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Encyclopedia > New York Tribune
The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace University's building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City
The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace University's building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City

The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. The Tribune was created by Greeley with the hopes of providing a straightforward, trustworthy media source in an era when newspapers such as the New York Sun and New York Herald thrived on sensationalism. Although considered the least partisan of the leading newspapers, the Tribune did reflect some of Horace Greeley's idealist views. His journal had Karl Marx (and Friedrich Engels) as European correspondant in the early 1850s.[1] Image File history File links NewYorkTribuneBuilding. ... Image File history File links NewYorkTribuneBuilding. ... One Pace Plaza, completed in 1969, is the flagship building of Pace University in New York City, specifically designed for Pace. ... Photographic portrait of Greeley Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The original New York Sun began publication September 3, 1833, as a morning newspaper, and an evening edition began in 1887. ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818, Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883, London) was an immensely influential German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820, Wuppertal – August 5, 1895, London), a 19th-century German political philosopher, developed communist theory alongside his better-known collaborator, Karl Marx, co-authoring The Communist Manifesto (1848). ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven continents of the Earth. ...


During the American Civil War (1861–1865) the Tribune was a radical Republican newspaper, which supported abolition and subjection of the Confederacy instead of negotiated peace. During the first few months of the war, the Tribune's "on to Richmond" slogan pressured Union general Irvin McDowell into advancing on Richmond before his army was ready, resulting in the disaster of the First Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861. After the failure of the Peninsular Campaign in the spring of 1862, the Tribune pressured President Abraham Lincoln into instating John Pope as commander of the Army of Virginia. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Lincoln, President Ulysses S. Grant, General Jefferson Davis, President Robert E. Lee, General Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action... Extremism is a term used to describe the actions or ideologies of individuals or groups outside the perceived political center of a society; or otherwise claimed to violate common standards of ethics and reciprocity. ... GOP redirects here. ... This French poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until 29 May 1861) Richmond, Virginia (29 May 1861–2 April 1865) Danville, Virginia (from 3 April 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic... Nickname: River City, Cap City, R-V-A Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (D) Area    - City 62. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... General Irvin McDowell Irvin McDowell (October 15, 1818 – May 4, 1885) was an American military officer, famous for his participation in the American Civil War. ... First Battle of Bull Run Conflict American Civil War Date July 21, 1861 Place Fairfax County and Prince William County Result Confederate victory The First Battle of Bull Run, referred to as the First Battle of Manassas in the South, (July 21, 1861) was the first major land battle of... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Map of the events of the campaign. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Major General John Pope John Pope (March 18, 1822 – September 23, 1892) was a career Army officer and general in the American Civil War. ... The Army of Virginia was organized as a major unit of the Union Army and operated briefly and unsuccessfully in 1862 in the American Civil War. ...


Following Greeley's defeat for the presidency of the United States in 1872, Whitelaw Reid, owner of the New York Herald, assumed control of the Tribune. Greeley checked into Dr. Choate’s Sanitarium where he died a few weeks later. Under Reid's son Ogden Mills Reid the paper acquired the New York Herald to form the New York Herald Tribune, which continued to be run by Ogden M. Reid until his death in 1947. Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ... George Cheyne Shattuck Choate, was born on March 30, 1827 at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ...


Copies of the New York Tribune are available on microfilm at many large libraries. The original paper articles from the newspaper's morgue are kept at The Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin. Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University of Texas at Austin, often called UT or Texas, is the flagship[3][4][5][6][7] institution of the University of Texas System. ...


A "new" New York Tribune debuted in the late 70's early 80's in New York City. The paper, later changed its name to The New York City Tribune, was published by the Reverend Moon's Unification Church.


The "Moonie newspaper" as many came to know it, was the sister paper of today's Washington Times which is circulated primarily in the nation's capital. Both were published by News World Communications Inc.


The Tribune carried an expansive "Commentary" section with a decidedly conservative bent. It worked hard, as does today's Washington Times, to demonstrate complete editorial independence from Moon's Unification Church.


Indeed, included among the noteworthies who penned an occassional column for it was former New York City Mayor Ed Koch. However, from time to time Moon's Unifiction Church would make it's presence felt.


Today's Washington Times, which has a substantially higher circulation than The Tribune ever did, is not completely immune to the influence of it's Korean evangelist's influence.

Daguerrotype of the Tribune editorial staff by Mathew Brady, taken between 1849 and 1860
Daguerrotype of the Tribune editorial staff by Mathew Brady, taken between 1849 and 1860

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3356x2342, 1556 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Tribune Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3356x2342, 1556 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Tribune Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image:Matthew Brady 1875 cropped. ...

Trivia

  • The New York Tribune building was the first home of Pace University. Today, the site of where the building once stood is now the One Pace Plaza complex of Pace University's New York City campus. Ironically, Dr. Choate’s residence and private hospital, where Horace Greeley died, today is part of the campus of Pace University in Pleasantville, New York.

  Results from FactBites:
 
AP Wire | 10/19/2006 | Tribune, New York Times report slower advertising in 3rd quarter (561 words)
Tribune, which owns the Los Angeles Times, said it was still on track to decide on a restructuring strategy by the end of the year.
Tribune, Newsday and the Chicago Tribune, among other papers, reported a big jump in net earnings to $162.2 million, or 65 cents per share, compared with $21.9 million, or 7 cents per share, due to one-time gains as it unwound two complex partnerships with its largest shareholder.
Tribune, under pressure from its largest shareholder, has been considering ways to restructure the company, and a special committee of its board is expected to make recommendations by the end of the year.
§20. Horace Greeley—"The New York Tribune". XXI. Newspapers, 1775–1860. Vol. 16. Early National ... (674 words)
The New York Tribune under Horace Greeley exhibited the best features of the new and semi-independent personal journalism based upon political beginnings and inspired with an enthusiasm for service that is one of the fine characteristics of the period.
In editing the New Yorker Greeley had acquired experience in literary journalism and in political news; his Jeffersonian and Log Cabin, popular campaign papers, had brought him into contact with politicians and extended his acquaintance with the masses.
He strongly advocated the protective tariff because he believed that it was for the advantage of the workingman; and the same sympathy led him to give serious attention to the discussion of women’s rights with special reference to the equal economic status of women.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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