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Encyclopedia > New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
Type Stock exchange
Founded March 8, 1817
Headquarters New York City, USA
Key people John A. Thain, CEO
Website www.nyse.com

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the "Big Board", is a New York City-based stock exchange. It is the largest stock exchange in the world by dollar volume and the second largest by number of companies listed. Its share volume was exceeded by that of NASDAQ during the 1990s. The New York Stock Exchange has a global capitalization of $25.0 trillion as of December 31, 2006.[1] Image File history File links NYSE_logo. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... John Thain (left) with John Snow John Thain, 51 is the current CEO of the New York Stock Exchange. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, is a measurement of corporate size that refers to the current stock price times the number of outstanding shares. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, is a measurement of corporate size that refers to the current stock price times the number of outstanding shares. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


The NYSE is operated by NYSE Euronext, which was formed by its merger with the fully electronic stock exchange Archipelago Holdings and Euronext. The New York Stock Exchange trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street, and is composed of four rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located aT 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building, located at 18 Broad Street between the corners of Wall Street and Exchange Place, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978.[2] NYSE Euronext, Inc. ... In January 1997, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) implemented new Order Handling Rules that revolutionized trading in NASDAQ securities. ... Euronext N.V. is a pan-European stock exchange based in Paris[1] and with subsidiaries in Belgium, France, Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom. ... Trades on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange always involve a face-to-face interaction. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Broad Street is located in the Financial District in New York City, stretching from South Street to Wall Street. ... Exchange Place can be the name of: Exchange Place, Boston Exchange Place, Jersey City Exchange Place, New York City Exchange Place, London This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


NYSE Group merged with Euronext, and many of its operations (particularly IT and the trading platform) will be combined with that of the New York Stock Exchange and NYSE Arca. Euronext N.V. is a pan-European stock exchange based in Paris[1] and with subsidiaries in Belgium, France, Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom. ... NYSE Arca, previously known as ArcaEx is an entirely online stock exchange. ...

Contents

Business

NYSE on Wall Street, 2002
NYSE on Wall Street, 2002
New York Stock Exchange (June 2003)
New York Stock Exchange (June 2003)
Front Elevation of New York Stock Exchange
Front Elevation of New York Stock Exchange

The New York Stock Exchanges provides an efficient method for buyers and sellers to trade shares of stock in companies registered for public trading. The exchange provides efficient price discovery via an auction environment designed to produce the fairest price for both parties. Since September 30, 1985 the NYSE trading hours have been 9:30–16:00 ET. (As of February 9, 2007, the streetTRACKS Gold Shares ETF started its trading day on the NYSE at 8:20AM.) Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1544 × 1024 pixel, file size: 741 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1544 × 1024 pixel, file size: 741 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (586x798, 93 KB) Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City in 2003. ... Download high resolution version (586x798, 93 KB) Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City in 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 525 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (709 × 809 pixel, file size: 286 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, Simon Fieldhouse made this drawing. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 525 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (709 × 809 pixel, file size: 286 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, Simon Fieldhouse made this drawing. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... Exchange-traded funds (or ETFs) are open ended mutual funds that can be traded at any time throughout the course of the day. ...


As of January 24, 2007, all NYSE stocks can be traded via its electronic Hybrid Market (except for a small group of very high priced stocks). Customers can now send orders for immediate electronic execution, or route orders to the floor for trade in the auction market. In excess of 50% of all order flow is now delivered to the floor electronically. January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


On the trading floor, the NYSE trades in a continuous auction format. Here, the human interaction and expert judgment as to order execution differentiates the NYSE from fully electronic markets. There is one specific location on the trading floor where each listed stock trades. Exchange members interested in buying and selling a particular stock on behalf of investors gather around the appropriate post where a specialist broker, who is employed by a NYSE member firm (that is, he/she is not an employee of the New York Stock Exchange), acts as an auctioneer in an open outcry auction market environment to bring buyers and sellers together and to manage the actual auction. They do on occasion (approximately 10% of the time) facilitate the trades by committing their own capital and as a matter of course disseminate information to the crowd that helps to bring buyers and sellers together. The frenzied commotion of men and women in colored smocks has been captured in several movies, including Wall Street. Wall Street is an American film released in 1987. ...


In the mid-1960s, the NYSE Composite Index (NYSENYA) was created, with a base value of 50 points equal to the 1965 yearly close, to reflect the value of all stocks trading at the exchange instead of just the 30 stocks included in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. To raise the profile of the composite index, in 2003 the NYSE set its new base value of 5,000 points equal to the 2002 yearly close. (Previously, the index had stood just below 500 points, with lifetime highs and lows of 670 points and 33 points, respectively.) The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The NYSE Composite (NYSE: NYA) is a stock market index covering all common stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange, including American Depositary Receipts, Real Estate Investment Trusts, tracking stocks, and foreign listings. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Linear graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today Logarithmic graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI, also called the DJIA, Dow 30, or informally the Dow industrials, the Dow Jones or The Dow) is one of several stock market indices created... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


The right to directly trade shares on the exchange is conferred upon owners of the 1366 "seats". The term comes from the fact that up until the 1870s NYSE members sat in chairs to trade; this system was eliminated long ago. In 1868, the number of seats was fixed at 533, and this number was increased several times over the years. In 1953, the exchange stopped at 1366 seats. These seats are a sought-after commodity as they confer the ability to directly trade stock on the NYSE. Seat prices have varied widely over the years, generally falling during recessions and rising during economic expansions. The most expensive seat was sold in 1929 for $625,000, which, adjusted for inflation, is over six million in today's dollars. In recent times, seats have sold for as high as $4 million in the late 1990s and $1 million in 2001. In 2005, seat prices shot up to $3.25 million as the exchange was set to merge with Archipelago and become a for-profit, publicly traded company. Seat owners received $500,000 cash per seat and 77,000 shares of the newly formed corporation. The NYSE now sells one-year licenses to trade directly on the exchange. Media:Example. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Early image of the trading floorHABS photo
Early image of the trading floor
HABS photo

Image File history File links NY_stock_exchange_interior_LC-USZ62-94123. ... Image File history File links NY_stock_exchange_interior_LC-USZ62-94123. ... The abbreviation HABS has multiple meanings, including: The Haberdashers Askes School - A British private school Historic American Buildings Survey Montreal Canadiens - A canadian ice hockey team This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

History

See also: Economy of New York City

The origin of the NYSE can be traced to May 17, 1792, when the Buttonwood Agreement was signed by twenty-four stock brokers outside of 68 Wall Street in New York under a buttonwood tree. On March 8, 1817, the organization drafted a constitution and renamed itself the "New York Stock & Exchange Board". This name was shortened to its current form in 1863. Anthony Stockholm was elected the Exchange's first president. The NASDAQ MarketSite in Times Square. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Depiction of traders under the buttonwood tree The Buttonwood Agreement, which took place on May 17, 1792, started the New York Stock & Exchange Board (now called the NYSE, which is short for New York Stock Exchange). ... A Stock broker sells or buys stock on behalf of a customer. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Platanus occidentalis The American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), also known as American plane and Buttonwood, is one of the species of Platanus native to North America, where it is rather confusingly very often just called Sycamore, which can refer to other types of tree. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Anthony Stockholm was the first president of the New York Stock Exchange. ...


The first central location of the NYSE was a room rented for $200 a month in 1817 located at 40 Wall Street. But the volume of stocks traded had increased sixfold in the years between 1896 and 1901 and a larger space was required to conduct business in the expanding marketplace.[3] Eight New York City architects were invited to participate in a design competition for a new building and the Exchange selected the neoclassic design from architect George B. Post. Demolition of the existing building at 10 Broad Street and the adjacent lots started on 10 May 1901. The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... George Browne Post (1837 - 1913) was a U.S. architect. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The New York Stock Exchange building opened at 18 Broad Street on April 22, 1903 at a cost of $4 million. The trading floor was one of the largest volumes of space in the city at the time at 109 x 140 feet wide (33 x 42.5 meters) with a skylight set into a 72 foot high ceiling (22 m.) The main façade of the building features marble sculpture by John Quincy Adams Ward in the pediment, above six tall Corinthian capitals, called “Integrity Protecting the Works of Man”. The building was listed as a National Historic Landmark and added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 2, 1978.[4] is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... J.Q.A. Wards statue of George Washington (1882) in front of Federal Hall, New York John Quincy Adams Ward ( June 29, 1830 – 1910) was an American sculptor, who is most familiar for his colossal standing statue of Washington (illustration, right) on the steps of Federal Hall in... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... // List of Registered Historic Places in New York County, New York (Manhattan): See also: List of Registered Historic Places in New York ADMIRAL DEWEY (tugboat) African Burial Ground AMBROSE (lightship) American Stock Exchange American Thread Building Astor Place Subway Station (IRT) Bank of New York Building Battery Park Control House...


In 1922, a building designed by Trowbridge & Livingston was added at 11 Broad Street for offices, and a new trading floor called "the garage". Additional trading floor space was added in 1969 and 1988 (the "blue room") with the latest technology for information display and communication. Another trading floor was opened at 30 Broad Street in 2000. With the arrival of the Hybrid Market, a greater proportion of trading was executed electronically and the NYSE decided to close the 30 Broad Street trading room in early 2006. Producer of New York City Fire Department quarters Category:Architecture firms ...


Events

Security after 9/11
Security after 9/11
U.S. Secretary of Commerce Donald L. Evans rings the opening bell at the NYSE on April 23, 2003. Former chairman Richard Grasso is also in this picture.
U.S. Secretary of Commerce Donald L. Evans rings the opening bell at the NYSE on April 23, 2003. Former chairman Richard Grasso is also in this picture.


The Exchange was closed shortly after the beginning of World War I (July 1914), but it re-opened on November 28 of that year in order to help the war effort by trading bonds. Download high resolution version (480x640, 110 KB)Blockade in front of NYSE. Picture taken in April 2004. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 110 KB)Blockade in front of NYSE. Picture taken in April 2004. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Caption: U.S. Secretary of Commerce Donald L. Evans rings the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on April 23, 2003. ... Caption: U.S. Secretary of Commerce Donald L. Evans rings the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on April 23, 2003. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Donald Evans Donald Louis Evans with President of Peru Donald Louis Evans (born July 27, 1946) was the 34th U.S. Secretary of Commerce. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Grasso Richard A. Grasso (born 1946 in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York City) usually known by the nickname Dick, was chairman and chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange from 1995 to 2003, the culmination of a career that began in 1968 when Grasso was hired by the... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In finance, a bond is a debt security, in which the authorized issuer owes the holders a debt and is obliged to repay the principal and interest (the coupon) at a later date, termed maturity. ...


On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street outside the NYSE building, killing 33 people and injuring more than 400. The perpetrators were never found. The NYSE building and some buildings nearby, such as the JP Morgan building, still have marks on their facades caused by the bombing. // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The aftermath of the explosion. ... JPMorgan Chase & Co. ...


The Black Thursday crash of the Exchange on October 24, 1929, and the sell-off panic which started on Black Tuesday, October 29, are often blamed for precipitating the Great Depression. In an effort to try to restore investor confidence, the Exchange unveiled a fifteen-point program aimed to upgrade protection for the investing public on October 31, 1938. The 1929 stock market crash devastated economies worldwide The Wall Street Crash refers to the stock market crash that occurred on October 29, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed, leading eventually to the Great Depression. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1929 stock market crash devastated economies worldwide The Wall Street Crash refers to the stock market crash that occurred on October 29, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange collapsed, leading eventually to the Great Depression. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Great Depression started after October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


On October 1, 1934, the exchange was registered as a national securities exchange with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, with a president and a thirty-three member board. On February 18, 1971 the not-for-profit corporation was formed, and the number of board members was reduced to twenty-five. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


Following a 554.26 point drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average which was a 22.6% loss in a single day, the biggest ever before in a single day (DJIA) on October 19, 1987, officials at the Exchange for the first time invoked the "circuit breaker" rule to stop trading. This was a very controversial move and prompted a quick change in the rule; trading now halts for an hour, two hours, or the rest of the day when the DJIA drops 10, 20, or 30 percent, respectively. In the afternoon, the 10% and 20% drops will halt trading for a shorter period of time, but a 30% drop will always close the exchange for the day. The rationale behind the trading halt was to give investors a chance to cool off and reevaluate their positions. As a matter of fact, Black Monday was followed by Terrible Tuesday, a day in which the Exchange's systems did not perform well and some people had difficulty completing their trades. Linear graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today Logarithmic graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI, also called the DJIA, Dow 30, or informally the Dow industrials, the Dow Jones or The Dow) is one of several stock market indices created... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...

Further information: Black Monday (1987)

There was a panic similar to many with a fall of 7.2% in value on October 27, 1997 prompted by falls in Asian markets, from which the NYSE recovered quickly. DJIA (19 July 1987 through 19 January 1988) FTSE 100 Index (19 July 1987 through 19 January 1988) Black Monday is the name given to Monday, October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell dramatically, and on which similar enormous drops occurred across the world. ...

Further information: October 27, 1997 mini-crash

The NYSE was closed from September 11 until September 17, 2001 as a result of the September 11, 2001 attacks. The October 27, 1997 mini-crash is the name of a global stock market crash that was caused by an economic crisis scare in Asia. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


On September 17, 2003, NYSE chairman and chief executive Richard Grasso stepped down as a result of controversy concerning the size of his deferred compensation package. He was replaced as CEO by John Reed, the former Chairman of Citigroup. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Grasso Richard A. Grasso (born 1946 in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York City) usually known by the nickname Dick, was chairman and chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange from 1995 to 2003, the culmination of a career that began in 1968 when Grasso was hired by the... John Reed is the name of many different people: John Reed, Sr. ... Citigroup Inc. ...


On April 21, 2005, the NYSE announced its plans to acquire Archipelago, in a deal that is intended to bring the NYSE public. is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On December 6, 2005, the NYSE's governing board voted to acquire rival Archipelago and become a for-profit, public company. It began trading under the name NYSE Group on March 8, 2006. December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


On April 4, 2007, the NYSE Group completed its merger with Euronext, forming the NYSE Euronext. is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Marsh Carter is the Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, succeeding John S. Reed. John Thain is the CEO of the NYSE. Gerald Putnam and Catherine Kinney are the co-Presidents of the NYSE. John Shepard Reed is the Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange. ... John Thain (left) with John Snow John Thain, 51 is the current CEO of the New York Stock Exchange. ...


Chronology

NYSE's stock exchange traders floor before the introduction of electronic readouts and computer screens.
NYSE's stock exchange traders floor before the introduction of electronic readouts and computer screens.
DJIA drops 416 points on February 27, 2007.
Financial markets

Bond market
Fixed income
Corporate bond
Government bond
Municipal bond
Bond valuation
High-yield debt
Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x682, 139 KB) Historic American Building Survey New York Stock Exchange File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Stock Exchange ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x682, 139 KB) Historic American Building Survey New York Stock Exchange File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Stock Exchange ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is one of several stock market indices created by Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company founder Charles Dow. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... In economics a financial market is a mechanism that allows people to easily buy and sell (trade) financial securities (such as stocks and bonds), commodities (such as precious metals or agricultural goods), and other fungible items of value at low transaction costs and at prices that reflect efficient markets. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 110 KB)Blockade in front of NYSE. Picture taken in April 2004. ... The bond market, also known as the debit, credit, or fixed income market, is a financial market where participants buy and sell debt securities usually in the form of bonds. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Corporate bond is a bond issued by a corporation, as the name suggests. ... A government bond is a bond issued by a national government denominated in the countrys own currency. ... In the United States, a municipal bond or muni is a bond issued by a state, city or other local government, or their agencies. ... Bond valuation is the process of determining the fair price of a bond. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Stock Market
Stock
Preferred stock
Common stock
Stock exchange
A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A preferred stock, also known as a preferred share or simply a preferred, is a share of stock carrying additional rights above and beyond those conferred by common stock. ... Common stock, also referred to as common shares, are, as the name implies, the most usual and commonly held form of stock in a corporation. ...

Foreign Exchange Market
Retail forex
The foreign exchange (currency or forex or FX) market exists wherever one currency is traded for another. ... The Retail Forex (Retail Currency Trading or Retail Forex or Retail FX) market is a subset of the much larger Foreign exchange market. ...

Derivative market
Credit derivative
Hybrid security
Options
Futures
Forwards
Swaps
A derivatives market is any market for a derivative security, that is a contract which specifies the right or obligation to receive or deliver future cash flows based on some future event such as the price of an independent security or the performance of an index. ... A credit derivative is a contract (derivative) to transfer the risk of the total return on a credit asset falling below an agreed level, without transfer of the underlying asset. ... Definition A hybrid security, as the name implies, is a security that combines two or more different financial instruments. ... In finance options are types of derivative contracts, including call options and put options, where the future payoffs to the buyer and seller of the contract are determined by the price of another security, such as a common stock. ... In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a specified price. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Other Markets
Commodities market
OTC market
Real estate market
Spot market
Chicago Board of Trade Commodity market Commodity markets are markets where raw or primary products are exchanged. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) trading is to trade financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, or derivatives directly between two parties. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Template:The Spot Market The Spot Market or Cash Marketis a commodities or securities market in which goods are sold for cash and delivered immediately. ...

Valuation and Theories
Market Valuation
Financial market efficiency
Financial market efficiency is an important topic in the world of Finance. ...


Finance series
Financial market
Financial market participants
Corporate finance
Personal finance
Public finance
Banks and Banking
Financial regulation
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In economics a financial market is a mechanism that allows people to easily buy and sell (trade) financial securities (such as stocks and bonds), commodities (such as precious metals or agricultural goods), and other fungible items of value at low transaction costs and at prices that reflect efficient markets. ... There are two basic financial market participant catagories, Investor vs. ... Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Personal finance is the application of the principles of finance to the monetary decisions of an individual or family unit. ... Public finance (government finance) is the field of economics that deals with budgeting the revenues and expenditures of a public sector entity, usually government. ... “Banker” redirects here. ... Financial supervision is government supervision of financial institutions by regulators. ...

v d
  • 1792 - The NYSE acquires its first traded company[citation needed]
  • 1817 - The constitution of the New York Stock and Exchange Board is drafted[citation needed]
  • 1867 - The First Stock Ticker [1]
  • 1896 - Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) first published in The Wall Street Journal[citation needed]
  • 1903 - NYSE moves into new quarters at 18 Broad Street
  • 1907 - Panic of 1907
  • 1914 - World War I causes the longest exchange shutdown: four months, two weeks
  • 1915 - Market price is given in dollars
  • 1929 - Central quote system established; Black Thursday (October 24) and Black Tuesday (October 29) signal coming of Great Depression
  • 1943 - Trading floor is opened to women [5]
  • 1949 - Longest bull market begins[citation needed]
  • 1954 - DJIA surpasses its 1929 peak
  • 1966 - NYSE creates the Common Stock Index; floor data fully automated[citation needed]
  • 1970 - Securities Investor Protection Corporation established
  • 1971 - NYSE recognized as Not-for-Profit organization for tax purposes[citation needed]
  • 1972 - DJIA closes above 1,000
  • 1977 - Foreign brokers are admitted to NYSE
  • 1979 - New York Futures Exchange established
  • 1987 - Black Monday, October 19, sees the largest one-day DJIA percentage drop
  • 1991 - DJIA exceeds 3,000
  • 1996 - Real-time ticker introduced[citation needed]
  • 1999 - DJIA exceeds 10,000
  • 2000 - First NYSE global index launched[citation needed]
  • 2001 - Trading in fractions (n/16) ends, replaced by decimals (increments of $.01, see Decimalisation); September 11, 2001 attacks occur, closing NYSE for 4 sessions
  • 2003 - NYSE Composite Index relaunched and value set equal to 5,000 points
  • 2006 - NYSE and ArcaEx merge, forming the publicly owned, for-profit NYSE Group, Inc.; in turn, NYSE Group merges with Euronext, creating the first trans-Atlantic stock exchange group; DJIA tops 12,000 on October 19; NYSE Composite tops 9,000 on December 4
  • 2007 - US President George W. Bush shows up unannounced to the Floor about an hour and a half before an FOMC interest-rate decision on January 31, bringing the market to a complete standstill for approximately 30 minutes while Bush talks with specialists [6]; on February 27, DJIA drops 416 points, its largest point decline since 2001 (after a sharp drop in the Chinese stock market); DJIA closes above 13,000 on April 25; NYSE Composite closes above 10,000 on June 1

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Image File history File links Information. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday [[speech. ... Linear graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today Logarithmic graph of the DJIA from 1901 until today The Dow Jones Industrial Average (NYSE: DJI, also called the DJIA, Dow 30, or informally the Dow industrials, the Dow Jones or The Dow) is one of several stock market indices created... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an influential international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers [2]. It was the... Broad Street is located in the Financial District in New York City, stretching from South Street to Wall Street. ... The Panic of 1907 was a financial crisis in the United States. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Crowd gathering on Wall Street. ... The phrase Black Tuesday refers to September 29, 1931 when Estevan miners protesting were fired upon by RCMP officers. ... The Great Depression started after October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... A bull market is a prolonged period of time when prices are rising in a financial market faster than their historical average. ... The Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) is a Federally mandated insurance company that protects securities investors from harm if a broker/dealer defaults. ... DJIA (19 July 1987 through 19 January 1988) FTSE 100 Index (19 July 1987 through 19 January 1988) Black Monday is the name given to Monday, October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell dramatically, and on which similar enormous drops occurred across the world. ... In the management of currencies, decimalisation (or decimalization) is the process of converting from traditional denominations to a decimal system, usually with two units differing by a factor of one hundred. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The NYSE Composite (NYSE: NYA) is a stock market index covering all common stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange, including American Depositary Receipts, Real Estate Investment Trusts, tracking stocks, and foreign listings. ... NYSE Arca, previously known as ArcaEx, an abbreviation of Archipelago Exchange is an entirely online securities exchange on which both stocks and options are traded. ... Euronext N.V. is a pan-European stock exchange based in Paris[1] and with subsidiaries in Belgium, France, Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.nysedata.com/nysedata/asp/factbook/printer_friendly.asp?mode=table&key=2213
  2. ^ National Park Service, National Historic Landmarks Survey, New York, retrieved May 31, 2007.
  3. ^ The Building NYSE Group history
  4. ^ National Register Number: 78001877 National Historic Landmark
  5. ^ NYSE: Timeline"
  6. ^ Byron, Katy. "President Bush makes surprise visit to NYSE", CNN Money, Cable News Network, 2007-01-31. Retrieved on 2007-02-20. 

The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The Cable News Network, usually referred to as CNN, is a cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although the latter is not currently recognized in CNNs official history). ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


Coordinates: 40°42′24″N, 74°00′41″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



Stock Market v d
Types of Stocks
Stock | Common stock | Preferred stock | Outstanding stock | Treasury stock
Trading Stock
Participants: Market maker
Exchanges: Stock exchange | List of stock exchanges | New York Stock Exchange
SEAQ | NASDAQ | American Stock Exchange | London Stock Exchange
Frankfurt Stock Exchange | Euronext | Tokyo Stock Exchange
Stock Valuation
Trading Theories: Dow Theory | Elliott Wave Theory | Fundamental analysis | Technical analysis
Mark Twain effect | January effect | Efficient market hypothesis
Stock Pricing: Dividend yield | Gordon model | Income per share | Book value | Earnings yield | Beta coefficient
Ratios: Financial ratio | P/CF ratio | PE ratio | PEG ratio | Price/sales ratio | P/B ratio
Stock Related Terms
Dividend | Stock split | Growth stock | Investment | Speculation | Trade | Day trading

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