severe on leaders, who must have the moral and spiritual courage to withstand those demands. They must be caring enough to place the welfare of others before their own. In addition to the personal duty of obedience and self-sacrifice required of soldiers, officers must, by their conduct and character, inspire those qualities in others.


Recognition of individual needs. The Army pays particular attention to the needs of individuals who must be able to play their part in the team effort. This concept involves the development of personnel through training and education, as well as recognising and providing for the welfare needs of the Army family.


Values

Honour. Honour is the value upon which the reputation for worthy behaviour depends. Honour calls for leadership by example, high standards of behaviour, and moral courage to make and enforce decisions in the full knowledge that those decisions may result in the loss of soldiers' lives.


Trust. All ranks must have trust and confidence in their comrades and superiors. Without this trust personal and professional relationships will not survive the severe pressure of the battlefield.


Loyalty. In the Army loyalty does not mean unthinking obedience. It means objectively determining and strongly arguing the best case when advice is called for, and then supporting the commander's decision when a judgement is made. Army members must be loyal to their leaders and their obligations and in turn leaders must be loyal to their subordinates, representing their interests and developing their abilities.


Integrity. Integrity is closely allied to honour and means soundness of moral character and principle. It implies honesty, sincerity, reliability, unselfishness, and consistency of approach. It also means that the conduct of Army personnel must be such that their integrity is never questioned, nor is the Army brought into disrepute.


Responsibility. Having made decisions it is vital that the individual takes responsibility for them. Mistakes must be freely and readily acknowledged, otherwise they cannot be learned from and be rectified for the future. Leaders must understand that they have a wider role and are responsible for both their own actions and the actions of subordinates under their command. They must therefore ensure that those subordinates are as well looked after, trained, and led as possible. This responsibility for subordinates is always present when one is in a position of command, and is not constrained to any concept of only within working hours.


Pursuit of excellence. The refusal to accept mediocrity whether in training or on operations, when combined with modern weapons and equipment, provides the combat power necessary for success. Qualities that provide for the pursuit of excellence include determination, tenacity, physical fitness, and self confidence.


Initiative. Army must develop in its leaders, at all levels, a high degree of initiative. This will enable the Army to be prepared to go anywhere at short notice and remain trained and ready to meet whatever conditions present themselves.


Adaptability and Flexibility. A major contributor to the Army's success to date has been its ability to adapt to different situations with ease. The Army has the versatility to adopt quickly to different environments or types of operations and tasks - from peace-support operations to participation in major conflicts.


Self Sacrifice. The willingness to serve the aim despite all dangers to self.


Mutual Support. The readiness to look after one's comrades.


Major Equipment

New Zealand LAV IIIs

Armoured Fighting Vehicles Image File history File links Download high resolution version (874x600, 111 KB) Summary Sourced from: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (874x600, 111 KB) Summary Sourced from: http://www. ...

  • 105 x NZ Light Armoured Vehicle (NZLAV)
    • 95 Infantry Mobility Vehicle (IMV)
    • 7 Light Obstacle Blade Vehicle (LOB)
    • 3 Recovery Vehicle (LAV-R)

Light operational vehicles The NZLAV armoured vehicle (AV) is a variant of the General Motors LAV III. It was developed by Canada and is the primary mechanized infantry vehicle of the New Zealand military. ...

  • 352 x Pinzgauer High Mobility All-Terrain Vehicle (248 non-armoured / 60 armoured)
    • 122 / 23 command and control variants
    • 68 / 37 crew served weapon carrier variants
    • 95 general service variants
    • 15 shelter carrier variants
    • 8 ambulance variants
    • 13 special operations

Missile/rocket systems Pinzgauer is a high mobility all-terrain 4x4 and 6x6 military utility vehicle manufactured in Guildford, Surrey, United Kingdom, by Automotive Technik (ATL). ...

Support vehicles Mistral is an infrared homing surface-to-air missile manufactured by the European multinational company MBDA missile systems (formerly by Matra BAe Dynamics). ... A soldier practices with the Javelin on a firing range. ... Carl Gustav anti-tank weapon in action With the Irish Army. ... The M72 LAW (Light Anti-Tank Weapon, also referred to as the Light Anti-Armor Weapon or LAW) is a portable one-shot 66 mm anti-tank weapon, designed in the United States by Talley Defense Systems, produced by Nammo Raufoss AS in Norway. ...

Soldiers training with a Javelin ATGM

Fire support/artillery Unimog (IPA: or IPA: ) designates a range of multi purpose four wheel drive medium trucks produced by Mercedes-Benz, a division of Daimler AG. The name Unimog is pronounced IPA: in German and is a portmanteau from the German UNIversal-MOtor-Gerät, Gerät being the German word for... Image File history File links NZ_Javelin_wn06031149tn. ... Image File history File links NZ_Javelin_wn06031149tn. ...

Weapons The L118 Light Gun is a 105 mm towed howitzer, originally produced for the British Army in the 1970s and widely exported since, including to the United States, where a modified version is known as the M119A1. ... The United Kingdoms L16 81 mm mortar is the standard mortar used by the British army. ...

This article is about the . ... The MAG is a Belgian 7. ... The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (M249 SAW) is the United States military designation for a sub-family of the FN MINIMI squad automatic weapon (from Mini-mitrailleuse French: mini-machine gun. Both are 5. ... M203 generally refers to the United States Army designation for a single shot 40 mm grenade launcher that attaches to the M16 assault rifle or the M4 Carbine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Benelli M3 Super 90 shotgun is a modern firearm. ... The SIG Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol chambered for the 9x19mm Parabellum, .40 S&W and . ...

M113 Replacement

New Zealand decided in 2003 to replace its existing fleet of M113 Armored Personnel Carriers, purchased in the 1960s, with the NZLAV [1], and the M113s were decommissioned by the end of 2004. An agreement made to sell the M113s via an Australian weapons dealer in February 2006 had to be cancelled when the US State Department refused permission for New Zealand to sell the M113s under a contract made when the vehicles were initially purchased. [2] The M113 is an armored personnel carrier family of vehicles in use with the US military and many other nations. ... The NZLAV armoured vehicle (AV) is a variant of the General Motors LAV III. It was developed by Canada and is the primary mechanized infantry vehicle of the New Zealand military. ...


The replacement of the M113s with the General Motors LAV III (NZLAV) led to a review in 2001 on the purchase decision-making by New Zealand's Auditor-General. The review found short-comings in the defence acquisition process but not the eventual vehicle selected. The NZLAV armoured vehicle (AV) is a variant of the General Motors LAV III. It was developed by Canada and is the primary mechanized infantry vehicle of the New Zealand military. ...


History

For more details on this topic, see Military history of New Zealand.

War had been an integral part of the life and culture of the Māori people. The Musket Wars dominated the first years of European trade and settlement. The first European settlers in the Bay of Islands formed a volunteer militia from which some New Zealand army units trace their origin. British forces and Māori fought in various New Zealand Wars starting in the north of the country in 1845, and culminating in major campaign in the Waikato in the mid 1860s, during which settler forces were used with great effect. The New Zealand army sent ten contingents to the Boer War. The military history of New Zealand spans several hundred years. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... The Musket Wars were a series of battles fought between various tribal groups of Maori in the early 1800s, primarily on the North Island in New Zealand. ... Russell, Bay of Islands. ... The Māori Wars, now more commonly being referred to as The Land Wars and also as the New Zealand Wars, refers to a series of conflicts that happened in New Zealand between 1845 and 1872. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...

Bringing in the wounded on the beach near Watson's Pier, Gallipoli in WWI.

In World War I New Zealand sent an expeditionary force, the 1NZEF, of soldiers who fought with Australians as the ANZACs at Gallipoli. A New Zealand Division was then formed which fought on the Western Front. In addition the Mounted Rifles fought in Palestine For other uses, see Gallipoli (disambiguation). ... New Zealand troops unloading at a French port in 1918. ... The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... For other uses, see Gallipoli (disambiguation). ...


In World War II the 2NZEF fought in Greece, Crete, North Africa and Italy. Following Japan's entry into the war, a third New Zealand division saw action in the Pacific, seizing a number of islands from the Japanese. Smaller, largely New Zealand special forces units, such as the original Long Range Desert Group in North Africa and Z Force in the Pacific also distinguished themselves. New Zealand entered the Second World War by declaring war on Nazi Germany at 9. ... The Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) was a British Army unit during World War II. The unit was founded in Egypt following the Italian declaration of war (June 1940) by Major Ralph A. Bagnold with the assistance of Captains Clayton and Shaw, acting under the direction of General Wavell. ... Z Special Unit, usually known as Z Force was a joint Australian, British and New Zealand commando unit, which saw action against the Empire of Japan during World War II. Z Special Unit carried out 284 covert operations in the Pacific. ...

Crossing the line, probably showing an Equator crossing ceremony on a WWI troopship en route to Europe.

In addition to the two divisions overseas, the Army raised three others at home during the Second World War. 1st Division was formed in the Northern Military District, 4th in the Central Military District, and 5th in the South. They were disbanded after the danger of invasion receded. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The New Zealand Army was formally formed from the New Zealand Military Forces following the Second World War. Attention focused on preparing a third Expeditionary Force potentially for service against the Soviets. Compulsory Military Training was introduced to man the force, which was initially division-sized. However succeeding governments reduced the force first to two brigades, and then a single one, preferring to allocate many of the available resources to maintaining the New Zealand infantry battalion in the Malaysia-Singapore area. That battalion, designated 1st Battalion RNZIR by that time, was brought home in 1989. Compulsory Military Training (CMT) was first introduced in New Zealand with the Defence Act of 1919 just after World War I (1914 to 1918). ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ...


Since World War II the New Zealand army has fought in the Korean War, the Malaysian Emergency, the Indonesian confrontation, the Vietnam war, East Timor, and the 2001 Afghanistan War. Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... It has been suggested that Briggs Plan be merged into this article or section. ... The Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation was an intermittent war over the future of the island of Borneo, between British-backed Malaysia and Indonesia in 1962–1966. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses of War in Afghanistan, see War in Afghanistan. ...

The military history of New Zealand spans several hundred years. ... The Musket Wars were a series of battles fought between various tribal groups of Maori in the early 1800s, primarily on the North Island in New Zealand. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... When the United Kingdom declared war on Germany at the start of the First World War, the New Zealand government followed without hesitation, despite its geographic isolation and small population. ... New Zealand entered the Second World War by declaring war on Nazi Germany at 9. ... Kiwi Hill, the headquarters of the 16th Field Regiment. ... New Zealands involvement in the Vietnam War was highly controversial, sparking widespread protest at home from anti-Vietnam War movements modelled on their American counterparts. ... New Zealand Army (Maori: Ngāti Tumatauenga, Tribe of the God of war), is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... // Origins Originally the British Royal Navy provided total security for the colony of New Zealand, but in 1846 the settlers bought a gunboat. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ...

Logo

The NZ Army logo has been altered to include a traditional Maori hand combat weapon called a Taiaha, and has the words Ngāti Tumatauenga below instead of NZ. Note the colours have been altered, as has the Crown surmounting the crest from the Imperial State Crown to St. Edward's Crown which also sits on the New Zealand coat of arms. A Taiaha (pronounced Tie-ah-ha) is a weapon carried by the Maori warriors of New Zealand. ... The Imperial State Crown is one of the British Crown Jewels. ... St. ...


Dress

New Zealand Army uniforms have historically followed the British pattern with the high crowned "lemon squeezer" hat as the most visible national distinction. This was adopted by the Wellington Regiment about 1912 and became general issue for all New Zealand units during the latter stages of World War I. The different branches of service were distinguished by coloured puggarees or wide bands around the base of the crown (blue and red for artillery, green for mounted rifles, khaki and red for infantry etc). The "lemon squeezer" was worn to a certain extent during World War II, although often replaced by more convenient forage caps or berets. Modern field wear is the camouflage pattern worn by most armies with bush hats or berets according to occasion. This "disruptive pattern" dress is also the usual working uniform and according the one most commonly worn. A USMC drill instructor wearing a campaign hat A Canadian Mountie wearing the familiar Stetson and Red Serge tunic at Expo 67 in Montreal. ... Puggaree may mean: pagṛī (पगड़ी), the Hindi word for turban. ... Basque style beret Black beret with military emblem A beret (pronounced pronounced in French or [ˈbɛreɪ] in English[1], except in the USA, where it is usually pronounced [bəˈreɪ][2]) is a soft round cap, usually of wool felt, with a flat crown, which is worn by both...


In recent years a number of distinctive New Zealand features have appeared. The "lemon squeezer", after being in abeyance since the 1950s, has been reintroduced for parade dress where it is usually worn with a version of the khaki "no 2" service dress of the British Army. Officer cadets and some bands wear this headdress with a scarlet and blue full dress uniform. A wide brimmed khaki hat with green pugaree, of a pattern formerly worn by the New Zealand Mounted Rifle (cavalry) regiments, has replaced the British style peaked cap as service dress headdress for all branches. The red or dark blue sashes worn by sergeants are now embroidered with a traditional Māori motif or 'mokowaewae' denoting speed and agility. On the infantry sash the mokowaewae appears in black, white and red diagonal 'steps' and on that of the New Zealand Scottish in green, black and white. Short Māori cloaks are sometimes worn by senior officers as a mark of distinction on occasions of special ceremony, though they are not part of the regulation uniform. Khaki is a common material in military uniforms Khaki is a type of fabric or the colour of such fabric. ... Service Dress was the name of the new khaki uniforms introduced by the British Army for use in the field, following the experiences of a number of imperial wars and conflicts, including the Second Boer War. ... For the German DJ/producer team, see Sash!. // A sash consists of a cloth belt used to hold a robe together, and usually tied about the waist. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ...


The British style mess uniform is still worn by officers and senior NCOs for formal evening occasions. A universal scarlet and blue pattern has recently replaced the various regimental and corps mess uniforms previously worn. A white jacket is substituted for the scarlet one in summer mess kit. The dark blue No 1 dress formerly worn by officers, before the general adoption of mess uniforms, is now retained only for the Chief of General Staff on State occasions. Three Canadian officers in shawl or rolled collar jacket and waistcoat style mess dress or mess kit. ...


Highland orders of dress (glengarry, kilt, sporrans etc) are authorised for wear by the New Zealand Scottish Squadron of the RNZAC, at the discretion of the Squadron Commander. They are also authorised for the pipes and drums of the 5th Battalion (Wellington, West Coast and Taranaki) of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment. Clan MacDonell of Glengarry is a branch of Clan Macdonald, taking its name from Glen Garry where the river Garry runs eastwards through Loch Garry to join the Great Glen about 16 miles (25 km) north of Fort William. ... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ... Semi dress black leather sporran A Sporran is a pouch made of leather or fur that is worn on a chain around the waist on the front of a kilt. ...

See also: British Army Uniform

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Deployments

The New Zealand Army currently participates in three major overseas deployments:

A Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) is an administrative unit of international aid to Afghanistan, consisting of a small operating base from which a group of sixty to more than one hundred civilians and military specialists work to perform small reconstruction projects or provide security for others involved in aid work. ... Buddhas of Bamyan, which dated back to Pre-Islamic Afghanistan, were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 calling them Un-Islamic. Photo by Hadi Zaheer Bamyan is one of the most beautiful and fertile valleys in Afghanistan. ... Motto: Unidade, Acção, Progresso (Portuguese: Unity, Action, Progress) Anthem: Pátria Capital (and largest city) Dili Official languages Tetum and Portuguese1 Demonym East Timorese Government Parliamentary republic  -  President José Ramos-Horta  -  Acting President Fernando de Araújo  -  Prime Minister Xanana Gusmão Independence from Portugal²   -  Declared November 28, 1975... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... Map of the Solomon Islands The Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI), also known as Operation Helpem Fren, was created in 2003 in response to a request for international aid by the Governor-General of the Solomon Islands. ... UN redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) is an international peacekeeping force overseeing the terms of the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel. ...

See also

The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. ... New Zealand military ranks are largely based on those of the United Kingdom. ... Artillery at the entrance to the QEII Army Memorial Museum The QEII Army Memorial Museum at Waiouru, New Zealand is the main museum of the New Zealand Army. ... Waiouru is a small town in the centre of the North Island of New Zealand. ... The military history of New Zealand spans several hundred years. ... The New Zealand Cadet Corps (NZCC), is one of the three corps in the New Zealand Cadet Forces, the other two being the Air Training Corps, and Sea Cadet Corps. ...

References

  1. ^ Ministry of Defence Briefing to the Incoming Government
  2. ^ "NZ troops to be kept in Afghanistan another year", New Zealand Herald, March 13, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-28. 

The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • NZ Army
  • NZ Defence Force

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